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  • LP80 siding

    My 15-year old house has LP80 composite horizontal plank shiplap siding. Just after it was built there was a class action suit whereby L-P had to replace all the siding they had supplied west of the Cascades. Since we live on the dry side we were exempt. That was in about 1993 I think. Today I was moving a potted plant and inadvertently hit the side of the house and knocked a good-sized hole in the bottom plank (just above the reveal). It looks like the siding has turned to dust. I suppose its a fungus. The general contractor who built the house is pushing up daisies and the lumber yard where he bought the material is long gone. That leaves me, the home owners' insurance and Louisianna-Pacific as the responsible parties. Guess who has the shallowest pockets.
    In looking over the siding we find several other places where the paint has bubbled up, mostly on the south and west walls where it's exposed to the summer heat.
    Is this a common problem? Has anybody had any experience in dealing with L-P? According to its website L-P alleges that there is a 25-year warranty on the product. Is it worth the paper it's written on? Is there an alternative to residing the whole blankety blank house? This has really got me worried.

    Bill

  • #2
    Re: LP80 siding

    Bill, you can just replace the boards that needs to be replaced. We have an LP factory right in our town, so you can pretty much say I've been around the junk, yes I said junk. I've only installed it twice, but I have replaced the junk many, many times, now I'll refuse to install that product. The Home Owner can find someone else. The scrutiny of application, LP puts the contractor through, for hanging their siding, is just unbelievable. What they are doing, is trying to put all blame on the contractor if something goes wrong, because this is a bad product, (my opinion and expertise).

    I hate, the stuff. Might as well hang drywall on the outside and expect the paint to save the job. Every cut you make, you must seal it with primer, wait for it to dry, then caulk the seam after you hung it. Unless you have actually installed this material the way the Manufacturer expects, you wouldn't know really what a huge pain in the ars this product really is. Theres a lot of contractors that don't hang it the right way, thus a guarantee failure around the house. It takes way to long to hang this stuff the right way, and no home owner wants to pay out the cost for hanging it the right way.

    And it'll fail, if the nail heads bust through the surface or you scratch the surface, then you must caulk that too, or you void warranty. I'm sorry to hear that you have this material on your house.

    Bill, just replace the boards that are bad, if the boards are near the bottom of the house, closest to the ground, paint all sides, this will help it last longer. Man bill, this was almost a rant and rave post for me. But thru all my griping I hope I gave you the right answer, you were looking for. Did I mention, I hate that product, hahaha, have a good day Bill..... Mark (Garager)
    Last edited by garager; 05-18-2008, 01:12 AM.
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: LP80 siding

      I've never heard of this stuff. Is it some sort of particle board? Looking to get new siding on my house and want to stay away from crap like that. James Hardie Plank still higly recommended?

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      • #4
        Re: LP80 siding

        Plumbers Crack,
        LP-80 is a composite made from wood fiber and God only knows what else. It was sold by Louisianna-Pacific in the 90's as the best thing since sliced bread. The only trouble is that the binder (whatever it is) looks like chocolate cookies to a variety of fungi. Wherever they can penetrate the surface of the board all they leave behind is sawdust. It's about the same consistency as flour.
        I Googled Class Action suits and siding and discovered that L-P isn't the Lone Ranger when it comes to trouble with composite siding. Among the names I recognized are Boise Cascade, International Paper, Simpson Timber and a few others. I don't remember hearing Hardie, but then again there's lots of other stuff I don't remember, too.
        Although it sounded like a good idea at the time I'd have to be pretty desperate to do it again.
        Haven't contacted L-P yet so I don't know what their reaction will be.

        Bill

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        • #5
          Re: LP80 siding

          I've had to repair this siding before too.I figured out a little trick,to get the siding out from under the good board above it.I took a 3/8 or 1/2 inch pipe and sharpened one end,so it would cut a hole around the nails.Then drove the nails in,and pulled the siding out from under.You have to seal the hole ,to stop more problems.Caulk it very well.A friend just turned me on to using car bondo for patching,well almost anything.It dries very fast,sands great and paints good.Ohh sticks to everything.
          If you choose not to decide,you still have made a choice.

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