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  • trim

    ok i have a new feeling towards my brad nailer but.....with installing trim and going back over nail holes with putty/spackle whatever its called, is a pin nailer the best choice for this project ? I will suffice to use my nailer atm as funds are low but im curious as to what nailer /pinner would be good for installing trim. I have 4 rooms to finish trimming and i have store bought pre primed trim. ( sorry again funds , no real wood trim). I am going to build real wood cabinets this summer though . Any suggestion will be helpful.

  • #2
    Re: trim

    I use an 18 gauge nailer to put up MDF casings, crown, and baseboards all the time. Very little (if any) hole to fill. What gauge nail are you using?

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    • #3
      Re: trim

      A 23 gauge pin has no head on it so it will offer almost zero holding power. For this job, a pin nailer would not be the best tool to use. I agree that an 18 gauge brad nailer is the tool of choice for most floor and ceiling trim work.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Re: trim

        i have an 18 gauge brad nailer now. I was just curious as to what is best. I have always used my 18 gauge on trim though. Now to just finish it up and paint it .

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        • #5
          Re: trim

          It depends on what you're working with. 18 GA is fine for the lighter trim, but if you're putting up some larger crown you should use a 15 or 16 GA finish nailer. Usually if it's over 3" crown I'll use 15 GA and for most other trim I like to use 16 GA.

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          • #6
            Re: trim

            If you are going to paint the trim ( I assume you are) 23 pinner is fine. In my experience it holds well for all kinds of trim because you can afford to pop a lot of pins in without them being visible. I use mdf and pre-finished cherry, oak and maple and find it sticks em pretty good. I think they are coated with and adhesive, either for the collation or to make give them more holding power, but either way it seems to keep stuff in place. (Sadly I have had to "unplace" more than one piece of trim after pinning it)

            One other thing is mostly the pinners are 1-1/8" max, with some high end (cost) models being 1-7/8". Finding pins that length is another story.

            PS take with a grain of salt as I love my 23 gauge so much I'd recommend it for framing
            A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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            • #7
              Re: trim

              Originally posted by woodenstickers View Post
              ...

              PS take with a grain of salt as I love my 23 gauge so much I'd recommend it for framing
              Yeah, framing a doll house...

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