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  • Drywall corner question

    Hey everyone,

    I've got a question about installing drywall in a "specially" framed inside corner. Basically, to allow for a decent sized region to insert insulation, I didn't double up the stud o
    n the end of a framed wall for the corner; in other words, I have a nailing edge right at the corner edge for one wall, but not for the perpendicular wall.

    At the time I didn't think much of it (they're just partition walls...), but now I'm wondering if it's going to yeild a loose corner which will crack in time
    -- one wall is screwed right at the edge. The perpendicular wall is screwed to a stud very close to the wall; less then 6" away. Will this yeild a strong enough corner? Would it be wise to use one of those metal corner pieces in this case? I know they're typically meant for outside corners, but it seems like it would be useful in this case (or maybe not...?).

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Jeff




  • #2
    Re: Drywall corner question

    It sounds like you've already hung the drywall, so this may not help. I usually add a nailer if it's greater than 3-4 inches from a joint. You don't need to add a whole stud on the perpendicular side, just screw about an inch of a 1x4 onto the outer edge of the corner 2x and the remaining part will be flush with the perpendicular wall. This also happens with walls where the top plate is parallel with the joists. This is very common when I'm drywalling on framing that was done by a DIYer. I usually go around the area with a screw gun and a handful of 1x4 before I start hanging any drywall.

    If it's already up, 6 inches may work OK anyway. They do make metal inside corners with the paper attached that might help prevent cracking. You could also try bedding the regular paper tape with the "mix it yourself" compound. The easy sand 20, 45, or 90 is the number of minutes you have to work it before it sets up. Those compounds dry faster, but also dry harder with less tendency to crack. Just use it for the bedding and first overlay coat - it doesn't sand as nicely as the premix.

    Jim

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    • #3
      Re: Drywall corner question

      Originally posted by jhill3264 View Post
      It sounds like you've already hung the drywall, so this may not help. I usually add a nailer if it's greater than 3-4 inches from a joint. You don't need to add a whole stud on the perpendicular side, just screw about an inch of a 1x4 onto the outer edge of the corner 2x and the remaining part will be flush with the perpendicular wall. This also happens with walls where the top plate is parallel with the joists. This is very common when I'm drywalling on framing that was done by a DIYer. I usually go around the area with a screw gun and a handful of 1x4 before I start hanging any drywall.
      Thanks Jim; I'll have to actually measure the distance -- you think 3 - 4" is acceptable?

      I've hung the bottom pieces of drywall (hanging horizontally); that's when I noticed the problem. I could probably cleanly break the vapour barrier above the sheets and try to slip in a nailing edge in behind with my narrow/right-angle drill then tape the barrier back up again; I likely wont be able to screw in the very bottom, but Several screws along the way, and possibly some glue, should ensure it's pretty rigid and in place.

      --Jeff
      Last edited by carbonBased; 01-05-2009, 03:59 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Drywall corner question

        If you want to renforce the corner and not go back into the poly go to your local drywall supplier, not home depot, and ask for some 2" x 2" angle(HD would only carry 1.5" x 1.5" angle at best). It is commonly used in commercial steel stud construction. slip it behind the drywall on the one side and screw it in. Don't be shy use a screw every foot. this is the tricky part. When screwing in the second side start at he top of the first horizontal board. Hold the angle for the first scres and screw in the board. Work your way down 12 inches at a time, be patient, it takes a second for the screw to start in the steel angle. Always tie your corners together, otherwise you will get cracking. A taped corner offers no structural integrity and cracks will inevitably appear.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Drywall corner question

          Pull off the drywall and add a proper nailer.
          Get a book on framing techniques.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Drywall corner question

            Originally posted by Dairylander View Post
            Pull off the drywall and add a proper nailer.
            Get a book on framing techniques.
            Yep, do it right, that won't be your place forever.....
            Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

            http://www.contractorspub.com

            A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Drywall corner question

              Two words, "expandable foam! Drill some holes and fill that pocket with expandable foam, should be pretty stable once it cures. If you don't want to remove the whole board you could just cut to the center of the stud near the corner and then frame the corner and fill in a piece of sheetrock. These suggestions are coming from a DIY'r, a professional would take it down and do it right.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Drywall corner question

                Originally posted by Faboo View Post
                If you want to renforce the corner and not go back into the poly go to your local drywall supplier, not home depot, and ask for some 2" x 2" angle(HD would only carry 1.5" x 1.5" angle at best). It is commonly used in commercial steel stud construction. slip it behind the drywall on the one side and screw it in. Don't be shy use a screw every foot. this is the tricky part. When screwing in the second side start at he top of the first horizontal board. Hold the angle for the first scres and screw in the board. Work your way down 12 inches at a time, be patient, it takes a second for the screw to start in the steel angle. Always tie your corners together, otherwise you will get cracking. A taped corner offers no structural integrity and cracks will inevitably appear.
                This should work fine in a residence since most inside corners are not subject to abuse like outside corners

                Comment

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