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  • Bathroom Remodel

    Hi there,
    I'm doing a bathroom remodel and have a few questions. I want to skim coat the walls (new drywall) and ceiling (old plaster) to create a really smooth surface before priming and painting. I have lightweight setting joint compound powder (90 minute). Is this ok to use or should I use lightweight general purpose compound. I went to the local big box store and found only giant tubs of the general purpose stuff. I could get a smaller tub of the regular general purpose instead. I read that it should be thinned a bit. Can I do this with the premix? Also for the ceiling should I roll it on? It seems like it would be easy for it to drip everywhere if it's thinned out and put on with a trowel.

    Second I used Hardibacker around the shower and ended up with an uneven gap above the tub (saved the old tub, levelled it up as much as possible, but it's still not perfectly level). The gap gets as big as 1 inch. Normally I understand a 1/4" gap gets caulked, but what should I do with a gap this big before I tile?

    Thanks for any help. I posted on a different forum, but didn't get any answers. If you have an idea for a better (more appropriate) forum for this stuff feel free to let me know.

    Thanks, Jimbo

  • #2
    Re: Bathroom Remodel

    Originally posted by ssjimbo View Post
    Hi there,
    I'm doing a bathroom remodel and have a few questions. I want to skim coat the walls (new drywall) and ceiling (old plaster) to create a really smooth surface before priming and painting. I have lightweight setting joint compound powder (90 minute). Is this ok to use or should I use lightweight general purpose compound. I went to the local big box store and found only giant tubs of the general purpose stuff. I could get a smaller tub of the regular general purpose instead. I read that it should be thinned a bit. Can I do this with the premix? Also for the ceiling should I roll it on? It seems like it would be easy for it to drip everywhere if it's thinned out and put on with a trowel.

    Second I used Hardibacker around the shower and ended up with an uneven gap above the tub (saved the old tub, levelled it up as much as possible, but it's still not perfectly level). The gap gets as big as 1 inch. Normally I understand a 1/4" gap gets caulked, but what should I do with a gap this big before I tile?

    Thanks for any help. I posted on a different forum, but didn't get any answers. If you have an idea for a better (more appropriate) forum for this stuff feel free to let me know.

    Thanks, Jimbo
    We do some bathroom remodeling as far as the tub goes we usually use a durabond 45 as it sets up hard and fast . you run into the gap with tub and showers because of the tile flage on most tubs, we just run the green bord to the flange itself and then fill the rest with the durabond

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    • #3
      Re: Bathroom Remodel

      If you're going to skimcoat the entire bathroom, then you're going to do a lot of sanding, so you should stick with the lightweight compounds - they sand much easier.
      The premixed buckets are convenient, but they take a lot longer to dry. If you don't have the time, go with the dry mix.
      Yes, the pre-mixed buckets will be smoother if you add a little water and re-mix. Which is kind of funny, because if you're getting out your drill and paddle mixer and some water, you may as well have started with the less expensive dry mix in the first place.
      Last edited by Dairylander; 06-26-2008, 10:49 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: Bathroom Remodel

        Is it a mistake to skimcoat the whole thing? Will primer keep the joints and such from showing? I just figured that skimcoating was a good idea to create a uniform thickness.

        Thanks again for the help.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bathroom Remodel

          If your joints have inconsistencies, the painting process will only enhance them. There is a drywall-specific primer that has a thicker viscosity that will help smooth out the joints, but bathrooms must be painted with semi-gloss or high-gloss top coats to inhibit mold growth, and these types of finishes will greatly enhance the inconsistencies.
          New drywall shouldn't need a skim coat - just go over the joints with another coat of mud using a very wide knife. Feather it out wide, sand it smooth and the joints disappear.
          It is common for ceilings to be a different texture than the walls, so if only your ceiling is plaster, I wouldn't worry about trying to match the textures of the ceiling to the walls.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bathroom Remodel

            Originally posted by nikanone
            The basement stairs to the house has a reallyu high ceiling and it's painted a horrid shade of dirty pink. Even with an extension on a roller, I cannot reach it. And how would I even get into the corners? My tallest ladder is not tall enough and it's scary to consider trying to lean the ladder against the back wall setting on one of the steps. How do painters reach a really high ceiling when directly below it are steps leading down?
            There are pretty long extensions. I think my painters just used extensions, which was the smart thing to do.

            The other way I have seen is that if you have an extension ladder to get these things that make two adjacent steps even and lean your ladder against the side wall.

            A third way, which my dad and I did many years ago is to build a platform out of 2x4s and a sheet of plywood that would span something like 6 steps. It had a lot of mass and wasn't going anywhere, and provided a flat work surface that we could put a pretty big ladder on.

            As far as the corners, I do think there are painting pads that will fit on an extension which you can probably do the corners with.

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            • #7
              Re: Bathroom Remodel

              Originally posted by cpw View Post
              There are pretty long extensions. I think my painters just used extensions, which was the smart thing to do.

              The other way I have seen is that if you have an extension ladder to get these things that make two adjacent steps even and lean your ladder against the side wall.

              A third way, which my dad and I did many years ago is to build a platform out of 2x4s and a sheet of plywood that would span something like 6 steps. It had a lot of mass and wasn't going anywhere, and provided a flat work surface that we could put a pretty big ladder on.

              As far as the corners, I do think there are painting pads that will fit on an extension which you can probably do the corners with.

              CPW, I do tend to think that the guy above you is a spam...
              Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

              http://www.contractorspub.com

              A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bathroom Remodel

                Originally posted by garager View Post
                CPW, I do tend to think that the guy above you is a spam...
                Its his first post, your probably right. I don't see a link at the bottom, I can't even figure out what he is trying to sell.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bathroom Remodel

                  Originally posted by cpw View Post
                  Its his first post, your probably right. I don't see a link at the bottom, I can't even figure out what he is trying to sell.
                  You don't see a link, because I think with the new software came some spam filters, like not being able to put up links right away.

                  It's ok, now everyone knows you are just a nice guy
                  I love my plumber

                  "My Hero"

                  Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Bathroom Remodel

                    As far as sanding goes,I am doing a house built in 1912.All walls are plaster and are in good shape.I floated the walls with bucket mud.I took a 5" orbital sander and duct taped a wet vac to the outlet. worked like a charm.You can also use the ridgid pipe,and reach the top of the wall.Prime, then i used 20 min quick set to patch any places that i missed Sanded,Primed the patches,then painted.Very happy homeowner! Ohh i also used construction adhesive on any holes,and drilled holes and glued and screwed loosed plaster back to the lath.Kinda like adding new keyways to the plaster.Removed the screws and floated.
                    Good luck.
                    If you choose not to decide,you still have made a choice.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Bathroom Remodel

                      Originally posted by Dairylander View Post
                      If your joints have inconsistencies, the painting process will only enhance them. There is a drywall-specific primer that has a thicker viscosity that will help smooth out the joints, but bathrooms must be painted with semi-gloss or high-gloss top coats to inhibit mold growth, and these types of finishes will greatly enhance the inconsistencies.
                      If you are talking about what I think you are the product at Sherwin Willimas was called Hi Build primer not sure at the other stores, but the purposed was to elimanate the paper on the dry wall from absorbing water latex primers and paints and waving. It is only to be used on new drywall and has to be sanded after applying. It was a hard sell to most people, but we have a few customers use it when they where painting with satin or semi gloss and it looks much better than primimg with cheap flat paint.
                      And correct you must use at least a satin finish for bath rooms or a bathroom specific paint. Those usually only come in satin, but if a flat is offered it not a true flat.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Bathroom Remodel

                        Topper is much smoother and sandable. Easier to work with. Buy it in the box. Less money. Sand with a pole sander or block. You want it flat.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Bathroom Remodel

                          Ugh. Too much sanding. I have taken to using a textured wall finish. I always spray the primer and then back roll it. Then I put on a base color. Let it dry and go over the base color with a texture roller of your choice. You can tint this color usually one shade lighter or darker to allow it to stand out more.or you can use the same color on your texture roler. This hides the imperfection NP. Check out your local building and paint supply. You may be pleasntly surprised

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