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  • A question about floors and joists (old house).

    Hello all. I am planning to install 3/4" x 7 1/8" yellow pine plank flooring in two second floor bedrooms. The subfloor is 1" pine planks covered with plywood. Everything I've read says to install the flooring perpendicular to the joists. But if I do this, the planks will not be running along the longest walls. Would it be a big mistake to run the planks parallel to the joists?

  • #2
    Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

    It would definitely be a mistake to lay it parallel with only a plywood layer.
    If you only had the 1" pine you should actually lay the new floor perpendicular to the sub floor. In your case I would think you could lay the floor in any direction you choose as the subfloor is plenty strong enough to support the floor

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    • #3
      Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

      That's exactly what I was hoping to hear. Thanks!

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      • #4
        Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

        I agree... you'd only run your floor perpendicular to the joists if there were no plank subfloor, or if your subfloor was only OSB, Particle, or Plywood. That material over time will sag and therefore your new plank flooring would have to be perpendicular to the joists. As Mr. Brooks stated, with both the old plank subfloor and a layer of plywood, you should be able to lay the new floor in any direction.

        I just had new hardwood floors put into our future home, and ripped the old oak floor out to allow for the new floor to be laid in the same direction as the original. Otherwise, we would have had to lay it perpendicular to the old oak floor in order to have everything flat.

        CWS

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        • #5
          Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

          CWS
          If the old oak floor boards are in reasonable condition and you can be sure all nails and such are out of them, it might be an idea to run them through a planer and jointer. Then you would have some nice oak for projects. I can't stand the idea of oak boards being made into firewood or mulch. If nothing else they might make some nice butcher block bench tops.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Glommer
          Before you put down the top plank flooring be sure the plywood is both flat and level. If there are any humps or dips fix them first. Be sure to countersink the nails so if needed later the floor can be sanded and refinished. With the planks under the plywood (Hope it's good grade 3/4 plywood) you should be fine running the top planks as you wish.
          Last edited by Woussko; 12-05-2007, 09:06 AM.

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          • #6
            Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

            The only thing I can add is, be sure to place felt paper down before your new floor go gown... Stop those squeaks...
            Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

            http://www.contractorspub.com

            A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

              Woussko and Garager,

              Thanks, we did put down new paper. Unfortunately the floors were in such bad condition that it really was saveable... but that's why we replaced it.

              This house was built in 1887 and I suspect the floors were the original. They had been sanded so many times that you could see a lot of the nail heads. Besides that, it appeared that every previous owner must have changed the location of their TV's or whatever every couple of years. There must have been a dozen or so holes drilled through the floor here and there, and when they took out the old "octopus" furnace, they just stuck plywood, and chipboard fillers in the old grate holes. In addition, back in the 80's they took out the front wall, incorporating the porch into the living room. Which made of a nice big room, but the porch area was carpeted and the old living room hardwood was 1/2-inch lower. Likewise, back in the 30's or 40's (my best guess, by the wiring and structure materials) they had added an additon to the back of the house leaving an obvious seam where the old and newer floors met.

              When we started pulling the old stuff up, it just splintered into pieces, some of it almost shattering. We ended up refitting the heat and return ducts, and relocated a several of the registers, including one that was right in the middle of the stairway entrance. (When you came down the stairs, you couldn't miss it, and I got the feeling that one day I'd just end up in the basement.)All the registers were replaced, getting rid of the stamped sheetmetal louvers. The new floor looks good, especially now that it's all one level and no unsightly straight seams that separated a couple of rooms.

              Frankly seeing all that old floor go to scrap made me feel bad in a way. But with who knows what kind of varnish on them, and the fact that there wasn't a single board that came out in one piece, it's all pretty worthless. What was unbelievable though was the amount of dirt and debris that fell into the cellar. I had completely cleaned everything soon after we bought the place but after this flooring job, I had to pull all the ceiling panels and lights down. Must have been buckets of dust, as I know I emptied the shop vac at least three times.

              CWS

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              • #8
                Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

                CW
                Sounds as if I'm missing a lot of fun there. I love to remodel, I do know what a pain in the ars thing can get. Good thing you didn't have to take down a chimney too...

                New floors make a great impression when someone comes over for a visit.

                How much more remodeling you are doing?

                Good luck on your project, do post some pictures too, everyone loves to see a new project picture or 2....
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A question about floors and joists (old house).

                  My God, these people just never give up.... This is "SPAM" Josh.... How do you say goodbye Mydewalttool. :twofinger2:

                  In case your wondering what the hell I'm yacking about, well there was a spam between my two posts, which I'm sure Josh deleted it out. So not to worry, I'm not trying to bad mouth this thread...
                  Last edited by garager; 12-19-2007, 11:01 AM.
                  Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                  http://www.contractorspub.com

                  A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                  Comment

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