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  • #16
    I believe the ones at HD are made by Laing. The standard one is an AutoCirc1 with a timer and the AutoCir2 is the newer style where the pump mounts on top of the water heater and the part under the sink is just a non-electric thermostatic valve. The #2 makes it a little easier to get power to the pump. The first time I saw an AutoCirc2 installed I wondered how the heck anyone thought a circ pump on a non-circulating system would work. Then I found the thermostatic mixer under the MB lav and figured it out. I was not able to test it but I sure would have liked to have given it a test run just to see if it worked.
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #17
      PLUMBER RICK...I am really interested in the push button system. Can you direct me to any literature on the product? I'm not quibbling with your opinion of the push button system, but I feel the ability to not have to run tepid water down the drain would be beneficial. As I understood the system, whenever hot water was needed, the button was pushed, the circulating pump came on and "cool" hot water was returned to the hot water tank. When the activated faucet's bypass valve received "hot" hot water, the pump turned off. At that point, the faucet could be activated for the intended purpose and the water coming from the hot water side of the faucet would be 120 degrees, or whatever temperature the hot water heater was set to deliver. Have I overlooked something or I am just misinformed?
      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by FINER9998
        PLUMBER RICK...I am really interested in the push button system. Can you direct me to any literature on the product? I'm not quibbling with your opinion of the push button system, but I feel the ability to not have to run tepid water down the drain would be beneficial. As I understood the system, whenever hot water was needed, the button was pushed, the circulating pump came on and "cool" hot water was returned to the hot water tank. When the activated faucet's bypass valve received "hot" hot water, the pump turned off. At that point, the faucet could be activated for the intended purpose and the water coming from the hot water side of the faucet would be 120 degrees, or whatever temperature the hot water heater was set to deliver. Have I overlooked something or I am just misinformed?
        Here is a link: http://www.gothotwater.com/D%27MAND/how.asp
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #19
          ToUtahNow...Thanks for the information. That is the product I was thinking of. Any thoughts on the payback period for the $300 to $500 investment required?
          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by FINER9998
            ToUtahNow...Thanks for the information. That is the product I was thinking of. Any thoughts on the payback period for the $300 to $500 investment required?
            you'll never payback the money spent on the system.

            what you will save is your time.

            time is money


            rick.
            phoebe it is

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