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  • Framing question

    We have an existing screen porch 14x20 which, as far as I know, has been there for at least 20 years through Albany, NY winters. I would like to talk my wife into remodeling part or all of it onto a three season room. The roof rafters are 2x12x16, 16" OC. Front header is made of two 2x10s, with no plywood between, on top of one 2x4 layed flat. The studs are 2x4s spaced approximately 30" apart with the front edge even with the outside of the porch floor

    The question I have is, would it be advisable to double up the 2x4 studs? Replacing the 2x4s with 2x6s doesn't seem like it would add anything since the major part of the roof load is resting on a 2x4 beneath the 2x10 header. I will however replace the 2x4s with 2x6s and double them up them if necessary. I would like to maintain the 30" spacing or something near it, if possible, to maximize window area.

    As far as I know the porch floor has never moved but before I do anything I plan to check the depth of the footings. If the porch floor has moved I might not have noticed it because of the screens. But with windows if the porch floor moved they may crack.

    Thanks,
    Tom

  • #2
    Re: Framing question

    Tom I see what your post is saying now. Yes, I see no problem with what your talking about. Your front porch has had to gone thru an inspection already, so it must be considered structurally sound, designed and built correctly, and inspected...

    But your statement about the footings makes me wonder if theres ever been an building permit pulled for an inspection.

    I would though, get your building inspector over there and have him look at your project, this should happen when you go to get your permit. You must present a scope of work and a drawing, then he'll check out the job site before a building permit is issued....
    Last edited by garager; 07-30-2008, 04:05 AM. Reason: I read OP wrong, re answered
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: Framing question

      Tom I may have read your question wrong, right now its been a long day and I'm kind of brain dead. I'll leave that post up, because I wanna reread it in the morning as well as reading your post too. I gotta hit the sac, I'm done here...

      The post above was changed....
      Last edited by garager; 07-30-2008, 04:06 AM.
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Framing question

        I feel better now Tom, I'm refreshed. Sorry I gave a wrong answer in my OP because I did read it wrong, yep I was brain dead and needed sleep. It was a very long day and evening for this guy. I had more of soccer on my mind. I coach youth 12 boys soccer and last night was our first practice.
        Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

        http://www.contractorspub.com

        A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Framing question

          the reason for the 2x6 walls i believe is for the insulation. My parents built their house in the early 80's, when the code changed (mid construction) they needed to put foam board insulation on the inside walls to up the 'R' factor to current regs from 2x4's to 2x6's and you will also want to go to 16 O.C. vs the 30 or else your wall board will pull off the wall i believe

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          • #6
            Re: Framing question

            Garager,
            Thank you for rereading and reposting your answer. Our house was owned by a reputable builder and I have never seen any shortcuts made by him. I am certain he pulled the required permits when he added the screen porch. He was an up front kind of guy who did everything by the book.

            Involvement in youth activities is a great way to make a contribution to society. To witness their enthusiasm and seemingly boundless energy is exciting. Through your coaching they will learn to make decisions involving sports and they will carry that decision making process with them and be able to infer it to other venues through out their lives. I believe you when you say it is tiring but in the long run society as a whole will be a better place because of your efforts.

            Thank You,
            Tom

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            • #7
              Re: Framing question

              Wrench Spinner,

              My concern in switching from 2x4s to 2x6s was primarily for strength. My plan is to maximize window area, ideally floor to ceiling, thus wallboard is not an issue at this juncture. However, as we discuss the potential remodel enlargment of the kitchen has popped up, so... who knows what the final product will look like. Through the years I have learned that it is best for me to consult my wife and then just go ahead with projects. She won't object or at least hasn't so far. She was four years trying to make a decision on what type and brand of replacement windows to buy. She was two years making a decision on what kind of car to buy. I finally had enough of the car business and went with her to try out yet another one. We took it home for the weekend and returned to the dealership on a Monday. She was hemming and hawing in the salesmans office when I took out my checkbook and made a check out to her for $10,000. I said, "You have five seconds to make a decision. If you buy this car the check is yours. Four. Three." She snagged the check. If you value your sanity do not get involved with an academician, they can't make decisions worth beans.
              Tom
              Last edited by Tom W; 07-30-2008, 07:47 PM.

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              • #8
                Re: Framing question

                Originally posted by wrench spinner View Post
                the reason for the 2x6 walls i believe is for the insulation. My parents built their house in the early 80's, when the code changed (mid construction) they needed to put foam board insulation on the inside walls to up the 'R' factor to current regs from 2x4's to 2x6's and you will also want to go to 16 O.C. vs the 30 or else your wall board will pull off the wall i believe
                A house is so much stronger and quieter due to 2"x6" walls. Slam a door on a 2x4 wall then slam one on a 2x6 wall, wow what a difference. 2nd floor will shake on a 2x4 structure, 2nd floor on a 2x6 structure barely even feel it...

                But I do believe you are right, they moved on to thicker walls for a higher R factor...
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment

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