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  • How to raise concrete floor 3"

    During a demo of one of our building we had to remove the tile in the bathroom to discover the cement? underneath was cracking bad. The guys went down 3" to solid concrete. Now what would be the best way to raise the floor up 3" to lay tile on it. The concrete itself is not flat and has raised areas and divits.
    Buy cheap, buy twice.

  • #2
    Re: How to raise concrete floor 3"

    Did you chop into the slab itself or just through the bed of the tile?

    There are a few self levelling toppings out there. ARDIT is one brand used here. But it is has a maximum thickness which to it will work with.

    Alternatively the tiler could use use a thicker sand cement bed under their tile to bring you back to the desired height.

    Now all this could be useless if things are done differenlty in your end of the world.

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    • #3
      Re: How to raise concrete floor 3"

      This article may help you. I have never dealt with residential/commercial building repairs, just bridge and roadway type repairs.

      The rough surface will help bond the new pour to the old. When we have two "smooth" pours on top of another, they are also tied together with epoxy coated rebar. The 3" thick pour does not lend itself too well to tying the two together though. Typical clearances between the concrete surface and the rebar are 2"-3" depending on concrete pour and location. Using a bonding agent will help the new adhere to the old.

      This might also work for you.

      Hope this helps you out.

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      • #4
        Re: How to raise concrete floor 3"

        Just pour a cap on it.
        Use the Red 60 lbs bag of sacrete (you can get it at HD and its a 5000lbs mix). Clean the area and use a bonding glue (they have that at HD as well).
        If you want, you can drill a few small holes into the existing slab and hammer some short rebar stubs to help hold the new pour.

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