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  • denshield and kerdi

    Considering options for a 4' by 4 ' shower stall that will be tiled. Basement location. Stud walls. One wall is exterior without vapour barrier (so far). We are planning a steam unit which would be used occasionally.

    In a steam shower, would Denshield be appropriate? What is the proper way to seal the seams and screw holes in Denshield?

    With Kerdi, how are seams sealed? I like this material since you can tile onto it, but how do you get the material to stay in the corners without fasteners?

    If using Denshield, vapour barrier should never be behind it i'm told. What about in a situation where it is an outside wall (cold Canadian climate)?

    Should a space be left between the cement sloped base and the bottom of the Denshield? I would be afraid of wicking if the Denshield came in contact with the cement base.

    I'll stop there. I would appreciate any advice you could give.

  • #2
    Re: denshield and kerdi

    A website is worth a thousand words. See Schluter-Kerdi here:

    http://www.schluter.com/8_4_kerdi_shower_kit.aspx

    We just installed this system in an existing shower that had been leaking into the dining room below. The kit comes with a sloped shower pan, drain, inside and outside corners, shower curb and waterproof membrane for the walls and floor. The system can be installed over drywall but we chose to use cement backerboard. There are numerous videos on the website that will take you through the installation process from start to finish. I was very impressed with the system and think it will become the norm in the not too distant future. The kit runs about $600 plus $50 or so for the dryset mortar to bed the floorpan and waterproof membrane. Once the system is installed you are ready for tile.

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    • #3
      Re: denshield and kerdi

      Thanks, I'm familiar with the system but wrote off using the whole system because our drain is not centered and i can't break open concrete to center it because we have underfloor hydronic heating that i don't want to disturb. So i can't use the base, but is the rest of the system usable without the base?

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      • #4
        Re: denshield and kerdi

        Hi riproy. We have a home with radiant in the floor. I have a raytek lazer temp gun. I ran the heat on. After it was up to temp. I found a solid 6 degree spike on each 3/8' copper tube.
        drilled in between! My gun was $300 years ago. You can get one for around $45 on Amazon
        To days tubes are pex. Our home was built in 1958 or so, 3/8" copper
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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        • #5
          Re: denshield and kerdi

          Originally posted by riproy View Post
          Thanks, I'm familiar with the system but wrote off using the whole system because our drain is not centered and i can't break open concrete to center it because we have underfloor hydronic heating that i don't want to disturb. So i can't use the base, but is the rest of the system usable without the base?
          If you buy a big enough floor pan you can cut it so the drain centerline lines up with your floor drain. We had to do the same thing as the existing drain didn't line up with the new floor pan. This mod is approved by the manufacturer.

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          • #6
            Re: denshield and kerdi

            Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
            Hi riproy. We have a home with radiant in the floor. I have a raytek lazer temp gun. I ran the heat on. After it was up to temp. I found a solid 6 degree spike on each 3/8' copper tube.
            drilled in between! My gun was $300 years ago. You can get one for around $45 on Amazon
            To days tubes are pex. Our home was built in 1958 or so, 3/8" copper
            I have had to go into a floor in a gym after it was poured complete with in floor heat to install some inserts that were not available when the floor was poured. I was told to wet the floor after it was turned on and the lines would become apparent, not so much. But I did find out (and I know this sound out there) wet your hand and feel the floor with the heat on. You will be able to pinpoint all the lines in the floor. I did and I have done it since. Although I own a heat gun now but in a pinch it really works.

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            • #7
              Re: denshield and kerdi

              Use Permabase or Durock (both cement board and GREAT products) not Densehield. I like the Permabase better however since it has small styrofoam bead mixed in with the concrete which make the product lighter and slightly more flexible. Cement board basically lasts forever

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              • #8
                Re: denshield and kerdi

                I've decided to go with a product called 'wedi'. Check it out online. It is expensive, but for a steam shower it seems the way to go.

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                • #9
                  Re: denshield and kerdi

                  Originally posted by riproy View Post
                  I've decided to go with a product called 'wedi'. Check it out online. It is expensive, but for a steam shower it seems the way to go.
                  It's a very interesting system. Do you know through whom it is distributed? I see an Atlanta contact number but no list of distributors. Any idea on prices? Schluter-Kerdi runs about $650 for enough material for a 4' X 4' shower and includes the drain. This system would be a big labor savings over the Kerdi system so if you were selling to a customer, and paid $1000 or so for the material, it would be comparable.

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                  • #10
                    Re: denshield and kerdi

                    Originally posted by killavolt View Post
                    It's a very interesting system. Do you know through whom it is distributed? I see an Atlanta contact number but no list of distributors. Any idea on prices? Schluter-Kerdi runs about $650 for enough material for a 4' X 4' shower and includes the drain. This system would be a big labor savings over the Kerdi system so if you were selling to a customer, and paid $1000 or so for the material, it would be comparable.
                    That seems to be the sticky part - its hard to get a hold of. There is a list of tech sales reps on the site that you can call or email to find out. The shower i am working on is an odd shape so i don't know what a standard 4 x 4 would be, and it will likely be cheaper for US customers than for us up north. I like that it is the structural backer board and vapour barrier all in one, and it looks like a breeze to work with.
                    Last edited by riproy; 04-07-2009, 07:23 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: denshield and kerdi

                      I got a price on the Wedi system. $750 vs. $600 for Kerdi. About 3 hours to install the Wedi system if you've never done one before and about a day and a half for the Kerdi system. Kerdi does not include tile backer, mesh tape, fasteners or dry set mortar so the price is a wash but a big savings in labor costs.

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