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  • Pipe size to outside spigots?

    After the water meter in my house, there is a 4' vertical run of 3/4 pipe. At that point there is a 90 elbow to a horizontal run that feeds water through a whole house filter. All of the water used by my home goes through that filter.

    For my outside spigots I would like to bypass that filter by cutting out the elbow and putting in a T to run a separate branch for outside. In that case the water meter would feed the T and one branch would go through the filter for my inside use while the other branch would run to both outside spigots.

    Here's my question: should I use 1/2 or 3/4 copper for the outside runs? The spigots are 12" frost free units that have 1/2 male connections on the ends. I was thinking about running 3/4 pipe to reducers at the spigots.

    Any suggestions are appreciated.

  • #2
    If you are going to be running more than 1 outside spigot off of that line than yes I'd say run the line with 3/4" copper. However, if you'll only be running 1 spigot then I'd just use 1/2". You won't be gaining anything by running 3/4" for only one line.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BadgerDave
      If you are going to be running more than 1 outside spigot off of that line than yes I'd say run the line with 3/4" copper. However, if you'll only be running 1 spigot then I'd just use 1/2". You won't be gaining anything by running 3/4" for only one line.

      you will gain water volume by having the 3/4" pipe. if you use 1/2" pipe you will flow 5gpm and 3/4" will flow 7 gpm. even though the hose spigot is 1/2" you will not have as much friction loss with the bigger pipe.
      Charlie

      My seek the peek fundraiser page
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      • #4
        But you'll lose pressure by using 3/4!! Sure you'll have volume but that's it. Why not use 1/2. I don't get that just for two spigots!!
        Last edited by swoosh81; 06-02-2006, 07:05 PM.

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        • #5
          ... one of my primary concerns with the question is water pressure ... that's partly why I want to circumvent the house filter.

          If I run 3/4 and use a reducer (to 1/2) at the end of the spigot, won't the last 12" be under higher pressure.

          I just don't want to make a mistake and have my sprinkler shooting only 3' into the air!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dp
            ... one of my primary concerns with the question is water pressure ... that's partly why I want to circumvent the house filter.

            If I run 3/4 and use a reducer (to 1/2) at the end of the spigot, won't the last 12" be under higher pressure.

            I just don't want to make a mistake and have my sprinkler shooting only 3' into the air!
            The pressure remains constant regarless of the size of the pipe. A 12" pipe will have the same pressure as a 1/2" pipe in a static system. What does change is the volume available through the pipe. The more outlets which are open at the same time the less the volume and then the resultant pressure at the outlet. As long as you are not washing your car with one bibb and watering your lawn with another bibb at the same time pressure should not change much.

            The 3/4" pipe will give you more volume to the bibb regardless of the size of the bibb although the bibb will reduce the volume somewhat the reduced volume will not result in as much loss in pressure at the outlet. The later statement only matters if you have poor pressure to begin with. The non-regulated pressure at my house is over 185 psig so even a 1/2" pipe will supply more water than a 3/4" hose will handle.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ToUtahNow
              The pressure remains constant regarless of the size of the pipe. A 12" pipe will have the same pressure as a 1/2" pipe in a static system. What does change is the volume available through the pipe.

              Mark

              thanks utah i had to go grill some steaks for diner and did not get to finish ,but you hit the nail on the head
              Charlie

              My seek the peek fundraiser page
              http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


              http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

              new work pictures 12/09
              http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for your help, guys. I always know I can turn here and get good information quickly.

                The previous owner of this house was a cheap-o. For some reason all the water lines in the basement were replaced with polybutelene plastic within the last 20 years. It was a scary sight -- in fact, every professional who ever entered my basement said "WTF is that?"

                I ran over 150' of new copper over the winter and put in the filter to control the staining problem from our town water. Now I just want to make the adjustment I mentioned above and I'll be all done.

                Thanks again for your responses.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ToUtahNow
                  . The non-regulated pressure at my house is over 185 psig so even a 1/2" pipe will supply more water than a 3/4" hose will handle.

                  Mark
                  i hope you have 2 regulators to protect your system. plus a regulator for your lawn sprinkler system, especially if it's an automatic system.

                  another point with pressure and volume. as mark stated, static pressure will be the same on a 1/4'' icemaker line or a 2'' water main. you will also lose approx. .47 psi per foot of elevation. then you can deduct for friction loss on the pipe and fittings.

                  oversizing the cold water pipe is fine. oversizing the hot water piping will cause alot of heat loss and wasted time and water waiting for the water to get hot. this applies to hot water piping that is not on a circulating system.

                  also the price of copper is at an all time high, so upgrading 50' of pipe is not bad. 5000' of piping hurts

                  rick.
                  Last edited by PLUMBER RICK; 06-03-2006, 02:17 AM.
                  phoebe it is

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK
                    i hope you have 2 regulators to protect your system. plus a regulator for your lawn sprinkler system, especially if it's an automatic system.

                    rick.
                    Rick,

                    I have a regulator for the house, an RP for all of my outside stuff and a second regulator for my sprinkler valves. So I lose 10 psig through the RP which still leaves me 175 psig at the hoses and I regulate the sprinklers down to 100 psig.

                    I worked on a project out in the middle of the Antelope Valley where the owner claimed a water truck was filling his water tank at a fire hydrant and caused a water hammer which took out all out his sprinkler lines. Of course once the county told me he had a delivery pressure of 325 psig it was easy to see why his non-regulated system was failing.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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