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  • Anyone done electric pipe soldering?

    I am interested in learning more about the ridgid electric pipe soldering tool. Here's what I would like to know:

    1) Does this form of heating the copper leave any kind of marks...burn marks or otherwise?

    2) Are there any drawbacks to soldering this way when compared to soldering with a torch?

    3) Does soldering via electric gun takes longer to heat the copper than a torch? And if so, how much longer?



    Thank you to anyone who can offer some insight.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Island Plumber
    I am interested in learning more about the ridgid electric pipe soldering tool. Here's what I would like to know:

    1) Does this form of heating the copper leave any kind of marks...burn marks or otherwise? just on anything you happen to touch with the carbon based electroids.

    2) Are there any drawbacks to soldering this way when compared to soldering with a torch? i purchased 1 for a trial basis and like all other gimmics, it's been sitting on the shelf ever since.

    3) Does soldering via electric gun takes longer to heat the copper than a torch? And if so, how much longer? yes it does, approx. 50% longer. plus when you're done, the carbons are red hot and will burn anything they contact.




    Thank you to anyone who can offer some insight.

    if you are still interested, please buy mine

    rick.


    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Rt-100

      1. No burns marks on copper piping.

      2. Yes. You will need electricity. A torch is more portable. The ends are brittle and can break is dropped hard.
      But, you forgot to ask what is/are the advantage(s).
      NO FLAME.
      Which means that you can solder/sweat in more confined areas. Example, replacing diverter valve where access was through a vanity, fixing a leak under a built up platform through a 12" X 12" opening. I have never caught a stud on fire yet with it. I've scorched many a stud with my torch.

      3. Slower, but not by much. Provides a much more uniform distribution of the heat. Easier to master than a torch.

      For a service plumber working on copper in wood frame houses a worthwhile investment.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mark7
        1. No burns marks on copper piping.

        2. Yes. You will need electricity. A torch is more portable. The ends are brittle and can break is dropped hard.
        But, you forgot to ask what is/are the advantage(s).
        NO FLAME.
        Which means that you can solder/sweat in more confined areas. Example, replacing diverter valve where access was through a vanity, fixing a leak under a built up platform through a 12" X 12" opening. I have never caught a stud on fire yet with it. I've scorched many a stud with my torch.

        3. Slower, but not by much. Provides a much more uniform distribution of the heat. Easier to master than a torch.

        For a service plumber working on copper in wood frame houses a worthwhile investment.
        please buy mine. another paperweight on my shelf

        i was lucky, i only bought 1.

        propress= 4 units

        rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Rick and Mark7,

          I remember when "electric soldering" was all the rage, until "propress" came in. I never used the electric system, heard Mark7's argument for it, now I would like to read Rick's arguments against it.

          Be more specific Rick, what do you not like?

          ps. Rick,

          I know you gave up the CAPITALS, so now you have red lettering? How about you just write a post like the rest of us. (Not a newbie, Josh; I reserve this right).
          Last edited by plumbdog10; 09-08-2006, 09:31 PM.
          the dog

          Comment


          • #6
            dog, the color font was used to separate the quote from my answers. look at prior blue post. the red was suppose to be inside the quote.

            with a torch, a pro can controll their heat, flame angle and tpically not burn anything with common sence. also the torch and tank is typically very portable.

            with the electric, carbon based tongs, you now have a set of carbons that are red hot and remain red hot for more than a minute. so what do you do with these glowing tongs? also since they are made from carbon, they are fairly fragile. how many times do you drop the end of your torch on the ground? i've never broken a torch. try this with an electric torch.

            by the way, how many of us pros have ever burnt down a building with a gas torch?

            dog please buy mine and see for yourself

            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Now I'm interested in how well this works. Does anyone other than Ridgid make this tool and how much is it. I'd like to try it out. Lots of times I have to sweat a fitting in a tight spot, and you can't find the soldering asbestos pads they used to have.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK

                with a torch, a pro can controll their heat, flame angle and tpically not burn anything with common sence. also the torch and tank is typically very portable.

                with the electric, carbon based tongs, you now have a set of carbons that are red hot and remain red hot for more than a minute. so what do you do with these glowing tongs? also since they are made from carbon, they are fairly fragile. how many times do you drop the end of your torch on the ground? i've never broken a torch. try this with an electric torch.

                by the way, how many of us pros have ever burnt down a building with a gas torch?

                newman please buy mine and see for yourself

                rick.
                newman same goes for you too


                where in calif.. are you?

                rick.
                phoebe it is

                Comment


                • #9
                  Orange County

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Newman brings up a good point on the tight spots. Propress may also fulfill this need, but may not be acceptable under all specifications.
                    the dog

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Anyone done electric pipe soldering?

                      i know this is a very old thread, but i need to resurrect it.

                      i can see all the arguments between using flame and the electrical type of soldering. i am wondering if i have a prefab set-up of some solenoid valves, roughly 20 at a time, and propress is not an option for the inlet/outlet of these valves, would it make sense to get an electrical soldering tool that i can hit 40 joints back-to-back? i am thinking that the heating of the first joint to the second joint it bettered by almost half the time, will i save on labor when i do this repetitively 20 times over? any help would be greatly appreciated. and if someone was willing to allow me to try this out will the possibility of purchasing the tool, i would be most appreciative. thanks again!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Anyone done electric pipe soldering?

                        kasper, i'm also in l.a.

                        buy mine.

                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Anyone done electric pipe soldering?

                          I don't see the benefit of this, now you need a cord to solder...

                          I have a scrap of sheet metal 6" by about 16", I can bend it, fold it, wrap something with it, etc. etc.

                          I never burn wood when I solder next to it...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Anyone done electric pipe soldering?

                            Strike me down with a boomerang but I have never heard of anyone using electric soldering irons for jointing on pipe. Then again never.....................!!!!
                            i would have thought that you couldnt get the heat let alone constant heat required

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Anyone done electric pipe soldering?

                              it's not a solder iron. it's 2 carbon tongs that spring around the fitting at 180 degrees opposite each other. the carbons get orange / red hot.

                              rick.
                              phoebe it is

                              Comment

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