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Trenchless in the Midwest?

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  • Trenchless in the Midwest?

    Hi all! Has anyone had much experience with pipe bursting in the middle of the country? I can see trenchless is the future and want to get a share of it, but wonder what problems, if any, might arise from the fact that many laterals in my area run 8' or deeper? Would this raise any issues? Thanks for any info on "no-dig" techniques.
    "...then there was that dusky gal in Bangkok...real crossway breeder I swear"

  • #2
    Originally posted by rafterq
    Hi all! Has anyone had much experience with pipe bursting in the middle of the country? I can see trenchless is the future and want to get a share of it, but wonder what problems, if any, might arise from the fact that many laterals in my area run 8' or deeper? Would this raise any issues? Thanks for any info on "no-dig" techniques.
    PlumberRick is really the one to talk to you about pipe-bursting. All I can add is I know a guy in Utah who had his mom's house done and it broke up all of the slab in her basement so he ended up replacing the slab anyways. I'm sure he was the exception and not the rule.mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #3
      Roger that. I think the pipe to be replaced needs to be 2.5' from utilities, foundations or slabs because the soil displacement can cause damage. Thanks for the info!
      "...then there was that dusky gal in Bangkok...real crossway breeder I swear"

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      • #4
        rafterq
        with pipe bursting you need to have some luck and some foresight. you also need to have access to the pipe at the start and end of the run. a pre video inspection and location is required.

        while the principles of pipe bursting are quite simple, the results can be quite frustrating. good planning and prep are very important.

        i just did a 52' pull this week and all went well.pulling time 1.5 hours. the main issue was that i personally dug the pulling pit and pre softened the soil. with the amount of force required to split a pipe into the exisiting soil, you need a good firm base and wall to shore up the pulling equipment. you also need the proper soil conditions. the soil needs to expansive.

        the pipe needs to be videoed to locate any tees, changes of directions and start and ending points with depth. a tee would need to be dug up and reconnected after the pull. a 45 degree change of direction will increase the pulling force required. and the depth is very critical as the hole to work in is going to need to be shored up. my machine require a hole 4' long x 2'6'' wide x 6'' deeper than the bottom of the pipe. fortunatly this last job was 5' deep. all hand dug.

        the soil was clay and pre wetting by high pressure injection made for a very nice and easy pull. the way it was suppose to go. at other times i've had chain snap (defective) and ditches start to compress.

        i would highly suggest that you demo any equipment from the co. prior to spending 30-50k. i would also check with real users of this eqipment in your area. there might be a reason why it's not done there.

        hope i've given you something to think about.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #5
          Thanks for info Rick. Thats a lot of info to digest. I appreciate it and will look further into trenchless as I go along.
          "...then there was that dusky gal in Bangkok...real crossway breeder I swear"

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