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Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

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  • Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

    Two questions regarding my porch project:
    1) Is the manual Bostitch nailer worth the money (I know you can get used ones and refurbs which I'll probably do)? Do they work well with hardwood tongue and groove?

    2) The foundation for the porch is enclosed (cinder block foundation) and I was wondering if a vapor barrier is really necessary? The original timbers were looking pretty good overall, so I question whether a vapor barrier was even really necessary?

  • #2
    Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

    I am guessing your referring to the bostitch, flooring nailer, Bostitch MFN200.

    for many many years the manual units was all that was avable, and if your dealing with 3/4 in thick flooring it should do fine, if your dealing with thinner flooring, you may have to get a different base plate, or a different brand, such as portanail, or Powernail http://www.powernail.com/POWERNAILERS.htm

    some other brands models are convertible to be able to face nail as well by changing bases,

    a vapor barrier, would be wise regardless,
    most recommend a 15# asphalt felt between sub floor and finish floor,

    and usually recommended by any installation guide,
    http://university.floormall.com/install-index.php or https://www.nofma.org/Portals/0/Publ...d%20Floors.pdf
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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    • #3
      Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

      Originally posted by keqwow View Post

      2) The foundation for the porch is enclosed (cinder block foundation) and I was wondering if a vapor barrier is really necessary? The original timbers were looking pretty good overall, so I question whether a vapor barrier was even really necessary?

      Is it necessary? Of course it is......

      Enclosed foundation? Meaning you have no air vents. You better check your codes on this, because in a Northern climax it is necessary to have air vents and I'm sure its probably the same all over the states.

      It is code to have air vents here in MN.....
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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      • #4
        Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

        Well for the porch there won't be a subfloor and finish floor. The 3/4" Mahogony tongue-and-groove will be nailed directly to the framing. In one instance where there was an open air porch being constructed I did see that their vapor barrier consisted of 4ml plastic laid down on the earth under the porch and they used pea gravel around the outside edges to hold it down. I would appreciate more insight into this issue......

        Where would one go to find out more about the local building codes and the specifics on vents? The previous structure had no venting. It probably wouldn't be too difficult to build venting into the framing structure sitting on top of the concrete wall to satisfy this requirement......

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        • #5
          Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

          Originally posted by keqwow View Post
          Where would one go to find out more about the local building codes and the specifics on vents? The previous structure had no venting. It probably wouldn't be too difficult to build venting into the framing structure sitting on top of the concrete wall to satisfy this requirement......
          It probably makes sense to start with your town building or code enforcement department. At least in my part of NY, every town is its own little fiefdom and there isn't necessarily any consistency between one town and another.

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          • #6
            Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

            Originally posted by keqwow View Post
            Well for the porch there won't be a subfloor and finish floor. The 3/4" Mahogony tongue-and-groove will be nailed directly to the framing......
            How do you plan to get the end joints to line up over the joists?

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            • #7
              Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

              How do I plan to get the end joints to line up? I've got joists at measured distances so I can but the end of one board up against the next over the joist? Basically nailers....just like they did it for many many years on the 100 year old porches you see on the old houses........

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

                Here is a description of what I've got.....(I won't bother to tell you the joke that was in place by the previous guy)....so I have the house, and coming off of the house is an enclosed three wall cinder block foundation (original to the old porch). My plan was to mount 2X8 pressured treated boards on the top of the cinder block wall as a "protective layer" between the cinder blocks and the untreated framing of the porch. For ease in description, the porch is 35 feet long across the front of the house, and comes out from the house 8 feet. My framing design consists of 8 foot joists coming from the house to the front of the porch foundation (dropping 1/4" per foot) spaced 68" apart. The three joists in the middle of that framing will be doubled 2x8s for added stability since that is where the majority off the traffic on the porch will be. Then I will have 2x8 nailers/blocks running parallel to the house the entire length of the porch, set at 24" on center. The tongue-and-groove will be installed like the old porches, in that the boards will run perpendicular to the side of the house (away from the house), but instead of running them all the way out to the front edge of the porch, I will probably have two boards butted against the ends, running parallel to the house on the front edge of the porch (that way, the most exposed boards can easily be replaced if ever need by, rather than having to replace the ends of all of the others.....)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

                  Originally posted by keqwow View Post
                  Here is a description of what I've got.....(I won't bother to tell you the joke that was in place by the previous guy)....so I have the house, and coming off of the house is an enclosed three wall cinder block foundation (original to the old porch). My plan was to mount 2X8 pressured treated boards on the top of the cinder block wall as a "protective layer" between the cinder blocks and the untreated framing of the porch. For ease in description, the porch is 35 feet long across the front of the house, and comes out from the house 8 feet. My framing design consists of 8 foot joists coming from the house to the front of the porch foundation (dropping 1/4" per foot) spaced 68" apart. The three joists in the middle of that framing will be doubled 2x8s for added stability since that is where the majority off the traffic on the porch will be. Then I will have 2x8 nailers/blocks running parallel to the house the entire length of the porch, set at 24" on center. The tongue-and-groove will be installed like the old porches, in that the boards will run perpendicular to the side of the house (away from the house), but instead of running them all the way out to the front edge of the porch, I will probably have two boards butted against the ends, running parallel to the house on the front edge of the porch (that way, the most exposed boards can easily be replaced if ever need by, rather than having to replace the ends of all of the others.....)
                  You need to know your codes and have a building permit, so this is to be inspected and you can have a chit chat with your local building inspector.

                  First off, you need to put in J Bolts at every corner and with in 6' through out. Then you have to put down a sill seal before your pressure treated goes down. Drill holes thru the treated lumber to let the J Bolts pass thru. You do not need to use a 2"x8" for this 6"s will do, the wider your sill plate is, then a good chance your board will want to cup and snap.

                  House end must have a ledger board and steel brackets to except the floor system, outer end the floor system stops 1 1/2" from the edge to allow for a Rim Joist which support the floor system from twists and keeps them aligned right. 16 apart for your floor Joists, you do not need to add more Joists if you are putting in blocks, these blocks will transfer the weight from one joist over to the right side and left side.

                  Even if your using a hardwood flooring you should place those blocks at 16"s also. Also your ledger board needs to be fastened with structural screws or minimum 1/2" lag screws w/washers. Plastic on the ground at a minimum 6 mil in thickness. I like the plastic on the ground, because this protects the floor system as well as the flooring and I bank the plastic up the walls and staple to the under side of the outer edges of the floor system.

                  Vent code for your size porch should be one at each end for cross ventilation. Minimum height off the ground is a code you need to find in your area, mine is 18"s if I recall right.

                  Ok, thats enough for now. If your not a builder, then you better get your codes figured out, for 2 reasons. State requires all builds to be at their code requirement and Insurance purposes....
                  Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                  http://www.contractorspub.com

                  A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

                    I've all ready got the ledger board mounted with lag bolts/washers. I understand standard construction being joists at 16" on center, but this doesn't exactly work if you are building with tongue and groove in the old style....with boards projecting away from the house. 16" on center joists would work fine with tongue-and-groove boards running parallel to the house, but that is not how I want to build it. So, since the cinder block foundation is all ready in place...how the heck is one supposed to use J-bolts? I was considering expansion bolts instead....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Rebuilding porch: Bostitch nailer Q and vapor barrier?

                      If your cinder blocks are already filled in with cement, drill the holes 6"s deep at 3/4" in diameter fill with appropriate epoxy and place in 1/2" threaded rod.

                      If holes are still open on top of cinder block, pack hole to the depth of cinder block with news paper, fill with cement and place your J-Bolt into the wet cement.

                      The old ways were not always the proper way and most of the old ways will not meet the minimum requirement of an Inspection.

                      How about showing a few pictures of your project, pictures are worth a thousand words. Heres a heads up, in my state you open up a wall, that wall must be brought up to code, all electrical and plumbing and fire resistance, etc, etc.
                      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                      http://www.contractorspub.com

                      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                      Comment

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