Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Fixing doorframe Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fixing doorframe

    This is one of my recent bathroom remodels. The problem is that the old splash went upto the doorframe and the installers cut a notch in the frame. The new splash does not go up to the frame. The cutouts in the door frame need to be fixed as well as the walls where the old splash was.

    I’m not sure what to do about the frame. Is it possible to patch it in a way that can conceal the cutouts or does it need to be replaced.




  • #2
    Re: Fixing doorframe

    Originally posted by blue_can View Post
    This is one of my recent bathroom remodels. The problem is that the old splash went upto the doorframe and the installers cut a notch in the frame. The new splash does not go up to the frame. The cutouts in the door frame need to be fixed as well as the walls where the old splash was.

    I’m not sure what to do about the frame. Is it possible to patch it in a way that can conceal the cutouts or does it need to be replaced.
    Since you have painted trim, I would think that you can do it with a small block of wood, some wood filler, and sanding.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Fixing doorframe

      Originally posted by blue_can View Post
      This is one of my recent bathroom remodels. The problem is that the old splash went upto the doorframe and the installers cut a notch in the frame. The new splash does not go up to the frame. The cutouts in the door frame need to be fixed as well as the walls where the old splash was.

      I’m not sure what to do about the frame. Is it possible to patch it in a way that can conceal the cutouts or does it need to be replaced.




      My .02 here, it looks to me that the frame and area are/is painted white. Im thinking of fashioning a piece material to be painted and cover the hole. Situation is the boss without seeing the whole picture it is tough to decide. Is ordering a longer splash out of the question?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Fixing doorframe

        CPW, you beat me to it, great minds I guess.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Fixing doorframe

          In a bathroom, only one way to go -- waterproof materials, especially with a backsplash involved. Use Bondo on the wood trim where it's cut out. Shape it to match the wood. Then a ROS or a detail sander to make it all look real nice. Then paint it to match the wood. If you're careful here and pay attention to what you're doing, you will never ever be able to see the seam where the Bondo meets the wood. Now, if there is anything above the backsplash (appears to me there might be an issue there, but I could be mistaken), use Durabond 90 or some other Durabond product. It's Portland Cement based and is impervious to water. Will set up like a rock and not shrink. Especially stable in this kind of wet environment. Sand it down a bit after it dries and paint it to match the walls. Good luck.
          Jim Don
          PS, the Bondo is waterproof too and won't shrink. Is available at Home Despot, Menards, Lowes and other big box stores, along with auto supply stores. You can even buy small cans now for little patches so you don't have a quart of the stuff sitting around gathering dust. Once you use it for wood work though, you'll wonder how you ever got along without it. Also great for filling trim screw holes or nail holes in exterior wood work projects like brick mold.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Fixing doorframe

            Thanks for the replies. I was thinking about using wood and filler also - I was not sure how well it would turn out. As for ordering a longer splash - I actually made the top and splash so I can order a longer one from myself .... But the reason it is shorter is that I did not want it to overhang the ogee edge and since there is another splash on the other side I wanted symmetry. There is nothing above the splash - just the wall that was covered by the old splash which was a little taller.

            I will post a full picture also.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Fixing doorframe

              Here is the larger picture - this is actually a small 1/2 bathroom

              Old top



              New top




              Thie doors at the bottom are the ones I posted about on the woodworking section (for those who followed/contributed to that thread)

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Fixing doorframe

                Replace the trim, it looks to be 2 pieces. To me it looks like 2 Ranch style trims and one of them was ripped to about 1 1/4' -1 1/2" wide, that's the only one you need to deal with. Use a razor blade and cut the paint seam and pry loose, then replace. A picture of the entire door frame would be nice so I could see the entire profile of whats going on, because that sure looks like a strange trim job.
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Fixing doorframe

                  That's interesting - I never thought it could be two pieces - I though it was one piece with a goove. But it could be two pieces. The inner piece has a small bow to it and the outer piece is flat so I'm not sure that were from the same material.

                  Here are a couple more pics - kind of hard to get good pics with it being white and the flash at close range.






                  Since cannot go far back due to the size of the bathroom so I cannot get the door in a single pic.
                  Last edited by blue_can; 08-01-2008, 07:11 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Fixing doorframe

                    Originally posted by blue_can View Post
                    That's interesting - I never thought it could be two pieces - I though it was one piece with a goove. But it could be two pieces. The inner piece has a small bow to it and the outer piece is flat so I'm not sure that were from the same material.

                    Here are a couple more pics - kind of hard to get good pics with it being white and the flash at close range.






                    Since cannot go far back due to the size of the bathroom so I cannot get the door in a single pic.
                    You last picture looks like its a one piece trim with a rounded V grove, but I'm not positive, to hard to tell and I even blew up the picture.

                    The tear out looks to me like its saying a one piece trim, but I'm not 100% sure. So you have your other options as was suggested.

                    Even if you were to replace the trim, you'll still have about a 1/2" gap between the back splash and your trim, to me it will look funny, but to most people, they wouldn't even notice. I would still replace the trim, find one or have one made, or replace it all on that side. It'll look better then a patch job that could go wrong.
                    Last edited by garager; 08-01-2008, 08:31 PM.
                    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                    http://www.contractorspub.com

                    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Fixing doorframe

                      Yes, there is one place where the notch goes upto the groove and I looked carefully with a flashlight just now and it does look like solid wood there so I guess it is a one piece trim. But I guess replacing the whole trim would look the best although I would have to notch the new trim in the right place to account for the front edge. I agree about it looking funny - the whole design of the vanity with the door plus the edge that I put on the stone makes it a bit awkward. I could have easily made the splash all the way to the existing cutout but I thought the overhang would look funny and also I would have to make the splash on the other side the same length to match and that would look funny also. I think the 1/2" gap would be the least funny of all the options.

                      I've never replaced door trim - how is it taken out.
                      Last edited by blue_can; 08-01-2008, 08:42 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Fixing doorframe

                        Take a sharp blade (utility knife) and cut the paint between the trim and the jamb board and the trim and wall and at the top in the miter cut slot. With a stout (thin) putty knife/scrapper start prying it out at the bottom (move onto a pry bar if you need to), use a backer piece so you don't dent nothing. Slowy keep prying going up, don't be in a major hurry and work your way up, then do it again.

                        When you get to the 45* miter cut, chances are the top pointed corner is nailed together. You may want to cut the trim and force the upper trim away from the door, to your left, not so much towards you, keep wiggling it and hopefully it'll pop right off. If its nailed both directions at the top, be very careful, take your time...

                        You could try to save the old trim to use it as a pattern, even where it is busted out will still give you a great idea of where to start you cut out and how deep into the trim you need to go. If you need those measurements, do so before you take off your trim....

                        I have a 3" wide stout scrapper, that is thin. This is what I use for taking off trim, 99% of the time, I don't need a backer block....
                        Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                        http://www.contractorspub.com

                        A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Fixing doorframe

                          Thanks garager - I thought the whole door frame including the trim was one piece but loooking at it closer I see that the trim probably pulls off the rest of the frame.

                          Couple of other questions

                          - for the new trim is it glued into place or are mechnical fasteners used (staples/nails). Cannot see any signs of either on the existing trim.

                          - any suggestions for where to look for trim - do the big box stores like HD sell them.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Fixing doorframe

                            The new trim would be nailed on. Typically 18 gauge nails into the edge of the jamb and 16 gauge into the jack stud behind the trim. But use whatever you've got on hand. The nail holes are then puttied/sanded/painted, which is why you can't see them on the existing trim. Glue is only used on top at the miter joint.
                            I think you have a rare profile of trim and probably won't find it at a box store. If you have a real lumber yard / mill shop in your area you'll have better luck.
                            If you want to cheat a little, here's a trick I sometimes use:
                            Walk around the house and see if there's a doorway with the same trim stock that you can steal from. Prime candidates are the inside of closets, basement doorways and garage doorways. Anywhere that it doesn't matter if it looks bad. It helps if the doorway that you're stealing from is a bit taller than your bathroom doorway, so you have an eighth of an inch to play with. The two pieces of trim swap places and no one is the wiser!
                            If you've never removed/installed door trim before, this bath doorway might be a bit conspicuous for your first attempt. It would be a shame if the trim replacement job ended up being more obvious than the original problem. But compared to a custom granite vanity, this should be a cake walk.
                            Good luck.
                            (and don't forget the "after" pic!)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Fixing doorframe

                              Cool - thanks guys. Definitely will post an after pic. Apart from the trim I also have to repaint the walls to conceal the areas which were covered by the previous splashes and I find touchups never work unless you have the original paint - however close the match - it still shows. I will also be getting some custom stone switchplates made out of matching stone. This is hard to do myself - there are companies out there that make them on a stone CNC machine. I just have to send them the cuts of stone from the leftover slab pieces.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X