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  • Insulating Pole Barn

    A plea for advise...

    I have a pole barn built by what I assume are standard methods. Poles, horizontal 2X4's with steel siding on the outside etc. I want to insulate it and wonder if my idea is good or bad?

    It has a concrete floor, but there are small gaps where the steel butts up to the concrete. My plan for that, is to fill the holes with spray foam insulation (Great Stuff??) Then I thought about attaching 2" pink styrofoam on the inside of the 2X4's, leaving an air gap between the styrofoam and steel siding.

    There won't really be any air flow through the gap, although the top will be open to the roof, which is already sealed off with a styrofoam ceiling.

    Does this sound like a bad thing to do? Will I be introducing any known problems or violating any codes?

    I'm in Michigan, and I don't want to heat the barn all the time, but only when I'm working there and/or maybe a couple days at a time when I'm finishing wood projects.

    TIA
    Gordy

  • #2
    Re: Insulating Pole Barn

    Here we go again. Check out this site, spray foam is really the best way to do it. Expensive yes, but it'll strengthen the structure and not allow any condensation to happen. If money is a factor, then I would suggest placing rigid foam against the metal, not away. The later part might be a debatable topic, however we already have had this conversation in the past. You can do a search for it, just type in poly, pole barns, key words.

    http://www.alltechinsulation.com/The...Structures.asp
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: Insulating Pole Barn

      Here we go again. Check out this site, spray foam is really the best way to do it. Expensive yes, but it'll strengthen the structure and not allow any condensation to happen. If money is a factor, then I would suggest placing rigid foam against the metal, not away. The later part might be a debatable topic, however we already have had this conversation in the past. You can do a search for it, just type in poly, pole barns, key words.

      OK, I did pole barns before I posted. Here are the 12 hits. Which one do you suggest? But thanks for the info.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Re: Insulating Pole Barn

        http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...sulation+steel

        this is the one I think he is refering to,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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        • #5
          Re: Insulating Pole Barn

          we do a lot of work in steel buildings and they put a fiberglass insulation that has a plastic type face on it . the fiberglass is touching the metal sides and roof . as long as the heat and moisture does not get to the metal then there will not be any condensation

          so you should seal up the siding at the floor out side and then use about a foot of pink stuff then use fiberglass with a vapor barrier then you can put plywood up4" on the inside

          thats what i would do my 2 cents
          Charlie

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          • #6
            Re: Insulating Pole Barn

            I think here in Montana we call these "Post and Pier" barns. We too are about to build one. Using the standard "wavy" pattern galvanized steel panels and 4x4's with 2x6's. However, we don't plan to insulate it. Even though the temps here in the winter can be very chilly indeed. Nope, instead, if we can't resist going to the garage to work on some project, then, we can fire up the black cast iron pot-belly stove. That will be our heat source in there.

            So thanks for posting this, I will check back for more tips from others on insulating such structures.
            Good Luck!
            PS. LOVE Great Stuff!
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            • #7
              Re: Insulating Pole Barn

              Originally posted by LuciKnows View Post
              I think here in Montana we call these "Post and Pier" barns. We too are about to build one. Using the standard "wavy" pattern galvanized steel panels and 4x4's with 2x6's. However, we don't plan to insulate it. Even though the temps here in the winter can be very chilly indeed. Nope, instead, if we can't resist going to the garage to work on some project, then, we can fire up the black cast iron pot-belly stove. That will be our heat source in there.

              So thanks for posting this, I will check back for more tips from others on insulating such structures.
              Good Luck!
              PS. LOVE Great Stuff!
              Insulate while you build it with the blanket type steel building insulation that comes in rolls and under the tin and over the purloins, it will never be easier or cheaper,

              about all you get with tin is a windbreak, very hard to heat, even with a wood stove and the heat is "free". the heat loss on tin is so great you will hardly warm the interior of that building, (yes you will have infrared heat off the wood stove but the air will not warm much)
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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