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  • Sinking walkway

    Our concrete walkway winds it's way to the front porch. About 13 years ago public water was installed and we had to tunnel under the walk to get the line to the house. Over the years the end closest to the tunnel has sunk about 1.5" and now seems stable. Since it's a tripping hazard I'm wondering what I can do with this. I've considered the following;

    1. Pour concrete over this area and taper back to the proper level. This sounds bad because it will be an obvious patch and the most narrow part of it will eventually spall off.

    2. Have a concrete pumping company come in and raise it from underneath with pressurized concrete. I haven't priced this but it sounds expensive. Also, wouldn't this old walkway (est age at 30 years) be prone to cracking as it is leveraged up?

    3. Bite the bullet and have the whole thing done in pavers, covering the old walk (which doesn't have a single crack in its three secton, 20+ yard length) and fill the defect as in #1 above.

    I'm wide open for opinions and anything that you can see that I am overlooking.

    TIA,
    Chiz
    Later,
    Chiz

  • #2
    Re: Sinking walkway

    I've got the same problem with my sidewalk. Wish they made grey coldpatch. I am probably going to try hydraulic cementer this summer since its pretty deep now and doesn tapper all that slowely up to the normal level. I'm just sick of driving around the low spot every time I drive into my driveway.

    Josh

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    • #3
      Re: Sinking walkway

      You can cut / score the sidewalk with a 7" diamond dry blade on a circular saw, then break it out with a slede, shouldn't be too thick. Then put up forms and mix and pour in new concrete. I am guessing that if you were to take up about 10' to 16' the rise would not be noticed. Or you could take up about 6 feet and have a decent repair. I would not suggest putting concrete ontop of concrete, to thin, will crack, and you will surely notice that type of patch. If you have low spots in the yard, take out the earth underneath and spread it in the low areas then place the broken concrete in the hole to use as fill. Years ago I used a mini excavater to remove my old driveway, placed the driveway in my backyard, then formed around it, footings, etc., then poured the new slab ontop of the raised, fill area, and built my shop. Concrete costs money, I recycle when I can. You may find another use for the old material instead of having to haul it off. I think you have a nice weekend project.

      Good luck,

      Dave

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      • #4
        Re: Sinking walkway

        How many steps is it?

        If it's more than 5 or 6, call a concrete guy that does jacking and check his warranty for cracking and failure.

        Less than 5, just get some estimate for replacement

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        • #5
          Re: Sinking walkway

          Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
          How many steps is it?

          If it's more than 5 or 6, call a concrete guy that does jacking and check his warranty for cracking and failure.

          Less than 5, just get some estimate for replacement

          Sorry to be thick but are you asking how many steps it is from the correct height to the dropped (fallen) joint? If so, I'd say that it's just about 6. I can't say that I've seen anybody around who does jacking. We're a bit rural. There is a pumping outfit for sure. Would that work? DO you know if it's crazy expensive?
          Later,
          Chiz

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          • #6
            Re: Sinking walkway

            My guess is it would be cheaper to cut and jack hammer it out, or sledge hammer it out,
            (rent a bosh electric jack hammer) and after scoring or if there is a crack in an expansion joint) my guess is about a 30 min job if it is for only 6' to 10' of a normal side walk 3' to 4' in width, and re pour the walk you may want to re tamp the area where the trench was to make sure all the settling is done. the biggest charge will probly be for the short charge on the cement truck, (may times if you do not order X amount of cement they will add a short charge). But in some areas they have the trucks that mix on site, and are great for small jobs as there is nearly no wast of cement.
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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            • #7
              The 3 guarantees of concrete

              It's white
              It gets hard
              and it always cracks, no matter how many control joints you put in them.


              You might luck out without getting cracks but it's not the norm.

              Take pictures of the concrete in question.

              Slab jacking is pretty common here in my area. Virgin ground is suitable for a subgrade when pouring concrete but in most cases it is disturbed.

              When dirt is put back in a ditch and backfilled....80% settlement occurs in the first 75 days, sooner if considerable rainfall is involved. From thereon it's takes a while for the remaining 20% to complete compaction.


              Depending on the money......slab jacking is the way to go IF the finish of the concrete is decent, just expect a few holes drilled in the surface to allow pumping of slurry into the voids of the subgrade.

              IF the concrete surface is poor and has no considerable finish that makes for non-slip, tear it all out and get it done right.

              If you are going to band-aid and use a topping, make sure you use Acryl-60, it is a concrete adhesive, the best out there. It looks like milk and you mix it with your concrete topping for repairs. It's basically the best adhesion but expensive. It will last more than one season when cold weather hits and the slabs start to raise and lower.
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              • #8
                Re: Sinking walkway

                There are top coat applications that are available now that can be laid down as thins as 1/4" and have a 5000 psi strength that will lessen the cracking scenario. These are usually used in a decorative case so you could add a stamped paver look, and still save money.

                http://www.stainedbydesign.com/wst_page5.php

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                • #9
                  Re: Sinking walkway

                  Here's what you're talking about......it can be done as a thin layer or done when the concrete is placed.


                  This is my scrap barrel pad Click image for larger version

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                  • #10
                    Re: Sinking walkway

                    Nice looking, Dunbar. What do you mean by a "scap barrel pad"?
                    Later,
                    Chiz

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                    • #11
                      Re: Sinking walkway

                      Originally posted by ironhat View Post
                      Nice looking, Dunbar. What do you mean by a "scap barrel pad"?
                      I think it is the area he puts his scrap barrel on
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                      • #12
                        Re: Sinking walkway

                        How about a picture. We need pictures, please................

                        If there are expansion joints, take two 5 ft steel bars and 2 guys. Get the end of each bar under the slab and pry up the slab. Carefully flipping it over and place some 2"x4"s under it, to keep it up a little, keep the slab in direct line to go back in. Then fill in the low area with sand, tapering it to the high area (no air pockets use straight edge). Be sure to pack it down, even though some people will disagree with sand compacting, anyhow as your tamping it, water it down also. When you get the spot to the right elevation, flip the slab back in carefully. If not better, then redo the steps all over again, I've done this many, many times.

                        Caution, when lifting slab, be sure you don't snap it in half, proper pressure from each side will stop this from happening. Do not try it in the middle only. Also, do not snap your back or drop it on your toes, safety first.
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                        • #13
                          Re: Sinking walkway

                          Garager said, "Also, do not snap your back or drop it on your toes, safety first".

                          Unfortunately, Garager, the back is already toast so I'm going to have to farm this one out. I'm gathering options here so that I can find a contractor with an agreeable opinion. As far as the pics, I'll try to get some tomorrow but it's supposed to be rainy. I'll see what I can do - I can see where it would be helpful.
                          Thanks everyone. I'll post back tomorrow.
                          Later,
                          Chiz

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                          • #14
                            Re: Sinking walkway

                            OK, a day late and apologies to anyone still following this. I could have doneit yestereday - beautiful day - but the kids and grandkids came in from out of town to surprise us and knock off some of the much needed yard and landscaping work. It was all good. Gotta love those guys (sniff!).

                            Back to the deal at hand. The one pic is of the dropped section which is just about 2" low. The second shows the long run downhill for about 30 feet. The concrete is badly stained, a bit course but otherwise solid.
                            Attached Files
                            Later,
                            Chiz

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                            • #15
                              Re: Sinking walkway

                              See? pictures help me understand

                              I don't know why I thought your concrete steps were separating from your house

                              Now I see your problem. I called the city about the sidewalk in front of my house for the same issue. They came and used a concrete grinder to feather it back about 18" on the high side. Gone in 30 minutes. No more tripping hazard. Now that it has weathered a bit, doesn't stand out as much.

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