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  • Moving a shower

    Hi
    I'm a carpenter and handyman and I mostly do remodelling type work. Plumbing is not my specialty. A customer wants to simply move a shower and I am trying to get the clearest idea of how to do this with my pretty scant plumbing knowledge. Most I've done is replace a few plumbing items. i havent seen the job yet but he cliams the ceiling is so low that the shower head is like waist high and he he may just want to turn the whole bathroom into a closet, and move the bathroom into some other room. at any rate it appears that I will have to be actually moving the shower at the very least. can anybody tell me the following:

    1. how difficult is this to do with limited plumbing experince?

    2. Assuming its one of these cheap plastic showers - is it set on the subfloor as is or is there some grouting involved or what?

    3. can anybody discuss in a general sense what will be done with the pipes - will I add extensions and so on, what in a general sense am I likely to encounter?

    4. How much should I charge him for the job.

    5. is moving the sink and toilet more difficult (I know the toilet probably is)

    6. any other relevant discussion apprecated.
    Thanks,
    Will

  • #2
    Originally posted by Will147
    Hi
    I'm a carpenter and handyman and I mostly do remodelling type work. Plumbing is not my specialty. A customer wants to simply move a shower and I am trying to get the clearest idea of how to do this with my pretty scant plumbing knowledge. Most I've done is replace a few plumbing items. i havent seen the job yet but he cliams the ceiling is so low that the shower head is like waist high and he he may just want to turn the whole bathroom into a closet, and move the bathroom into some other room. at any rate it appears that I will have to be actually moving the shower at the very least. can anybody tell me the following:

    1. how difficult is this to do with limited plumbing experince?

    2. Assuming its one of these cheap plastic showers - is it set on the subfloor as is or is there some grouting involved or what?

    3. can anybody discuss in a general sense what will be done with the pipes - will I add extensions and so on, what in a general sense am I likely to encounter?

    4. How much should I charge him for the job.

    5. is moving the sink and toilet more difficult (I know the toilet probably is)

    6. any other relevant discussion apprecated.
    Thanks,
    Will

    If you have limited plumbing knowledge I would suggest you not take this job, or sub-out the plumbing portion. It is impossible to tell you the easiest way to do this without seeing the existing plumbing. To explain even in general terms the proper way to rough-in these fixtures is beyond the scope of a forum post.

    How much should you charge? How can anyone answer that question with the limited information you have provided.
    the dog

    Comment


    • #3
      i second that dog. i was sure after i read the question and saw dog was the first to answer, it was going to be ugly.

      but the dog gave the same advice as i would at this time.

      stick with what trade you do best and leave the plumbing for the plumbers.

      a bathroom not plumbed properly will
      haunt the owner and the installer forever

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        I have to agree with the two above posts. I have seen too many newly remodeled bathrooms where I have told the home owner they need to tear it all out and start over. Even relocating a simple lavatory can be complicated depending on the type of pipe and the conditions. A shower or a water closet is even tougher. Besides networking with a plumber may get you more work within your own trade.

        Good luck - Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          I think if you have to ask then you are over your head. As a plumber I would not attempt to remove a supporting wall to open up my living room because I do not have the experience to do so. I can get the knowledge from a book but it’s the experience that gets the job done correctly and safely. Good luck.
          One of the best lessons I learned from my father is when he did nothing to help me. I then learned to help my self.

          Comment


          • #6
            hey

            thanks for the replies. yeah I'm coming to the same conclusion myself. The hell with getting into all that. The only thing I'm kind of worried about is if I just cosntruct a new bathroom with new shower stall and so on, leaving the plumbing to a plumber, how deeply will it depend on the plumbing thats already existing there. I guess a fair amount. anyway I can see its too general these questions before I actually even see the situation. I havent even seen it myself.

            Will

            Comment


            • #7
              Unless the piping can be visually inspected, I don't think a competent plumber could give you a bid price, but would have to do it t&m.

              Have your plumbing contractor write-up a t&m sheet at the end of each day listing the personel, hours they worked, material they installed, what they did, and note any special problems they encountered. They should submit this to you each day.

              Some of these residential remodels can get complicated, and homeowners will sometimes feel ripped of if it takes longer than they think it should (this is the "What's taking so long, all they have to do is install a couple of pipes" syndrome). Good documentation goes along way towards avoiding problems in the future.
              the dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Today with cameras and locators it is pretty easy to give a firm bid on bathroom remodels. Still you have to be careful and not assume anything. I did some consulting for a plumber recently who was called back to fix a problem at a bathroom where he did not get the original remodel.

                It appeared to be a fairly simple job at a retail store where a bathroom had been abandond at one time. The plumber who did get the job just removed some topping from the floor, set a closet ring and installed a san tee for the lav. After the job was completed nothing would drain and you could not snake the line.

                When the plumber I was working for was asked to come back and find the problem I ran my mini-seesnake and used my Navitrack to locate the problem. As it turns out the other end of the closet bend ran straight through a CI double san tee (it should have been a fig 5 fitting) and up into another abandond closet bend. With the use of a little string I was able to go down the double san tee only to find out it was also abandond about 10 feet away. The bottom line is a fairly simple job turned into a major job which could have been avoided with a little research.

                Mark
                Last edited by ToUtahNow; 05-28-2006, 12:36 PM.
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cameras give you a great view of the inside of the pipe, but don't tell you much about the what's outside the pipe. On a remodel, I would agree with a firm price, but this sounds more like a total relocation. I've seen too many times when a two day rough-in became a six day rough-in on relocations because structual conditions, underground footings, beems, ducts and electrical conduit made "on paper" plans obsolete. But on the whole I agree with you.

                  By the way, thank you for pointing out that a Fig. #5 is the correct fitting. Most inspectors I've run into lately don't enforce it, but that is the approved double inlet fitting. I actually had an argument with a plumber the other day. His contention was that a Fig. 5 is illigal, and the double santee is the correct fitting. We really need a licensing system for plumbers in California.
                  the dog

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