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  • Drywall and outlet boxes

    So, I got 1/2" drywall to put up on a customer's wall. What I'm matching to is what looks like 1/2" with a boatload of mud on it. I can match that no problem.

    What's buggin me is the outlet boxes the electrician put in are about 1/4" shy of the front of the drywall. In other words, the outlets are going to be sunk in from the plate by 1/4". At least, that's how I think it all works...shouldn't the front edge of the outlet box be flush with the drywall?
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

  • #2
    Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

    VASandy

    If they are recessed and when you mount a receptacle or switch things don't line up as they should you can put some #6 flat washers behind the device or there are special threaded spacers made if you really have big adjusting issues. Once the box is in and the drywall is up there's not much you can do if the boxed aren't correct. The way to fix it is to add washers or spacers to bring the receptacle or switch out where it should be. It gets a bit wild using washers not to have them fall off the mounting screws. A little (tiny bit) of Vasoline can help.

    I got to go and buy my digital camera and set it up. I'm just to stubborn in keeping my old 35mm film camera but then I have to shoot the roll of film, take it in for processing and bla, bla bla. You know what I mean.

    The rear of the mounting tabs should be flush with the drywall surface when the device is mounted. If you need a few spacers for serious problems maybe you can PM me the PO or RR box of a friend and I'll mail a few to you C/O that person. I have loads of them here.

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    • #3
      Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

      The customer wouldn't let me screw the wallboard in. It's there in a friction fit for now, and the upper board is in place. This is the lower board, and has about 5 receptacles in it. I told her there's ways to mount the outlets flush, but her boyfriend (as if she isn't picky enough, her boyfriend is no help!) said they'd get the electrician out to remount the boxes. I gave up on the argument and will let them deal w/the electrician, who will no doubt mount the things with standoff washers. I'll try and be there w/the electrician this time to screw in the drywall and get moving on the rest of the stuff. Sometimes it's just not worth arguing w/the customer. It's better to let them hear from "the expert" how things work. We'll (the electrician and me) get it figured.
      I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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      • #4
        Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

        The electrician will probably just put the devices in. The outlets and such have tabs that will still hit the drywall unless someone put alot of effort into opening up the outlets. Code requires the boxes be within 1/8 inch of the finished surface. If for some reason the customer or inspectors calls the electrician on that their are box extenders that are a PITA he could use.

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        • #5
          Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

          A box extender in many cases is too thick. What's needed really depends on how much change is needed. Boy is right about the tabs, but they really can't have much pressure load or they just bend or bust off. As far as moving the boxes, that's good as long as they don't end up making a mess of the wall. This is where it would be good to see just what you're working with there. As for their calling the electrician, I think that's wise. Sandy doesn't need to be made to deal with such problems. If someone else messed up let him/her fix the goofs.

          PS: Some people are so *&^%$ in their heads that no one can get along with them. You're best off not trying.

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          • #6
            Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

            Ok, so it's a code issue. That's what I was afraid of. I'll let the electrician deal with it. There's enough other work there that I'd rather not have to mess with moving all those boxes. They are tight to the drywall at least. That shouldn't be a problem, as long as they don't move them up or down, only out. The customer doesn't want to have to waste another 4x8 sheet of drywall just because the boxes aren't mounted properly. there's other electrical hangers that already have to be moved, as the hangers are mounted where they're flush with the drywall.....go figure! Things that have to be buried in the wall got mounted flush!!

            As far as customers go....in my computer business I have a very particular customer that's driving me nuts nitpicking about everything. It's a historical building, used as a museum. I got them networked for free, and am transitioning them to maintenance. This particular customer is now complaining about every single thing that goes on. I'm about ready to cut them off and just tell her to get the work done by someone else. See how she likes the charges my competition will hang on her. I've no need for having to answer a badly asked technical question when I KNOW she can't understand the answer. If she's so technically challenged, she needs to quit trying to control everything I do.

            Ah well...sorry for the rant!!! As you can see, I'm trying to keep myself busy and make money in this little town. Running a computer business and doing side jobs in home improvement may seem rather incongruous, but in fact they do go together. The same attention to detail and sequence of work kinds of things apply.
            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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            • #7
              Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

              I agree with not arguing part. I have done everything drywall for 14 years before i went to woodworking. I cant tell ya how many times i ran into the plug/switch problem . But , im no electrician so they had to get that person back out to fix boxes instead of letting me ise the washers and get a nice finished , safe , switch/box. Me and my dad rewired his whole house and i did the drywall in that. He went back and used washers and it works fine. Just time consuming since it was whole house to check lol. I loathe dealing with perfectionists formerly known as homeowners lol. I have walked off the job and refunded some cash before and will do it again if need be. I mean the homeowner usually does not know what to do and i do as i make a liveing at it. just my two copper people worth.

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              • #8
                Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

                Worst case scenario, there is always the option to switch out to remodel boxes...
                Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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                • #9
                  Re: Drywall and outlet boxes

                  This has me thinking how nice it would be if they made up special wiring devices (receptacles & switches mostly) that were offset for use where the boxes are mounted too far inside a wall. Let's see. The 1/8" and the 1/4" and the 3/8" would be nice. Anything worse and that box is going to be moved no matter what, or a box extender will be added. Hmmm I want to see nice thin box extenders and that aren't such a PITA to deal with. It's time to reinvent things people.

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