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  • drain question.......

    We are planning on finishing our basement in the spring. We own an older home which still has a lot of galvanized pipe. Slowly i am replacing with my supply lines with copper. I am almost done with that and plan to start on the drains. we get a lot of back ups, the current drain pipe in the house appears to be 1 1/2" OD. Part of the problem we keep getting our drains clogged (primarily in the bathroom) is my wife has long hair, and i am sure that due to age there is a lot of gunk built up on the inside of the drains. when i begin to replace them with PVC i am thinking of changing the diameter to a minimum of two but thinking of going 2.5 to 3". My washing machine, upstairs dishwasher and condesent removal pump all drain into my deepsink. I want to tie all of these into the vertical pipe coming down from the kitchen sink. when we redo the kitchen we are also looking at installing a garbage disposal.

    I am thinking 3" pipes and clogs no more. is this the right way of thinking?
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    There is much more to plumbing drains than pipe size. Poor venting as well as bad system design is a problem in many older homes. You might want to see if you can hire a plumber who designs to current codes to evaluate your system and make recommendations.

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    • #3
      i have had a plumber out here for another issue and he checked the whole system. It is properly vented and the vents are not clogged. i did have that problem, lots of funk in the kitchen/basement area. crawled up on the roof and checked all the vents. one was clogged, cleaned it out and put a grate over it to prevent a future occurance. My home is properly vented. I knew enough to explore that first. so now it is time to replace the galvanized/cast with PVC.
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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      • #4
        Originally posted by spacebluesonoma:
        Part of the problem we keep getting our drains clogged (primarily in the bathroom) is my wife has long hair, and i am sure that due to age
        We won't tell her you said that...

        Just be aware that the plastic drain will be noisier than the steel. We added PVC drains in our spare bathroom, and it was surprisingly noisy. If you have access, you might insulate around it.
        Steve
        www.MorrisGarage.com

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        • #5
          don't oversize your pipes. Pipe sizes include sizing for adequate flow to rinse pipes. Oversizing pipes can provide inadequate flow. Do provide proper slope.

          Many a d-i-y-er has screwed up dwv plumbing. Find a helpful plumber who will help you lay it out. Look at new construction, prior to insulation to see how they do it.

          Fittings that look the same or similar have different functions and uses. They may not be interchangeable.

          There are books available.

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          • #6
            First off...Take lots of pictures of the old plumbing before tearing it out...This will help u putting it back..Second..Just cut out small sections at a time..Don't go gung -ho in there and remove everything at one time...You might not be able to get it all back in the same day...

            Your gonna need to borrow a tool to cut the cast iron..If that is what u have. It is hell if you do not have it..Trust me! Pm me ur email and maybe I can looka t some pictures for you and determine what fittings you need...Chris

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            • #7
              Yes I have a few books I have cosulted and such. the only question i cant find the answer to is maximum pipe drain diamater. I remember reading somewhere that it had something to do with if the drain is oversized it will not solve the problem because it will not allow the drain to self clean. part of drainage as i understand it is that pipe diameter has to be just large enough to ensure adequate water flow in a limited area to keep gunk from building up. As i have been slowly getting into problem areas with my supply lines i have noticed my 1/2" galvanizd has a lot of gunk built up in it restricting water flow. I am sure i have the same problems in my galvanized drains. Everything we have is 1.5" OD i want to go with 2" pvc. Plumber told me that would be fine. I am just wondering if 2.5 or 3 would be acceptable or would that just defeat the purpose

              thanks all

              ed
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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              • #8
                Dawgfan

                I have a sawzall with appropriate blade. Learned a valuable lesson when i did my soil stack, i should have rented the chain cutter. but for the 1.5" the sawzall will do the trick. Digital camera is a wonderful thing, though about that too. and yes i am going a little at a time to ensure if i do end up with a problem it does not leave my house unusable plumbingwise
                \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                • #9
                  I have found when been in a postion where i could not use my chain cutters....Take a metal blade and turn down the speed of ur sawzall...It keeps the blade from burning up...Na it will cut pretty quick also....

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                  • #10
                    You will want to be very carreful when installing any "grate" over the top of your vent pipes on the roof , because if you live in a cold area, this "grate" idea only offers a place for ice to build up and completely block off the vent completely.Also to avoid "buildup" in your drains, you must slope them properly, remember too much slope and the liguid drains away to rapidly leaving behind the solids, causing buildup and too little slope is just not good at all. "1:50" is ideal.

                    [ 12-05-2004, 02:51 AM: Message edited by: georgy ]

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                    • #11
                      I understand the importance of the slope of the drain. no one wants to seem to answer the question at hand. is 3" too big for a shower/sink drain? is 2" or 2.5" better?
                      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                      • #12
                        ok guys come on.....3" too big? 2.5" they way to go or what? this forum was set up to exchange ideas. those in the woodworking side amature or professional share their knowledge freely....why is that such a problem here???????????????????????????????????
                        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                        • #13
                          I would go no larger than 2" on a shower or sink drain. It will be more than adequate. If you are wanting to size the main pipes, go to the library and look at the UPC (uniform plumbing code). It gives a number value, called fixture units, for each fixture and a number value for each size pipe. Add up the fixtures you will have on a partular line and size the pipe to handle this amount.

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                          • #14
                            11/2 for your sink and 2 for the tub

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                            • #15
                              1 1/2" for the kitchen sink...even if we are planning on installing a garbage disposal?
                              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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