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  • Dryer Duct

    My dryer is ducted to the garage and causes me much problem with rust on my tools and also makes it very hot to work when it is on.
    The present duct is in the wall of the garrage only 2 feet from the dryer.I have two options on how to run the new duct.
    1. I can run the duct from the wall where it enters the garrage along the back wall and over to the west wall of the garrage and then I will have to cut through brick venieer to install a vent.
    2. I can run the duct up into the attic above and over to the west wall and out through siding. I would have to be careful to make the turns no more than 45 degrees.

    The total run would be no more than 25 feet for either method.
    The problem with option 1 is that I will have to move the storage cabinets out from the wall to make room for the duct, which is not really a biggie.
    I have seen (on line) a fan that can be installed on the duct that will assist the one in the dryer. The motor is turned on by air movement over the blades and the motor is not in the airflow.
    Do any of you have suggestions.
    Thanks James

  • #2
    Re: Dryer Duct

    I think the professional plumbers need to chime in on this one. Me personally, I wouldn't go no higher then 6' with a dryer vent. But I guess this would all depend on the dryer size, oh wait a minute, I'll shut up and lets get the plumbers talking here.... Come on guys chime in....
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: Dryer Duct

      Why do you have to be careful to use 45° bends? You should deduct from your allowed overall length about 2.5 ft for a 45 and 5 feet for a 90, but other than that I don't understand your statement regarding using 45s. You should have a clean-out in any riser section of duct IIRC.

      Don't allow sheet metal screws or other fasteners to penetrate the duct and be sure you have the duct flowing in the right direction to avoid having lint buildup in the duct and creating a fire hazard.

      Technically this falls under the Mechanical Code not plumbing but the guys here will have some insight on how to run this.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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      • #4
        Re: Dryer Duct

        I had read on line that the 45 made the air flow better than a 90 that was the reasoning I was using.

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        • #5
          Re: Dryer Duct

          Originally posted by harrison2119 View Post
          I had read on line that the 45 made the air flow better than a 90 that was the reasoning I was using.
          Well, that is true from a flow restriction perspective. Doesn't make it flow better, just less resistance if you can use a 45 in place of a 90. As I said in my previous post, the Rule is deduct 2.5 ft for each 45 and 5 feet for each 90 from the allowed duct length, but this is a rule of thumb and may vary by manufacturer and your local code.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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          • #6
            Re: Dryer Duct

            lenght limitations for dryer ventscombined horizontal and vertical lenght of 14 ft including 2-90's. 2 ft shall be deducted for each 90 in excess of 2

            approved flexable connectors not more than 6 ft. may be usedin CONNECTION with domestic dryer exhausts system

            flexable shall not be concealed , shall have smooth interior surface

            this info from the 2000 U.M.C.
            I read this to say 14ft with 2 90's--- 10ft with 4 90's 20ft with6ft flex and 2 90's- 16ft with flex and 2 90's ya'll agree?
            Last edited by frodo; 08-18-2008, 03:38 PM.
            sigpic
            30+ years as a plumber
            6 years in the Air Force

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            • #7
              Re: Dryer Duct

              I looked at HomeD and Lowes and I saw two types of flexible hose and neither was completely smooth. One is flimsy and the other is sturdy but not completely smooth on the inside. Where do you get flexible that is smooth.

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              • #8
                Re: Dryer Duct

                You don't. You should be able to get 5 foot lengths of about 30 gauge duct though. Use foil tape not duct tape on your joints they'll last longer.
                If you go beyond the suggested limits, your dryer may take longer to dry, and the pipe may get hotter because the air flow is slower, so watch how close you are to any combustibles. Don't be up against any gas line fittings either.

                Most good hardware stores carry a duct booster fan, but usually they're 6" and aren't designed for this. You can get (Tjernlyn, Fields Controls) fans that will let you go almost as far as you want. The trick is figuring out what activates them. Do you put a timer switch that you turn on when you turn on your dryer, or electrically connect it to your dryer switch, or use a gas pressure switch on the gas valve? Not all that practical, but with enough money there's always solutions. Hire someone if you get that far.
                sigpic3:00, I mean 5:00, and work is done. Time to crack a cold one.

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