Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Whole House Water Filter Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Whole House Water Filter

    My house's water supply is from a well. We have tons of sulphur and rust in the supply and I was wondering if there is anything better than a water softener.

    I've perused the internet and found several systems: chemical (would like to stay away from), media filtration systems that need to be replaced every 4 or 5 years, and systems with filters that need to be replaced every couple weeks.

    Does anybody have and recommendations or experience with any system that will benefit my situation. At this point in time, i could care less about price, as long as it is effective.

    Thanks,
    Pete/CMR

  • #2
    It is hard to recomend anything without test results.

    Do you have sulfur in the water? Iron or mangenese bacteria in the water can cause you to get a sulfur odor. They are not dangerous bacteria to humans but the odor can get anoying.

    You may need more then one piece of equipment to solve your problems.


    A water softener is the best way to take iron out that is in the ionic state, clear water iron. The water appears to be clear. It will leave stains behind on fixtures and things mainly from evaporation leaving the iron behind.

    A softener is not effective in removing red water iron. It may reduce it to some degree because the resin bed in a softner can act as a physical filter but that is not the intended design doing so can cause iron fouling preventing the softener from doing what it is suposed to do.

    A softner is not effective for removing sulfur.


    Depending on the quatity of physical iron in the water there are a few different solutions.

    A whole house cartridge filter housing that uses disposable filters solves many peoples problems. If the water has to much stuff in it a cartidge may need to be replaced too often for a home owner to want to pay for or deal with.

    Self backwashing filters have a much larger capicity for particles and clean themselves periodicaly. There are a number of bed media's used in them. Filter ag is a light weight material that is very effective in catching larger particles. Mangese Greensand is heavier and finer and can catch smaller particles. Activated carbon is an effective fliter not generaly used for this purpose unless you have other issues it can solve.


    For the sulfur there are a few different ways of taking it out.

    An activated carbon cartridge filter will remove sulfur from the water and also has a limited filtering capacity. Same applies to a backwashing carbon unit. The quanitity of sulfur in the water is critical as activated carbon does not have an unlimited capacity for sulfur. Both a cartridge filter and a backwashing filter would have to be replaced periodicaly. I wouldn't put in the backwashing filter if it's lifespan wouldn't exceed ten years.

    A chlorination is very effective in removing sulfur from the water. Chlorine can be added by chemical feed or by a housing containing tablets. Either method needs to be followed up with a carbon filter to take the chlorine back out.

    A backwashing greensand filter that regenerates with potasium permangenate will take sulfur out of the water as well. It will also oxidise clear water iron and can physical filter it. Depending on you water this would be the only equipment that could be a catch all solution. Many factors can make it not ideal for your water however.

    Comment


    • #3
      Rainwater?

      Have you considered collecting rainwater and using that?
      Sure there are practicalities involved but it is possible.
      I run my home on rainwater successfully and Ive got 3 teenage girls.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Australian Plumber Josh
        Have you considered collecting rainwater and using that?
        Sure there are practicalities involved but it is possible.
        I run my home on rainwater successfully and Ive got 3 teenage girls.
        Aussie Rick,

        In Southern California we have few to no wells. Our water comes from a few controversial aquaducts (see the movie "Chinatown" for a great but partially fictional account of this system).

        Is your water collected in aboveground tanks? How is it pressurized? Just curious.
        the dog

        Comment


        • #5
          do you need to filter sediment and then sterilize the water with a UV?

          I think over here, rainwater is categorized as raw sewage.

          i'd love to have a comprehensive greenhouse someday.

          very interested in the idea....thanks

          aussie aussie aussie oi oi oi

          Comment


          • #6
            rainwater

            I collect rain water from my roof, which is Colourbond Steel. Basically factory painted sheet steel roofing. www.bluescopesteel.com - custom orb.

            Rainwater stored in above ground tanks and pumped to the house.

            Filtration in a few stages.
            1. Leaf Filters in the Rainheads
            2. A "First Flush" system which diverts the first 30 litres/7 gallons water containing dust, grit etc from tank to overflow.
            3. Strainer on pump inlet.
            4.UV sterilisation and filters to 2 micron.

            Seems to work fine. No discolouration noticeable. I dont filter the water to Garden taps.

            There is a cost involved. But i made the choice on a non economic basis.

            Sydney Water supply is great quality drinking water. As good as the bottled stuff you buy, and it costs about $1.20 / 1000 litres.

            I had the water from my system tested and its just as good. Doesnt have the Fluoride or Chlorine thats added to the supply here.

            CMW, enough with the Aussie Aussie etc. Just kidding. Im proud to be Australian but thats embarrasing. Besides it originated in England!

            Josh

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by plumbdog10
              Aussie Rick,

              In Southern California we have few to no wells. Our water comes from a few controversial aquaducts (see the movie "Chinatown" for a great but partially fictional account of this system).

              Is your water collected in aboveground tanks? How is it pressurized? Just curious.
              dog been called alot of things, but never "aussie rick".

              i'm thinking of running my lawn sprinklers on grey water from the shower and laundry. the laundry uses "he soap". i figure with a proper storage tank and pump, the lawn will really shine.

              any thoughts

              rick.
              phoebe it is

              Comment


              • #8
                Rick, soap is a good mostly natural way to deter bugs from eating your lawn. The problem occurs with the storage of enough water to soak your lawn. I looked into it at my last house and the size of the tank required was prohibitive. IIRC a 30' X 60' area of grass watered with 1" requires about 1300 US gallons

                Comment

                Working...
                X