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  • wood filler or putty?

    want to fill these nail holes. Should I use the wood filler or painter's putty?
    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...egoryID=500029

    http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...10000003+90039
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: wood filler or putty?

    Neither,
    make sure they're countersunk, mix up some two part Bondo, fill and sand smooth. Then paint.
    Jim Don

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    • #3
      Re: wood filler or putty?

      Heard Bondo few times but cannot find Bondo in local Homedepot, Lowes and ACE stores.

      how about wood hardener + wood filler?
      http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...9&ddkey=Search

      http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...egoryID=500029

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      • #4
        Re: wood filler or putty?

        I like the wood hardener first before filling with the Bondo. I'm surprised you can't find Bondo anywhere. Have you tried an auto supply store? Any Checkers, Auto Zone, Napa, etc. will have it. Lots and lots of carpenters and others have sworn off wood filler because it doesn't stand up as well as Bondo. Bondo is completely waterproof, water resistant, etc. etc. It won't let water past itself, period. Once you get it and try it, you'll never go back. IMHO, the wood fillers just don't do the job anymore. If you want to go with something that's really Bomb proof, go with a JB Weld (especially for metals), or go with the Power Epoxies that have the Kevlar strands in them. These are the ultimate fixers for wood products. There is also a pro brand named Abatron that you can try, but that is supposed to be pretty close to Bondo. You're probably wondering why I like Bondo so much? No I don't sell it. But I have used it, over and over and over again on customer's projects where they didn't want to spend a ton of money to rebuild a small wood rot problem in a door frame or brick mold or a window sill. I chip out (sometimes useing a router bit in a Dremel) the rotted stuff. Lay in the wood hardener and let it dry and then fill it with the Bondo. I go back years later and the Bondo looks like I just put it in. The rot has stopped, the seal is good and the homeowner is happy because I did a repair for a little amount of money rather than a ton of bucks. Don't get me wrong, like in your windowsill, you need to pull that puppy out and rebuilt the whole thing. And I won't let a homeowner think that a big repair job is good to go just by slopping some bondo in place. If it needs to be pulled apart and replaced with real wood, I tell them that and strongly urge them to do it that way. If they choose to ignore me, I can't guarantee them that the repair is going to hold. I have a pretty good reputation with the people I work for and I want to keep it that way, so no Mickey Mouse stuff and then I disappear. I keep my customers for a long time because they know I stand behind my work. This is probably more than you really wanted to hear about or read, but just my take on some of these repairs. Like Tinmack told you on that rotted fascia stuff. You've got to take that stuff down piece by piece, cut some new stuff and rebuild. no easy answers there. Big thing again -- prime all six sides before you put it back up PITA, but if you don't that stuff is going to start to rot again from the inside out and you'll hate yourself for skipping steps. If I think it is in a place where it might really be subject to a good dousing with water, I'll even go so far as to prime and paint the backside of a piece just to make sure water isn't going to damage it over time. And seal it all up with a good silicone, and paintable caulk. Cut your caulk tube to make a SMALL bead and just put in a small amount as you go. Go back, wet your finger and spread it out and it will fill in just perfectly and not look like a Nazi Kaulker (which I admit to being on more than one count) did the trim work. And have fun when you do this stuff. It's not a chore. If you need to take a day to get away from it, go fishin and forget it for a day. You're not doing it for a client, so what's the rush. When you can stand back and say, wow, that looks really nice, you know you dun good.
        Cheers,
        Jim Don

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: wood filler or putty?

          Although Bondo is often used in such applications, it is not ideal for wood repairs. Bondo (polyester resin) is not flexible enough, and as the wood shrinks, the repair will often fail. If you want a permanent lasting repair, use the proper wood repair epoxy formulated for architectural restoration.

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          • #6
            Re: wood filler or putty?

            Here is an example of a restoration kit

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            • #7
              Re: wood filler or putty?

              It ain't that big of an ordeal, use painters putty, this will work just fine.
              Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

              http://www.contractorspub.com

              A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: wood filler or putty?

                I'm often having to repair broken screwholes in doors and jambs at this apartment complex. (Got rid of lots of destructive tenants)

                I find that the epoxy putty is the easiest and best way to handle the job.

                I tried wood filler and it's way too soft after it sets.

                I've even rebuilt big breaks around the latch holes of doors using this putty. Works terrific. It's available in the paint departments of Lowe's or Home Depot. Also found in department stores, auto supply stores and Ace.
                If it ain't broke, I haven't seen it.

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                • #9
                  Re: wood filler or putty?

                  I agree with Garager!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: wood filler or putty?

                    Originally posted by OnTheJob View Post
                    I'm often having to repair broken screwholes in doors and jambs at this apartment complex. (Got rid of lots of destructive tenants)

                    I find that the epoxy putty is the easiest and best way to handle the job.

                    I tried wood filler and it's way too soft after it sets.

                    I've even rebuilt big breaks around the latch holes of doors using this putty. Works terrific. It's available in the paint departments of Lowe's or Home Depot. Also found in department stores, auto supply stores and Ace.
                    Glue and a golf tee, sets up in less than 30 minutes, more like 15 minutes with titebond II glue. Very old trick and I have used it 100's of times for stripped out holes.....
                    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                    http://www.contractorspub.com

                    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: wood filler or putty?

                      good call on the golf tee tip
                      Jack McManus
                      Schumacher Homes

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: wood filler or putty?

                        Instead of golf tees I cut blocks of wood on the bandsaw making square pegs of different sizes.Then its litterally gluing a square peg and driving it into a round hole..Old trick I learned from a old timer boat builder.Its very easy to do.
                        Sam

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                        • #13
                          Re: wood filler or putty?

                          Originally posted by threecreeks3 View Post
                          Instead of golf tees I cut blocks of wood on the bandsaw making square pegs of different sizes.Then its litterally gluing a square peg and driving it into a round hole..Old trick I learned from a old timer boat builder.Its very easy to do.
                          Sam
                          This is what I did for nail holes I want to reuse them

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                          • #14
                            Re: wood filler or putty?

                            For screw holes we have used tooth picks and wood glue same idea as the golf tee. My mom used to use it to repair chairs whose joints have come unglued also.

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                            • #15
                              Re: wood filler or putty?

                              Originally posted by threecreeks3 View Post
                              Instead of golf tees I cut blocks of wood on the bandsaw making square pegs of different sizes.Then its litterally gluing a square peg and driving it into a round hole..Old trick I learned from a old timer boat builder.Its very easy to do.
                              Sam
                              I think I will try this around the house,alone with bondo.
                              Kenneth Collier
                              Maintenance and Sewer

                              P.O. Box 9441
                              Jackson, MS 39206
                              (601) 613-2678 (Cell)
                              drainman881999@yahoo.com

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