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  • exterior paint preparation

    I understand the perparation is the most important step for exterior siding paint work. But do I need to get rid of ALL old paints from the wood sidings? Even some of them still look good and cannot be easily scrapped off? One of my co-worker told me I have to make ALL sidings showing bare wood. Is it true? thanks

  • #2
    Re: exterior paint preparation

    It is ideal to get all the paint off and down to the bare wood and even fine sand the woo with 150 grit. But come on thats really not going to happen. Realistically we need to scrape off everything we can and wipe down the trim with a dampened rag.

    It sure would be nice if you could also sand, but it really comes down to how much effort your going to put into the work. After all your scraping and sanding and wiping down, you need to put on a very good primer.

    My recommendation is Zinnser Bullseye 123 (one two three) Primer, 2 coats will get you longer in years, then you can paint with your house paint.

    Never paint in direct sunlight, this will cause blistering pockets and cracking. Never put it on too thick, keep that even coat going on. But the #1 thing not to do, is painting in direct sunlight. Move around the house as the as the sun catches up to you....

    Who else wants to chime in about techniques???

    PS... I like oil based primer and then latex paint, some others like latex all the way....
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: exterior paint preparation

      the majority of my painting has been on out buildings barns and granaries and such some house work but not as much,

      For out buildings I will used a high pressure washer and either a rotating 0 degree head or a 15 degree straight nozzle,

      the rotating one is aggressive, and can tear up the wood but the loose paint flys, and by it rotating one can get and lift off paint that other wise may not lift off,

      the straight nozzle is less aggressive, but I find one may need to make 4 to 6 passes at the paint to get the loose off, up, down right and left, and some times repeats,

      when your dealing with houses some times a pressure washer is to aggressive and can force water into the walls of the house depending on the siding, and such.

      I also usaly try to scrape the building as well to knock off any lose paint the washer missed, sometimes while wet and then after it drys as well, most of the painting I deal with is 80 to 100 year old oil base paints that many times have chalked nearly away that has been top coated with latex, and the latex is sticking fine to the oil base but the wood is giving up the oil base after the latex has been put over the top of it, most buildings in our areas are not painted when they should be they are painted when there 50% bare again,
      in the pictures is one of the barns we did a few years ago, at one time this was the largest barn west of the Mississippi river, the fork lift had a 30' lift ability and with the pole gun extended to 12 foot, I was still jsut able to reach the peak reaching above my head,
      this was oil base barn paint that was being applied here from Sherwin Williams, the oil base does not build up as nice as latex does, but this was the customers request. it was and is good paint, on this job we did three barns and house and some other buildings,
      The customer wanted the windows painted as he keeps his bees in the building in the winter time, as one can see the wood in some areas is really weathered, I did my best to talk him into putting tin on the building but he wanted it painted, we went through about 150 gallons of paint on the entire farmstead painting this barn an nother barn, a bee barn, a shop, two or three sheds, the two story house, and some other,

      but getting back to the preparation remove all lose and any thing that you think will become loose in the future.
      Attached Files
      Last edited by BHD; 07-29-2008, 07:33 PM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #4
        Re: exterior paint preparation

        I don't know how to enter the websites so you can click on them from within a message body and be taken there. If you Google 'moisture content painting wood exterior' one of the hits will from a site called bnet and an article will be brought up entitled
        'How Dry is Dry?' The article explains moisture content of wood and the appropriate paint to use, alkyd or acrylic, based on moisture content.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: exterior paint preparation

          If you live in an urban area it may be illegal to pressure wash paint off siding. The argument is that with this type of paint removal it's tough to contain the chips which then contribute to lead in the soil.
          Getting everything down to bare wood is ridiculous, but a good sanding will reduce the "alligator skin" appearance of siding that occurs when there are many variations in the number of layers of paint.
          I think an oil primer is a better sealer of bare wood, but for a repaint I would use latex for everything because I hate the solvents necessary for cleaning oils.
          And if you try to avoid painting like I do and want to cheat a little, you can get away with only priming the bare wood that you expose.
          The Zinnser that Garager mentioned comes in both latex and oil base and is my favorite too.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: exterior paint preparation

            I am now a certified lead abatement supervisor. H.O.s are not forced to check for lead paint in our state as well as many others, unless Govt. financing is in play. Being that I am certified, if I disturb paint, I must send in a sample before I can advance. Whether this is a painting job or a remodel. This also goes for old wood floors, old hand railings, old doors, old varnish has high level of lead also.

            Pressure washing peeling paint, well I used to do this but not no more. I have my reasons and this would become a topic that I don't want to get into.

            So, just take precaution with your paint chips. If your house was built before 1978, try to capture all the chips, place it into 6 mil plastic bags and take it to a hazard facility. And you should be wearing a cover suit and respirator. Also, don't track the stuff into your home.

            These paint jobs just aren't that simple to do no more. Wait till you'll have to remove all your fiberglass insulation. In a few more years, this will start to happen. Heavy conversation, this one can become......
            Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

            http://www.contractorspub.com

            A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: exterior paint preparation

              Garager,
              The lead I am relatively familiar with through all the HasMat courses I have taken, but removing fiberglass insulation? Please don't leave us hanging on this.

              Tom

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: exterior paint preparation

                I have mentioned this once before. Our Govt. is having studies being conducted about Fiberglass Insulation, well Fiberglass period. Like Lead, when Fiberglass is inhaled, it goes straight to the lungs and stays there. Only very fine particles will get into the blood stream and attach itself to your other organs.

                Your body will not rid of Lead, it is a strong possibility that Fiberglass will be just as bad, if not worse than Lead. The studies will be presented from our Govt. fairly soon. Where I received this info was from my lead training Teacher.

                Since your body cannot remove these from your system, it will just keeps on building up and up. There is a darn good reason to wear a respirator mask when placing Fiberglass Insulation in your walls and attic.

                Our Govt. keeps on approving materials for the building industry, even though there is reason to believe this will effect our healths in the long run. Our Govt, has known about lead paint and its hazard, yet chose to ignore this. Now us tax payers are lucky enough to pay for this clean up.

                Damn near every single home in America has blanket insulation in it, imagine the cost to clean this one up. Our children and our health can be effected if we don't understand these situations and learn how to protect ourselves...

                So it sort of goes like this, our Govt. puts our health at risk and even death can occur, and then makes us pay for the clean ups. Yep....
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: exterior paint preparation

                  So Garager, is fiberglass like asbestos where it's not dangerous unless disturbed? Meaning it's safe while it's in the walls, and only dangerous during install/removal?
                  I've tried to source the recycled denim insulation, but in my area it costs three times that of fiberglass. Even on a small job that can really hurt a bid.

                  http://www.greenjeansinsulation.com/company/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: exterior paint preparation

                    Garager you for got about the part that then the lowers then sue the producing companies out of business by massive Class action suits, even tho the Government Approved even encouraged it use, and in many times was a large revenue accuride via taxes,
                    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                    attributed to Samuel Johnson
                    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: exterior paint preparation

                      Originally posted by Dairylander View Post
                      So Garager, is fiberglass like asbestos where it's not dangerous unless disturbed? Meaning it's safe while it's in the walls, and only dangerous during install/removal?
                      I've tried to source the recycled denim insulation, but in my area it costs three times that of fiberglass. Even on a small job that can really hurt a bid.

                      http://www.greenjeansinsulation.com/company/
                      Ok your first & second sentence, correct.

                      We will find ourselves suiting up in remodels and enclosing all work area in plastic, just like lead abatement/asbestos projects. Removing all particles of fiber and replacing with a different type of insulation. Cost of the projects, just quadrupled.

                      Originally posted by BHD View Post
                      Garager you for got about the part that then the lowers then sue the producing companies out of business by massive Class action suits, even tho the Government Approved even encouraged it use, and in many times was a large revenue accuride via taxes,
                      You very right about this.... So true......
                      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                      http://www.contractorspub.com

                      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                      Comment

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