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  • Metal Stud Construction

    I am building an office and they want to use metal studs. Are there any good books to help me with its construction? I have been framing for a long time but never have used metal studs. The other thing is the office floor is 2nd story concrete and i was wondering how to fasten the sole plate to the floor. I am afraid if i use anything powder acutated it will wreck the concrete.

    Thank you
    I don't want to achieve immortality through my work... I want to achieve it through not dying.
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  • #2
    Re: Metal Stud Construction

    on Amazon type in "steel framing" and there are a number of books that come up,

    http://www.amazon.com

    Steel-Frame House Construction by Timothy J. Waite
    http://www.amazon.com/Steel-Frame-Ho...6273610&sr=8-1
    Commercial Metal Stud Framing by Ray Clark

    Residential Steel Framing Construction Guide (Residential Steel Faming Construction Guide) by E. N. Loree
    http://www.amazon.com/Commercial-Met...6273610&sr=8-2

    Residential Steel Framing Handbook by Robert Scharff and Walls & Ceilings Magazine
    http://www.amazon.com/Residential-St...6273610&sr=8-3

    those were the first few,
    all the books have a few reviews, you could also try "steel stud" as a search.

    I have used them but the guy I was working with was kinda slap happy, and I have no idea if the way I was introduced to them was correct or not, so I will not comment on the way I was shown on how to build a wall with them,

    I would guess one could use some type of construction adhesive to glue the bottom plate down if drilling or using power fasteners were not suggested, I think near door ways I would pin it some how, regardless,
    Last edited by BHD; 11-28-2007, 02:34 PM.
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    • #3
      Re: Metal Stud Construction

      The bottom(track) is always shot down on my projects.Usually with 3/4"-1" pins,this is in the min.4" concrete.Because the building is a self support structure in itself and the walls you will be installing are non load bearing most jurisdictions will let you frame 24" on center.You only need to frame slightly above your ceiling height wether hard lid or T-BAR.You will need perlins to secure the tops of the walls if you are not going all the way up.The channels for connecting walls are the big difference from wood framing.It is a SLAM stud that is left unscrewed on the perpedicular wall to be screwed as the drywall is being installed.Kindof hard for me to explain,But definately a time saver worth researching.Maybe someone here can explain or you can GOOGLE.

      There are a few different guages.Heavier for supporting lids,tall walls and door jambs lighter studs for fill walls.The self tapping screws are for heavy guage the pointed screws are for lighter gauge.

      Hope this helps.

      P.S. There are some relitavley inexpesive tools you will need.Just ask.
      Last edited by drtyhands; 11-28-2007, 07:25 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Metal Stud Construction

        Nope, you guys don't need me in here no more....

        Maybe I should go back to the Plumbing Forum....

        Ah just messing with you, good answer by both of you...

        Funny thing is, I started out framing with metal studs and haven't touched them in 20 years. Can't imagine anything has really change in the 20 years that has gone bye. Damn, sh!t like that, just makes me feel I'm getting older...

        I got the blues
        Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

        http://www.contractorspub.com

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