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Something to hold soldering equipment

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  • Something to hold soldering equipment

    I am lookign for some kind of bag/tray made for holding soldering equipment. Such as Mapp gas tanks.. hand torch.. flux.. brushes.. cutters?? is there anything other then just a simple bag?? what do you guys use?? thanks!

  • #2
    I simply use a plastic tool box which I modified with a few home made compartments that took about 3 minutes to make. It holds my mapp gas, torch head, flux jar, sand screen, brushes, gloves and rag, small cutters, reamer and inspection mirror along with other assorted small hand tools associated with copper fitting.

    I found the box size I was looking for at Sears on sale for a song. A few scraps of marlite and bingo. It even has those little lids on the top that I hate for other tool boxes but are perfect for spare cutters and reamer blades, copper screws, supply ferrels and nuts ect ect.

    I think its 20 or 24 inches long. Works well.
    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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    • #3
      I've found the simplest and easiest thing to use is a simple "tote" tray. It has a handle in the middle and on each side there's space for gas canisters, brushes, mesh, flux brushes, etc, even a small vise fits in it, and it has two smaller trays on each side of the handle that nicely hold screws for uni-strut or whatever.

      Of course, these don't really hold things down very well, it's not a concern to me but if preventing things from flying out of it, say, on a bumpy road concerns you then one of the Rubbermaid stepstool boxes are great, the lids close securely, they have a lift out tray inside you can keep smaller items like brushes in and bigger items go underneath, and of course it serves as a handy and stable stepstool as well.

      [ 11-09-2005, 06:59 PM: Message edited by: AZPlumber ]

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      • #4
        Thanks

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        • #5
          I'm a 5 gallon bucket guy myself.

          the dog
          the dog

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          • #6
            I have a bad habit with Bucket Bosses aka 5 gallon buckets. I have a bad tendency to just start throwing everything in there. Things start mysteriously coming out of my other tool boxes and sneaking right into the darn bucket. Pipe wrenches, die heads, hammers, levels, anything, and at the end of the week it weighs about 200 pounds and i have one more job to do and I can't lift the damn thing anymore.

            OK, I really am done amusing myself for now, promise.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by AZPlumber:
              I have a bad habit with Bucket Bosses aka 5 gallon buckets. I have a bad tendency to just start throwing everything in there. Things start mysteriously coming out of my other tool boxes and sneaking right into the darn bucket. Pipe wrenches, die heads, hammers, levels, anything, and at the end of the week it weighs about 200 pounds and i have one more job to do and I can't lift the damn thing anymore.

              OK, I really am done amusing myself for now, promise.
              AZPLUMBER,

              I agree with you, I don't like "bucket-buddy" type tool systems. I've always liked the traditional tool boxes.

              My respose was to the question of where you carry your soldering equipment.

              What I do is carry all or most of my tools on a company truck in various tool boxes. I keep 5 gal. buckets in the bed. If I am soldering I take a bucket and throw in solder/flux/sandcloth/tubing cutters/ect.

              My most basic hand tools are keept in a Ridgid tool bag. I bought it at Home Depot and don't know what it is called, but I like it alot.

              the dog

              [ 11-15-2005, 10:57 PM: Message edited by: plumbdog10 ]
              the dog

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              • #8
                I don't know if they even sell them any more but I have the old Ridgid Tool Bags that were a white canvas with a red bottom. They are leather trimmed and have a metal hinge in the top of the canvas. I don't think they will ever wear out.

                I can carry 18" wrenches inside or 24" with a little handle sticking out. I also like Plumbdog carry a 5-gallon bucket. They are great for carrying tools or draining water.

                I don't leave my tools in a bag or a bucket though. I learned early on it just makes it easier for a thief to carry your tools when they are in a container. All of my tools go back in the truck in tool compartments when I am done. With one glance I can generally tell if I've left somethiung behind.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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                • #9
                  I thought I would post this since this thread is still relatively new and the following story just happened yesterday.

                  An HVAC guy I know had a job yesterday on the less-well-off side of town. No heat. It was just dirty contacts on the combustion motor, so it just took him barely 5 minutes to finish and run out for the invoice book. His van was cleaned out. Sawzalls both battery and corded, a complete Ridgid 300, carriage, stand, etc, a Wirsbo expansion set (BIG $$) an entire tray full of all size oil nozzles, etc. He still is'nt sure of all that is lost.

                  To you service guys...However you carry your tools, lock em up!

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                  • #10
                    James, I really have to say that personaly after cleaning up flux time and time again (from a helper craming a bag in the side bin), underneath everything else. I stopped carrying one bag. This might sound crazy but one day on the weekend after a bad week at work, I dumped out on my work bench my very heavy bag of hand tools. Just as an example (don't ask why) but I had three hammers in there. Imagine what else! So I took the craftsman tool box, that has been sitting there since 2 Christmas' ago (gift from a customer) hard plastic with lift out tray's like a tackle box, and I made that a solder only tool box. The tray's hold my fitting brushes,acid brushes,striker,extra flints,turbo torch tips,reamer,thumb cutter,ect.. In the bottom I have my flux,solder,grit cloth,large tubing cutter,my rig and hose ect.. Since then soldering has been a joy. Don't get me wrong you still need other tools in that box as well, maybe a sizeing tool, and some channel locks or whatever. I'm just saying that the hard box worked well for the solder equiptment for me, and the reason I told you about the hammers is after seperating everything into seperate bags, you just might find you have enough tools to do the same (for example I have 2 pair of channel locks in each bag or box I have now.I have a solder box (no crushed flux yeah!),my cordless tool bag(told rigid I dont like the bag. ),everyday hand tool bag,fixture trim out bag (don't ask me why for 15 years I carried around a spud wrench on a rough in or top out?, cause it was in my bag.),and last I have a bag of tools just for med-gas and only med-gas, I wont go into why, that's a hole nother thread all together, and those who know, know why. Hope this helps, and seperating might sound stupid but it's easier on the back,finding what you need,and if you need two bags for something so what they offset each other in the carry. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                    christopher

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Quescodeplumb:
                      James, I really have to say that personaly after cleaning up flux time and time again (from a helper craming a bag in the side bin), underneath everything else. I stopped carrying one bag. This might sound crazy but one day on the weekend after a bad week at work, I dumped out on my work bench my very heavy bag of hand tools. Just as an example (don't ask why) but I had three hammers in there. Imagine what else! So I took the craftsman tool box, that has been sitting there since 2 Christmas' ago (gift from a customer) hard plastic with lift out tray's like a tackle box, and I made that a solder only tool box. The tray's hold my fitting brushes,acid brushes,striker,extra flints,turbo torch tips,reamer,thumb cutter,ect.. In the bottom I have my flux,solder,grit cloth,large tubing cutter,my rig and hose ect.. Since then soldering has been a joy. Don't get me wrong you still need other tools in that box as well, maybe a sizeing tool, and some channel locks or whatever. I'm just saying that the hard box worked well for the solder equiptment for me, and the reason I told you about the hammers is after seperating everything into seperate bags, you just might find you have enough tools to do the same (for example I have 2 pair of channel locks in each bag or box I have now.I have a solder box (no crushed flux yeah!),my cordless tool bag(told rigid I dont like the bag. ),everyday hand tool bag,fixture trim out bag (don't ask me why for 15 years I carried around a spud wrench on a rough in or top out?, cause it was in my bag.),and last I have a bag of tools just for med-gas and only med-gas, I wont go into why, that's a hole nother thread all together, and those who know, know why. Hope this helps, and seperating might sound stupid but it's easier on the back,finding what you need,and if you need two bags for something so what they offset each other in the carry. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                      I know why you have said everything you have said. Because, like me, you are on an endless queust to be organized on a construction site. What you want is to pull up to a jobsite and carry one box/bag/bucket to the area of your task. You may have got close, close enough to be half satisfied, but never completely.

                      I always admired my family, whom are all mechanics and machinists. They always worked in shops whith those great big rolling tool boxes. What a great thing to have all of your tools organized in drawers, and able to roll them right to where you are working.

                      Unfortunatly, we work in an industry that requires mobilzation. Constant mobilization.

                      the dog
                      the dog

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