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  • regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

    I know the new ACQ lumber is extremely corrosive. I read that the old CCA treated lumber isn't nearly as corrosive. I used regular nails when toe nailing some studs into the 25 year old CCA treated lumber bottom plate. I already put up the siding. I was wondering if I should go back and remove the regular nails and use hot dipped galvanized. How corrosive is CCA lumber in a dry location? I heard framers used to use regular nails in the old days by mistake (forget to change the nails).

  • #2
    Re: regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

    I have read that the ultimate best nail to use is stainless. Hot dip should be OK too.


    Cactus Man

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    • #3
      Re: regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

      Hot dip would be just fine, and should you do this, absolutely I would. You don't need to pull any of the old ones out, just nail in the new ones....

      But to tell you the truth, I've yet to see anything fall down from using regular nails, but not to say it hasn't happened some where. Framing nails are thick, but I have demoed stuff where there is only about 1/64th of the thickness left after its been rusting for years. Eventually everything will fail/fall down, its only a matter of time, unless you do your upkeep, it'll last a lot longer then....
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      • #4
        Re: regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

        Originally posted by garager View Post
        Hot dip would be just fine, and should you do this, absolutely I would. You don't need to pull any of the old ones out, just nail in the new ones....

        But to tell you the truth, I've yet to see anything fall down from using regular nails, but not to say it hasn't happened some where. Framing nails are thick, but I have demoed stuff where there is only about 1/64th of the thickness left after its been rusting for years. Eventually everything will fail/fall down, its only a matter of time, unless you do your upkeep, it'll last a lot longer then....
        Was the corrosion due to water/moisture on the bottom plate or the CCA pressure treated lumber? When I pulled the old suds out, there was minimal corrosion, but I could not tell if they were galvanized nails originally.

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        • #5
          Re: regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

          I would not got through the trouble to remove siding to re-shoot the studs unless the bottom plate was in an area periodically or continuously exposed to moisture. I always use PT and galvanized nails but to go back and tear apart something I would have to weigh the benefit vs. cost. I have not seen any studies to show how fast the nails corrode. If this was on an exterior deck or critical load bearing beam I would. My guess is that your wall will last as long as the wood lasts. Was the bottom plate wet and rotten or dry and in good shape?

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          • #6
            Re: regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

            It was dry and in good shape. I don't think water gets to it. I am also going to caulk the gap between the siding and foundation. I just read that CCA can be corrosive, but it isn't nearly as corrosive as the newer pressure treated lumber.

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            • #7
              Re: regular nails used in CCA treated lumber

              From what I hear, don't be worried about corrosion on the new pressure treated lumber, be concerned with the preservative washing away and the wood rotting. That's what would ultimately screw up your nails.

              Older wolmanized lumber is/was much better than todays pressure treated.

              On any new projects exposed to ground contact/weather/ like decks, etc., I would look at cedar or juniper. No nasty stuff leaching from the pressure treated lumber into the ground.
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