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  • #16
    Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

    Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
    Yeah, this is only the preslope. Over this will be the liner, then more concrete, and then tile.

    So I just spread it out with some wood, then smooth it over with the trowel in the slope I want? No need for floats?
    Just my two cents,
    use a 2x4 to rod (screed) it off, then a hand "mag" flaot to close it up.

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    • #17
      Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

      Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
      drtyhands man... you just trying to scare me?
      I did post before I understood that all you were doing was floating for slope.Terminology in the quick view of your original threw me.Is this existing slab on grade? If so MrConcrete's 2x4 and wood float will be fine.Just now saw your question.

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      • #18
        Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

        Yeah, this is being put on a level piece of plywood.

        I built blocking walls all around so essentially I have a wooden box with a drain in it. Then I cut some vapour barrier plastic to the shape of the bottom and stapled it down so the concrete won't sit directly on the wood. Then I cut a piece of steel mesh the size of the bottom, cut out a hole where the drain is, and stapled that down as well. Now I'm ready to put the concrete in and make the 1/4" per foot from the drain sloped floor.

        After that, I've got an Oatey shower liner to put down and clamp at the drain and then will make another concrete floor on top of that which is what will end up tiled.

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        • #19
          Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

          Sounds good W/W.You picked up on the reference to vapor barrier on plywood.I've seen jacuzzi tubs lift after mortar base warped plywood.

          On the drain,hopefully they gave you the two piece drain so you can sandwich the membrane between the two pieces.

          Your doing great.Oh yeah,nice blocking up the wall to provide backing for the membrane

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          • #20
            Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

            Yeah, I put the two piece drain in myself. Same was what used to be there... but the old one broke when I tried to take the screws out of it. I ended up having to cut it off below the floor, then put a coupler down there, then put the new one on. It was pretty annoying. I think I posted about it here a few months back.

            The blocking goes up about a foot and a half or so to support the liner. That's something that wasn't there at all before. the old liner was just nailed to the studs and drooping between them.

            I'll try to remember to take a pic tonight showing where I'm at with this. Looks a whole lot different than it did a year and and 2 months ago when I started.

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            • #21
              Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

              Here's the pic I posted here in December of last year.

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              • #22
                Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

                Your drain looks like one that has three parts,the bottom flange,top flange and then the ajustable grate riser that screws into the top flange.I have not used these before as most of our pans are hot mop tar and the hot mopping contractor won't warranty anything but a cast iron top flange.Does your drain have the weep holes? Sorry,don't mean to appear to be making a mountain out of a molehill.Just trying to cover all your bases and I don't work with Bichuthane membrane.Lot of it in the industry though.

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                • #23
                  Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

                  Don't be sorry! More information is WAY better than not enough!

                  I think I've worked out all the stuff I need to do. It's just a matter of figuring out how to do it now, such as how to actually mix/pour/form the concrete.


                  Remember... that pic is of the old stuff, though the new drain I replaced it with is exactly the same.

                  The drain is as you say. There's 3 pieces. The bottom is permanently attached to the pipe. The flange bolts onto it and has weep holes, and finally the middle part screws in and can be adjusted to whatever height it needs to be.

                  Of course, the weep holes are where the bolts are so the water would have to be a quarter inch high before it will make its way to them. I guess that's normal though. No way around it as it has to be solidly clamped to the liner.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

                    For whoever's interested, here's what it looks like now.



                    The pipe has a cap on it so I could test my joints. I've just drilled a hole in it to let the water out so I can remove the cap.

                    In retrospect, I wish I'd just put a valve on it but I didn't feel like spending the few extra bucks on the valve over the cap.

                    Would have saved me having the water shoot at me when I drilled through it.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Concrete Floor: Float or Trowel?

                      Hey WW,

                      Sorry I just skimmed over the thread and I haven't seen mention of using "mud" not concrete. "Mud" is what we call sand mix mortar that is mixed just wet enough that you can pack it in your hand. That is the only way you are going shape a slope. I use a finish trowel to pack a cut the mud into my slope. I finish with a 2x4 or a piece of tile no bigger that 6.x6 and I make circular motions around the slope. This will allow you to feel any high spots. Also I know this is your pre-mud but this is good practice before you have to do it real. Hope this helps.

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