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  • Gas Pipe sizing

    I was looking through NFPA 54 (National Fuel Gas Code) and there are two tables 6.2a and 6.2b to determine size.

    One lists the pressure drop as 0.3 in. w.c. and the other 0.5 in. w.c.

    All it says about pressure drop is the final pressure should be greater than the minimum pressure required for proper appliance operation. Sound advice

    Which one do you use?

    Is that the right document for residential gas installation? It is only 167 pages long.

  • #2
    Originally posted by rick-l
    I was looking through NFPA 54 (National Fuel Gas Code) and there are two tables 6.2a and 6.2b to determine size.

    One lists the pressure drop as 0.3 in. w.c. and the other 0.5 in. w.c.

    All it says about pressure drop is the final pressure should be greater than the minimum pressure required for proper appliance operation. Sound advice

    Which one do you use?

    Is that the right document for residential gas installation? It is only 167 pages long.
    You're an engineer, but can't figure out what plumbing code you're juristiction is controled by? Figures.
    the dog

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    • #3
      Originally posted by plumbdog10
      You're an engineer, but can't figure out what plumbing code you're juristiction is controled by? Figures.
      yeah but ask me how to navigate somewhere.... in the dark

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      • #4
        how to navigate somewhere?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rick-l
          yeah but ask me how to navigate somewhere.... in the dark
          LOL- I believe he is pointing out not all Engineers are Mechanical Engineers.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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          • #6
            I know how to navigate.....in the dark, and which code is in my juristiction. What I do not know how to do is spell well. (See above).

            My point was to make a simple phone call to your local building department, who will tell you which code to work under. This should be easy to figure out for an engineer, regardless of his/her specialty.
            the dog

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            • #7
              out here, in los angeles and surrounding areas we use the .5'' wc. drop in pressure. we also use 1100 btu to the cubic foot. some use 1000 btu.

              your gas supplier should also have some info along with your local city plumbing code desk.

              rick.
              Last edited by PLUMBER RICK; 08-28-2006, 09:44 AM.
              phoebe it is

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              • #8
                First off, make sure you are looking at the right inlet pressure for what is given downstream of the meter/regulator supplied by your gas supplier. (If you dont know, you should ask the gas provider what the delivery pressure is)

                Then ask yourself what pressure drop you can deal with. Also realize that the lengths are listed as "equivalent length" of the longest run. If you do not understand equivalent length, you should consult a professional for assistance.

                Regards,

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