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  • Bedroom Built-In Questions

    Hello all,

    I have a question about some built-shelves we are looking to build in our bedroom at our little cabin up north.

    Currently, the wall you see pictured below has a 24 inch deep closet behind it that runs just about the whole length of the wall. We want to essentially re-construct it to be half closet and half built in shelves with doors. There will be an upper and lower compartment to the shelf space with 2 or 3 shelves in each compartment. The plan is to build a partition wall to separate the space in half.

    The framing part is pretty easy I think. It’s building the built-ins that I am not so sure about. The finished wall surface in the bedroom will be T&G pine. The inside of the built in will likely be cabinet grade plywood and the shelves made from the same material.


    I have a couple questions:
    1. When I install the back to front side panels and the top and bottom panels for inside the built-in onto the 2X4 frame, do I want the outer edge of those panels to stick out ¾ of an inch past the 2X4s to allow for the thickness of the T&G? Kind of like extension jambs on windows?
    2. My second question is what is the best way to hang doors on this? The edge of all the plywood panel sides will eventually be covered by trim around the entire outside perimeter of the built-in. Can I just mount hinges right into that trim and make the doors flush? I am just not sure the best way to do that. Any advice would be much appreciated. I am assuming face frames would not be a good application here?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Bedroom Built-In Questions

    I wrote a long reply that ended up somewhere in cyberspace. So as to not have to write another purposeless one, has any part of the project been built? Ie, the closet.

    Tom

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Bedroom Built-In Questions

      Originally posted by Tom W View Post
      I wrote a long reply that ended up somewhere in cyberspace. So as to not have to write another purposeless one, has any part of the project been built? Ie, the closet.

      Tom
      Hey Tom,

      Thank you replying. Sorry your first reply got lost.

      Nothing has been built yet. Right now the only thing on that wall is the closet. Basically that whole closet will get ripped off nd I'll start over with about half the wall being closet and half the wall being the built-in.....

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bedroom Built-In Questions

        Unless there is something I am missing your project is pretty straight forward. One thing to keep in mind when framing is, for aestetic reasons, the two outside stiles should be the same width and the midstile, between the closet and shelves, should be 1.6:1 of the outside stiles, or a mulitple of that, wide.

        Try to frame the shelves so that the distance from the edge of the door opening to the inside sides is the same on both sides. You may need to place a few shims, I generally use MDF, on the framing material on one side or the other to accomplish this but I think it looks more professional.

        When framing for the shelves make the shelf between the upper and lower portions permanent. Cut your lower 2x4s to length and fasten the shelf to it. Then fasten a 2x4 between the permanent shelf and the ceiling framing.

        I would have the T&G at the outside end stop at the 2x4 framing and make the face of the project continuous from one side to the other.

        Hanging your doors shouldn't be a problem. Leave the reveal the distance of the barrel of the hinges away from the opening. Here is a hint. Buy all your hardware and have it on hand before starting anything. Don't believe the other two hinges you need will be in next Tuesday.

        I generally iron on pre glued edge banding on the edges of plywood.

        If you plan to use shelf standards take the time to plow groves in the plywood on the insides of your cabinet sides and nail the standards in the grove. Don't just nail them on it will look as though you don't know how to do it right.

        There may be a hundred things I have forgotten and some of my explainations may be vague. If you have any questions, ask and I will attempt clarification.

        Tom
        Last edited by Tom W; 03-23-2009, 08:10 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bedroom Built-In Questions

          Originally posted by Tom W View Post
          Unless there is something I am missing your project is pretty straight forward. One thing to keep in mind when framing is, for aestetic reasons, the two outside stiles should be the same width and the midstile, between the closet and shelves, should be 1.6:1 of the outside stiles, or a mulitple of that, wide.

          Try to frame the shelves so that the distance from the edge of the door opening to the inside sides is the same on both sides. You may need to place a few shims, I generally use MDF, on the framing material on one side or the other to accomplish this but I think it looks more professional.

          When framing for the shelves make the shelf between the upper and lower portions permanent. Cut your lower 2x4s to length and fasten the shelf to it. Then fasten a 2x4 between the permanent shelf and the ceiling framing.

          I would have the T&G at the outside end stop at the 2x4 framing and make the face of the project continuous from one side to the other.

          Hanging your doors shouldn't be a problem. Leave the reveal the distance of the barrel of the hinges away from the opening. Here is a hint. Buy all your hardware and have it on hand before starting anything. Don't believe the other two hinges you need will be in next Tuesday.

          I generally iron on pre glued edge banding on the edges of plywood.

          If you plan to use shelf standards take the time to plow groves in the plywood on the insides of your cabinet sides and nail the standards in the grove. Don't just nail them on it will look as though you don't know how to do it right.

          There may be a hundred things I have forgotten and some of my explainations may be vague. If you have any questions, ask and I will attempt clarification.

          Tom
          Hi Tom,

          Thank you so much for taking the time to provide such a detailed response.

          I have jotted a few follow up questions below. I apologize for so many rookie type questions. I have never tried anything like this so it’s all pretty new….

          Originally posted by Tom W View Post
          Unless there is something I am missing your project is pretty straight forward. One thing to keep in mind when framing is, for aestetic reasons, the two outside stiles should be the same width and the midstile, between the closet and shelves, should be 1.6:1 of the outside stiles, or a mulitple of that, wide.
          Originally posted by Tom W View Post
          By “outside stiles” are you referring to the ones at the far right side of the shelf compartment and the other at the far left of the closet? The plan is for there to be about 12 to 15 inches of T&G between the closet and shelf so actually both the closet and shelf unit will have both left and right stiles. There really won’t be one midstile per se’.

          Try to frame the shelves so that the distance from the edge of the door opening to the inside sides is the same on both sides. You may need to place a few shims, I generally use MDF, on the framing material on one side or the other to accomplish this but I think it looks more professional.
          I apologize I just wasn’t able to follow on this one.

          When framing for the shelves make the shelf between the upper and lower portions permanent. Cut your lower 2x4s to length and fasten the shelf to it. Then fasten a 2x4 between the permanent shelf and the ceiling framing.
          I did some real basic built in bookshelves about a year ago and basically I fastened the inside side and rear “riser” panels to the frame and then placed my permanent middle shelf on the top edges of those panels and glued and brad nailed it in place. Would you advise against that?

          I would have the T&G at the outside end stop at the 2x4 framing and make the face of the project continuous from one side to the other.
          So the T&G will essentially cover the front edge of the vertical 2X4 shelf frame member and then the inside side panels of the shelf unit will come out flush with the outside surface of the T&G? Is that correct? I wanted to run casing around the whole thing. Would that look goofy?

          Hanging your doors shouldn't be a problem. Leave the reveal the distance of the barrel of the hinges away from the opening. Here is a hint. Buy all your hardware and have it on hand before starting anything. Don't believe the other two hinges you need will be in next Tuesday.
          I have never hung any door of any kind so this part will be fun….lol

          I generally iron on pre glued edge banding on the edges of plywood.
          Got it…..

          If you plan to use shelf standards take the time to plow groves in the plywood on the insides of your cabinet sides and nail the standards in the grove. Don't just nail them on it will look as though you don't know how to do it right.
          Got it…..


          There may be a hundred things I have forgotten and some of my explainations may be vague. If you have any questions, ask and I will attempt clarification.
          Got it…..


          Tom

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bedroom Built-In Questions

            Some of my explainations are a little ambiuous. Sorry.

            With the doors opened on your cabinets poke a ruler inside and measure the distance from the cabinet side to the edge of the door opening. Then do the same thing on the other side. I like to have the distances the same.

            The old guy who taught me to construct built-ins did it the way I wrote and I have always done it like that. But... I always thought it was a little silly. I am sure your way will work just as well, probably better. It certainly will be less work.

            As I interpret your drawing, the right end of the unit will be exposed. On the end of the shelving unit that will be exposed, bring the T&G to the edge of the verticle 2x4 on the front corner. Bring the inside cabinet side panel to the front of the same 2x4.

            Casing is essentially to cover the transition from sheetrock to wood. For wood to wood transitions I like to use small flat stock trim maybe 3/8 - 1/2" wide and about 3/16 thick. There is a name for it but I can't think what it is right now.

            There is nothing to hanging doors if the framing is square and the doors are square. For your first door experience you may wish to make overlay doors. They are far more forgiving than inset doors. If you handle frustration well and want to have some fun make the entire face of both the closet and shelving units from T&G then make inset doors and have all the verticle lines continuous from top to bottom.

            Tom
            Last edited by Tom W; 03-23-2009, 02:24 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bedroom Built-In Questions

              Hi Tom,

              This makes perfect sense now. Thank you again for taking the time to respond and provide such great detail. This will really help me out a lot.....

              Thank you.....

              Comment

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