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  • Concrete boat ramp

    We have lake front property and want to add a boat launch. Making a coffer dam is out of the question. How about pouring 2'x12'x4" slabs and placing them side by side? To keep them from shifting out of level with each other pouring them with a shiplap. If mu computations are correct they would weigh in at 1300lbs which I think we can manage. What do you think the support strength would be?


    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Concrete boat ramp

    Well someone has to say something here. To tell you the truth, this is one I cannot answer, looks to me like you need an Engineer to answer your question. I'm sure I have a formula somewhere in my office/books, that can answer this, but I'm not even going to attempt to find it, sorry about that. Thats not your typical question to find in a forum such as this.

    But what I will do is place this in another forum and see what they have to say. Most of the guys are builders, not masonry or structural engineers. But we'll see what they say anyhow. Sorry, I'm not of any help right now.
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: Concrete boat ramp

      I would think one could "pre cast" use a rebar grid in the slab for reinforcement, may want to put some lifting hooks in it cold be cut off later after setting,

      leave some "holes" in them and one could pound sections of "pipe" rod, other for anchoring them more securely,

      It would probly jsut be easiest and safest to hire a proper loader, fork lift or other lifting machine to set them with,

      but they do tilt slabs and other prefab concrete projects all the time, I do not see why it would not work for a boat ramp,

      ~~~~~~~~~
      jsut did a quick search and this is a little of what I found,


      http://www.wieserconcrete.com/guide/boatramps.html

      this company has drawings of there pre cast ramp planks,
      http://www.americanconcrete.com/comm...boat_ramps.htm
      Drawings
      http://www.americanconcrete.com/comm..._boat_ramp.pdf
      http://www.americanconcrete.com/comm...at_ramp%20.pdf
      I like the tie connector on the units above,

      there are other companies doing this type of stuff, do a Google search and learn from there ideas,
      http://www.google.com/search?num=100...+ramps&spell=1

      you could try launches, pads and other key search words, and may come up with more ideas,
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Re: Concrete boat ramp

        I am in the process of shoreline remediation at our summer cottage. The river has eroded the bank significantly over the years. We decided to do things properly and obtain the required permits from differing state and county agencies, a lengthy but not cumbersome process. Additionally the agencies offered suggestions we had not considered to remedy our problem. No engineering plans were required just some hand drawn pictures of the proposed remediation and some current photos. I don't need to do all that work and have someone turn me in, restore everything I had done only to obtain the permits and redo all the work. It might be worth your consideration to investigate required permits. One of the reasons for the permits is that our deed reads that we only own the land to the high water mark. The state owns the rest. New York State does not have standardized riparian rights laws. In some circumstances the property owner owns the land to the middle of the body of water. The owner on the other side owns his half. But, the state always owns all the water. It can be confusing. Check your deed.

        In the area where our cottage is there are a couple precast outfits. They have seconds, broken planks etc. that they will sell. They will deliver and set them for a pretty cheap price. Way less than for what I could pour the slabs myself. They will give you advice about what type of base is required for the planks to set on.

        If you are insistent on doing this yourself you may be able to do a tremi pour. Make your forms, set them in the water and pour the concrete. Most cement companies will have a tremi available or you can make your own. If there is a predictable water level fluctuation it will obviously be much easier to accomplish this at a low water time. Again because the state may own the water, and you will be mucking it up, you may wish to obtain permission for your project through the permitting process. And again check your deed.

        Or, get some sacrete and some 4 bar. Set the first layer of sacrete bags, reach down in the water and slice the top of the bag open. Next slice the top of the next bag open. Turn it upside down on top of the bag in the water. The sacrete will bond together in sort of a homogeneous pour. Pound the rebar into the bags about every 4 or five inches apart and tie horizontal rebar to the vertical ones. Keep doing that until you have your launch complete. The sacrete will level out somewhat in the bags. It won't be as smooth as finished concrete but it will be adequate for a boat launch. I know this works well because... Isn't there something in the Constitution about self-incrimination. Better stop here.

        Tom

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        • #5
          Re: Concrete boat ramp

          Thanks for the replies. Permits are easily obtained. They allow dock, piers, launches and boat storage buildings out over the water. We have plenty of water frontage as to not block anyone else. Our area is quite rural so finding someone that does this type of precast work is difficult.
          The lake used to fluctuate quite abit but they passed a law last year when the lake hit a record low that they must quit power generation at a certain level (168msl) with normal full pool being 172msl. I need to pour down to about 162msl. The record low was 160msl so I sure missed my chance.

          By the way thanks for the links. I will do some research on the subject.

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          • #6
            Re: Concrete boat ramp

            stew
            the county boat ramp near me has sections like you are planning but it has spaces in between with stainless links between the sections. You being on fresh water could get away with steel or galvi. I'll get a picture this weekend if you want.
            Mike

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            • #7
              Re: Concrete boat ramp

              Hey thanks!
              Pics would be of great help.

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              • #8
                Re: Concrete boat ramp

                The idea of two planks laid side by side will work. You'll need to put a couple of No. 5 bars centered in the slab and about 6" from each side to prevent buckling. The idea of leaving holes about 18" apart through which you can drive some stabilizing rods for anchors is a good one. You could use them for cross-leveling the planks also.
                Let us know how it works out.

                Bill

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                • #9
                  Re: Concrete boat ramp

                  I didn't make it back to the boat ramp this weekend. I will get you the pictures tomorrow night.
                  Mike

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                  • #10
                    Re: Concrete boat ramp

                    I don't think you would need solid links like this one. Chain bolted together would probably be fine for a small private ramp.
                    Good luck
                    Hope this helps
                    Mike
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by myakka; 05-19-2008, 09:58 PM. Reason: .

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                    • #11
                      Re: Concrete boat ramp

                      Thanks for the pics. That is about what I had in mind. It aslo has the benifit of being able to start at the top and work down and being able to extend it as the level drops.

                      Thanks again!

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