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  • #16
    Re: window casing/door casing

    cool idea - i always just did it one peice at a time. I will certainly try your method.

    What about door casing where you only have 3 pieces. Any problems falling out of square?

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    • #17
      Re: window casing/door casing

      No problems, just get the top right, and work your way down,with the BRAD nailer or stapler 1st.Then you can nail it to the studs.

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      • #18
        Re: window casing/door casing

        Is there any reason you measure short to short instead of long to long? Also I'd love to hear your technique for crown if you don't mind sharing?

        Was the finger-jointed poplar stained? I have not seen it used with an unpainted finish like that before. Very interesting look!
        A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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        • #19
          Re: window casing/door casing

          Originally posted by woodenstickers View Post
          Is there any reason you measure short to short instead of long to long? Also I'd love to hear your technique for crown if you don't mind sharing?

          Was the finger-jointed poplar stained? I have not seen it used with an unpainted finish like that before. Very interesting look!
          That's just the way i was taught. When you deal with different widths of casing, it's easier to just add 1/2 " rather than add the thickness of casing, plus your reveal, 1/4" each side.It works with any casing,if you know what i mean.
          Here's my technique for running crown: The boss stood by the saw and watched me hang 16' pieces by myself..Good thing daddy made me tall,with long arms. No here's what we really do: He cut everything on compond mitres, laying flat, on the base of the saw. This is the best way to get consistent results when cutting crown. We glued all joints, even butt joints, which also had a very small "nailer" block behind them. We would often have to put 1 side in and bow the other to fit between walls. It's all in reading your measuring tape and communication with your sawman, once you figure the best technique for you.
          As far as i know, no finger jointed wood get stained. There would be big variations in color,as some of the joints are only 10- 12" apart. That pic is deceiving,it was taken much earlier than the rest of those. That room hadn't been painted yet.
          I would love to hear some of y'alls methods of running crown moulding. I often cope my crown, when doing it for myself. Only real difference is a little more patience, and i brad nauil the copes together, no glue. There is not really any surface for glue, when coping.

          Damn, now i wanna run some trim, I've always loved it.!!!!
          Back to building swingsets in the morning. I'm taking the camera,so you guys can see these things. They are very nice!

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          • #20
            Re: window casing/door casing

            I do a lot of crown now a days, but only around cabinets. The material I get is prefinished cherry, maple or oak or else laminated mdf. The biggest I get is 2 1/2" so my 10" miter saw--no slide single bevel--is plenty big. I am usually wrestling with funky ceilings, and again, less than perfect cabinets (I do refacing for a big BIG company) existing in peoples kitchens so I don't use the flat/bevel miter method anymore. I find it easier to use my bevel t square to get any miter measurements if they look like they may be odd and then hold the crown upside-down against the fence of my saw and cut the 45. It works pretty sweet for the most part. If my angle is not quite 45 I can easily adjust it.

            Since I am using pre-finished crown I stain the inside edge of the miters before installing. If the run is small enough I'll pre nail the miters with my 23 gauge pinner first and try to install it pre assembled. I am constantly tweaking stuff since the crown we get is not always straight on top of the ceiling and box issues and I have found that starting with the miters perfect gives me the best opportunity to end up with em that way.

            I use my 23 gauge pinner for installing it too to keep the marks down. I used to be worried about the pins being able to hold up the long runs, but I pin the heck out of it and when I have to pull a piece back down have to wrestle it off, so I feel confident it will stick. With the laminate crown I'll put a blocker strip because that stuff is pretty heavy. I'd like to use 18 gauge brads but with the laminate the holes look like craters.

            I'll post some pics someday, I always forget to take the before or after pics. With my trade it's more about the transformation than the fine results like you have shown, we don't get to do any really fancy stuff. Still, the trim is my favorite part too!
            A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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            • #21
              Re: window casing/door casing

              Sometimes this can be dangerous. I was doing a job last week. Unfortunately it was late and I was getting complacent. Needless to say my brad hit some wild grain and found its way through the end of my thumb and out my thumbnail.

              Moral of the story be aware of your tools, materials and body parts. I was in a hurry to finish and got stupid.

              The method described will yield quality work in a timely manner. One other thing that will help is to put a back bevel on your miters to compensate for irregular drywall

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