Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trap on Grease Interceptor.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Trap on Grease Interceptor.

    Another plumber I know called for an inspection on a 1,000 gallon grease interceptor the other day, and was written a correction notice for not having a running trap on the outlet.

    I installed numerous interceptors years ago, and did'nt remember using a running trap. I can't see any mention of it in the UPC.

    It was in a city in Orange County, California. Anyone ever hear of this.

    In my opinion this would amount to a double trap situation.

    the dog
    the dog

  • #2
    I would agree with you. I looked in my code book (KY) and this is not required. What would be the purpose of the second trap? It's already preventing gases from coming back because of what it is. That would just make the outlet harder to auger and more likely to back up in the future.

    Comment


    • #3
      plumbdog10,

      The City of San Juan Capistrano for instance requires a running trap on the outlet of a grease interceptor if the grease interceptor is not internally trapped.

      Do you know if the grease interceptor they installed was internal trapped or not?

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        Utah,

        I don't have that information, I'll check into it further.

        the dog
        the dog

        Comment


        • #5
          My information is a Jensen Pre-Cast interceptor. Based on the drawing, it does not seem to be internally trapped. The baffle does not extend to the top, which would allow sewer gas to float to the inlet.

          My experience with interceptors was from years ago, which were designed differently. You are correct, that the interceptor is not the trap that it used to be. My question would be: So what? Why does this need to be trapped?

          If the building drain does not need to be trapped, why does an exterior tank?

          Utah, I know you are not making the decisions, I'm just asking for a logical answer if you have one.

          the dog
          the dog

          Comment


          • #6
            dog,

            Sorry I missed this post. My understanding is during a no flow period you can get sewer gases flowing though the trap back towards the fixtures. Since there is an air intake on the flow control fitting the sewer gas can pass through the intake.

            I have not seen the problem too often but one of the worst I've seen is at the Orleans Casino in Las Vegas. At night time when the kitchens shut down you don't want to walk to the rear parking lot.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Utah,

              The interceptors I have installed are gas-tite (or are supposed to be), and were vented on the outlet side. Any residual sewer gas entering the building would be stopped by the individual fixture traps, and allowed to escape through the various fixture vents. In other words, the situation would be the same wether the interceptor is installed in the sewer line or not.

              In any event, I have been told that the situation has been resolved, and that a running trap is not required on an interceptor.

              the dog
              the dog

              Comment


              • #8
                dog,

                Where the gas escapes is when you have a flow control device. The air intake on the flow control becomes a vent when you are in a no flow condition.

                The trick to the code on running traps is where it says "when required". Not all inspectors bother to read the entire spec sheet. My guess is any thing Jensen Precast does is already engineered in.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ToUtahNow:
                  dog,

                  Where the gas escapes is when you have a flow control device. The air intake on the flow control becomes a vent when you are in a no flow condition.

                  The trick to the code on running traps is where it says "when required". Not all inspectors bother to read the entire spec sheet. My guess is any thing Jensen Precast does is already engineered in.

                  Mark
                  Utah,

                  I think you are refering to a "grease trap", which is not a "grease interceptor". There is no "flow control" on a grease interceptor.

                  the dog
                  the dog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dog,

                    We might be talking about two different things but I am talking about a flow contro device like the Zurn 1108-L. You might be able to use it on a grease trap but it is made for an interceptor.

                    I also found an article in PM online which talks about contractors not always using flow control devices even though they should.

                    http://www.pmmag.com/CDA/ArticleInfo...,74790,00.html

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Utah,

                      Here's where I'm coming from. And keep in mind I have not done an interceptor in years. Nor do I make any claim to be correct, only my opinion.

                      *The UPC definatly makes a distinction between a "grease trap" and a "grease interceptor".

                      *My interpretation has always been that a "grease trap" was a small mecahnical unit. A "grease interceptor" was a large (the UPC terms it a 750 gallon or more tank) that seperated grease from waste.

                      *I have never seen a "flow control" installed on a "grease interceptor", and have always been under the impression that an interceptor is sized for retention time (see Appendix H in the UPC).

                      * After having read you're typically informed posts, I'm going to contact IAMPO for an opinion. Having re-read the appropriate sections, I'm a little confused as to what the difference between an interceptor and a trap is.

                      the dog
                      the dog

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        dog,

                        I think your right. With the inter-mingling of the terms “grease trap” and “grease interceptor” within the Code it makes the Code ambiguous at best. Then to take it one step further most manufacturers call their grease traps an interceptor.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Or call it an intertraptor.

                          We trap all lines before the grease interceptors and after the grease traps. I don't do a ton of these but thats pretty much the operating procedure.
                          Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Not to confuse things but here is a spec sheet for interceptor put out by Los Angeles County.

                            http://ladpw.org/epd/industrial_wast...nterceptor.pdf

                            Notice the running trap and the comments related to it.

                            Mark
                            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ToUtahNow:
                              Not to confuse things but here is a spec sheet for interceptor put out by Los Angeles County.

                              http://ladpw.org/epd/industrial_wast...nterceptor.pdf

                              Notice the running trap and the comments related to it.

                              Mark
                              Utah,

                              I think we need to look at the entire website you are refering to. Generally, public works only has juristiction over public property.

                              I agree that this issue needs to be addressed in future model codes because I have never realized how confusing it was until this subject came up.

                              I did not have time to call IAMPO today, one of those days, but regardless of the answer, this should be clarified in future codes.

                              the dog
                              the dog

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X