Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cutting cast iron pipe

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cutting cast iron pipe

    Does anyone have any experience cutting 2" cast iron pipe using something besides a snap(ratchet) cutter? Any advice would be appreciated.
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

  • #2
    You can buy sawzall blades that are made for the job. You could use a cutting blade on an angle grinder. You could put the pipe in a chop saw with the correct blade. Lots of possibilities.

    Comment


    • #3
      Big Tom...What type of blade would be used in a reciprocating saw or an angle grinder? I also have a power miter saw. If I wanted to, what type of blade would be best suited to the miter saw? In each of these applications, would I saw through the cast iron completely? Again, any detailed advice would be appreciated.
      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

      Comment


      • #4
        finer, depending on the location of the pipe. if it's not installed yet, a chop saw with an abrasive balde will work fine. i sometimes use a 14'' cut off saw to cut cast iron in the ditch. snap cutter can destroy old weak cast iron. a sawzall blade will work so so on cast iron, but lousey on no hub cast iron. a 10tpi blade will cut it. a porta band saw will do a great job on cast iron.

        for your application i would think a 4.5'' grinder with an abrasive cut off blade will work very good. wear your safety glasses and cut around the perimeter of the pipe until it's cut through. in a ditch with limited space and not abe to spin the pipe, you will have to cut a window cut into the pipe to allow for the grinder to cut the bottom off.

        typically a sawzall is my last choice and a 4.5'' grinder in the ditch is #1 choice for old cast iron. a 14'' gas saw if there is lots to cut, this will cut 4'' pipe without turning. new pipe a snap cutter. clean cut precision ends, a 14'' chop saw.

        havn't tried my new plasma cutter on cast iron yet

        rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          I use a reciprocating saw to cut cast iron. If fact, today I cut out about 30 feet of 2 inch cast iron and cut it into 6 manageable pieces. 7 or 8 cuts with one abrasive blade. Pour a little water on the blade/pipe while you are cutting and it gets the job done pretty well.

          Good luck with your project.

          Comment


          • #6
            Using an angle grinder you can cut a 4" piece of cast in 1 minute 30 seconds. Sawzall - five minutes - lots of vibration. For my angle grinder i use the 1/16" thick metal cutting. If i have a lot to cut, i use a diamond blade in the grinder. They don't seem to wear out near as quick.

            Comment


            • #7
              In a pinch a hammer and chisel will work (if you got all day). Sorry to tell you but a cut some that way many, many years ago, and it wasn't no wimpy 4" either, it was 12" XH.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                A little tip if you end up with a rough edge that you want to get rid of after cutting. Take an 8" crescent wrench and place it tightish over the part you want to remove and then just snap it off. Another tip when cutting with a grinder - Most of the time i'm cutting pipe in place. To prevent the pipe from dropping and pinching my blade, i usually leave about an inch uncut. Then i go in with a big flathead screwdriver and a hammer and wedge it in the crack and break it the rest of the way. Quite a bit safer that letting a stack squish your blade and possibly cause you to lose control of the tool or break a blade.

                Comment


                • #9
                  There is only two reasons to cut CI without either a chop saw or a snap cutter. The first is the pipe is in place and you cannot use a chop saw or a snap cutter. The second reason is your too cheap to buy a chop saw or a snap cutter.

                  Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks to all who replied to my request for information. Fortunately, an angle grinder with a cutting wheel did the trick. It was my first experience with cast iron and banded couplings and was fortunately on a vent line for an existing basement slop sink. And yes, I was to cheap to buy or rent a snap cutter. For 2 feet of 2" CI, it was hardly worth it. BTW, this plumbing stuff is almost as easy as wiring. If I ever figure out how to post photos, I'll put up a photo of the 4 zone boiler I retro-fitted to our 85 year old home in New York state.
                    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Plumbing's easy...

                      ....crap rolls down hill, payday's Friday.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        "...BTW, this plumbing stuff is almost as easy as wiring...."

                        That's why you had to ask how to cut CI pipe right, 'cause its so easy
                        ---------------
                        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                        ---------------
                        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                        ---------
                        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                        ---------
                        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I knew how to cut CI using a snap cutter. I just didn't want to have to rent one if I didn't have to. And, as this forum is filled with knowledgable individuals who are only too happy to collegially share their knowledge and experience, I thought it would be a good source of information. I was right in that regard judging from the helpful information I received. I underestimated, however, how touchy some people can be when an innocent observation leaves them moved to making sarcastic comments.
                          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FINER9998
                            I knew how to cut CI using a snap cutter. I just didn't want to have to rent one if I didn't have to. And, as this forum is filled with knowledgable individuals who are only too happy to collegially share their knowledge and experience, I thought it would be a good source of information. I was right in that regard judging from the helpful information I received. I underestimated, however, how touchy some people can be when an innocent observation leaves them moved to making sarcastic comments.
                            Finer,

                            Some of us make a living at this. It took years to learn. I looked at your profile you do not list an occupation. Big suprise.

                            You want free advice, you got it.
                            the dog

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              PLUMBDOG... Thanks you for your comments. In the future, I will endeavor to watch out for the overly sensitive toes on the forum. BTW, what's really interesting is that those forum members with the sensitive toes were not, generally speaking, among those who made the helpful suggestions.
                              there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X