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  • #16
    Plumbdog,

    Extremely close on the Dutchman. I'll let a few other old people have a chance to chime in before I reply.
    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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    • #17
      Bob, Are you referring to a pear hanger, sometimes called a tear drop hanger? Connected to an anchor or clamp via threaded rod. Or the hinged clevis hanger?
      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

      Comment


      • #18
        I liked Plumbdogs explanation. I always thought a Dutchman was when you scabed in a piece of material to patch a void. In addition, in the old days if we didn't have hand crimpers to change a duct to a male end we would cut a Dutchman cut in the pipe to join it with a second pipe.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #19
          Well it seems the Dutchman has been around a lot more places and done more than I thought.

          The Dutchman I used all the time was a piece of four inch lead pipe stamped inside a steel or iron collar. The collar was packed and leaded into the spigot of a cast iron waste ell just below the floor under a toilet. The lead pipe was either 6 inches, one foot or two feet depending on what you ordered. This was then either formed into a lead closet flange by the really skilled old timers before me or had a brass closet flange wiped to it by plumbers like me.
          Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

          Comment


          • #20
            Thanks for the reply on the manhole. We're not allowed inside manholes, just to use them to visibly inspect something or running a line backwards with leader pipe. I wouldn't ever go in one anyways - one of our boys in Atlanta died this summer of methane when he went down in a manhole without any of the proper procedures or equipment. Left a wife and two kids behind - in his late 20's. The manhole I'm questioning was of usual size (a plate about two or three feet in diameter) it was approximately six feet to the bottom. All that was in the bottom was that four inch looking c/o with no cap. It had the appearance of a c/o holding water, but that is the way this one always looks according to the property owner.

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            • #21
              Theron,

              Are you sure it isn't just a manhole cover and concrete riser to gain access to the cleanout? It may be the sewer line was only installed as a 4" line from the begining but they wanted access to grade via the manhole and concrete riser.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #22
                ok, a figure #69 is a compression x mip 90. commonly used in the water connection to a dishwasher. 3/8'' comp. x 3/8'' mip brass 90.
                a figure #68 is a comp. x mip straight connector.

                a dutchman as i was always told was a lead joint poured to compensate for a closet bend that didn't come up all the way to the top of the flange. in fact i have a wooden tapered plug that i shove into the top of the closet bend that i then pour lead into to make the pipe come flush to the closet flange.

                rick.

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                • #23
                  Okay I looked up dutchman in a couple of online dictionarys. It appears a generic definition would be "a material used to conceal faulty construction".

                  As for calling a compression elbow a #69 fitting, is a bit of a stretch. That is more of a stock number than a plumbing term.

                  Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by plumber:
                    Bob, Are you referring to a pear hanger, sometimes called a tear drop hanger? Connected to an anchor or clamp via threaded rod. Or the hinged clevis hanger?
                    Yep, that's what I am talking about and how we refer to them (pear hanger) around here. No one calls them a Fig. 69 hanger but that is the Grinnell model number I remember correctly.

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                    • #25
                      Yeah i took the cover off. The c/o was at the bottom of the manhole about 6-8 feet down. We always called that a dishwasher elbow by the way.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Bob D.:
                        </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by plumber:
                        Bob, Are you referring to a pear hanger, sometimes called a tear drop hanger? Connected to an anchor or clamp via threaded rod. Or the hinged clevis hanger?
                        Yep, that's what I am talking about and how we refer to them (pear hanger) around here. No one calls them a Fig. 69 hanger but that is the Grinnell model number I remember correctly. </font>[/QUOTE]Bob,

                        Out here in California, I've always known "tear-drop hangers" as "adjustable band hangers". It's regional differences.

                        But, Rick's #69 means nothing to me. I have always ordered compression fittings by their proper description.

                        the dog
                        the dog

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                        • #27
                          Out here in California, I've always known "tear-drop hangers" as "adjustable band hangers". It's regional differences.

                          But, Rick's #69 means nothing to me. I have always ordered compression fittings by their proper description.

                          the dog [/QB][/QUOTE]


                          Dog, you mean "that thingamabob with a doohicky attached" is not a proper plumbing term?
                          Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            .
                            A pair of pants is a term used to describe the make up of a double stubout and vent combination behind a kitchen sink cabinet made with leadpipe and bar solder. The appearance of this piping before installation in the wall had the appearance of a pair of pants. I thought this was a national description but may be more localized to Illinois and Missouri than I realized. They were still widely used until the early 70s when ABS and PVC gained more acceptance.
                            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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