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  • Drwall Repair (water damage)

    It's been a while since I logged on here - hope someone like garager can help me with a question.

    One of my bathrooms used to have a shower curtain and the water had been spraying out and hitting the drywall. I did not realize anything was up until the paint started lifting off. Also there is some mold growth on the surface - not much but hopefully not gone too deep. The problem was solved by replacing the curtain with a shower door but I never got around to fixing the drywall.

    I was planning to cut out the damaged section of drywall and replace but I was wondering if it would make more sense to use cement board instead. I do not know much about cement board and I understand it is used in places like shower enclosures.

    In the long term I plan to retile the shower with stone tiles and also extend the tile to cover this area so that was also the reason I was thinking of this as a possible way. Or should I stick to regular drywall.

  • #2
    Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

    As a patch repair before the tearout for tile I would just cut out the mold back to a stud and replace it with the mold resistant green drywall. When you tear out to do the tile do it right with cement board and kerdi system or similar. Use the green board in the rest of the bathroom that is not exposed to the shower water.

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    • #3
      Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

      I'm not a fan of green rock, I haven't been for many years. But for a temp fix, you can go either type of rock. When you do go to remodel your bathroom, I like Hardybacker board and Durarock for tiling. Be sure to kill the mold that's growing inside your wall, usually it's growing on each side of the rock. I've had past experience with mold in my lungs and it'll mess you up, so try not to breath any of it inside of you. If its growing on any insulation, replace it. When you do your remodel, chime in if you need any help.
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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      • #4
        Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

        I'm with Garager and his fix(except for the mold experience :-)

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        • #5
          Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

          Thanks for the replies guys. I will watch out for the mold - I will wear a respirator to hopefully guard against that. Hopefully the effect was not long term or serious for garager. I did buy some stuff online to kill the mold - cannot remember what it was exactly - I need to find it - it is in my garage somewhere. All this happened quite a while ago and everything dried out but I did not get around to the repair until now.

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          • #6
            Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

            Okay so I'm in the process of doing this. It turns out the damage was somewhat superficial and there is no mold any deeper than at the top layer. However the paper on top of the drywall had peeled so I cut out the damaged section and replaced with new drywall. Just waiting for the joint compound to dry after the third coat.

            I wanted ask if there is any coating that can be applied so that even if water splashed on the wall in the future no damage would occur. I see this repair as only temporary anyway as I'm planning to remodel the shower with stone slab and possobly cover this part with some stone tiles. Unfortunately I was rushed into fixing this by the guy doing property valuation for the purpose of refinancing the mortgage - right now the mortgage companies are being picky about every small detail and the guy has to come back and inspect the repair after it is done.

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            • #7
              Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

              Oil Paint..... and primer
              Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

              http://www.contractorspub.com

              A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

                I'm just finishing up a major bathroom remodel where the tile wasn't done correctly by the previous owner and there had been water getting behind the tile, probably for years. You're lucky your damage was minimal - I had a huge problem and basically had to rebuild everything in the room including the stud walls and the subfloor. Here's my feelings:

                1. I wouldn't bother with cement backer for your current repair, since it's just temporary. It is just going to be more work to finish that section flush to the remainder of the wal and to no real advantage. Backerboard is the right material for a tile substrate, but it's not the cure for moisture or mold. If you take care of the mold problem (remove and replace) and clear up the miosture source you should be fine. I would use greenboard in preference to normal drywall because the area is close to the shower and therefore going to see high humidity. Greenboard is worthless if exposed to serious moisture, and has no place whatsoever in showers or tub surrounds, but the paper and gypsum in the green stuff is a little more resistant than regular white drywall and won't dissolve to mush quite as easily. In a proper installation, water should never be getting to the sheetrock or greenboard. For either, if it is, you will have a problem. Use your favorite tile backer (I like hardibacker) and Schluter Kerdi when time comes to do the new remodel. Don't skip the kerdi. Tile backer is NOT, repeat NOT, a miosture barrier. BAsed on my own experience, the old way, using 15 pound roofer's felt behind the tile backer or mud floated walls, isn't good enough of a moisture barrier. I would use Kerdi.

                2. I did a lot of research and learned that the best way to deal with mold is cut out anything that has any hint of infection and get rid of it, which it sounds like you did. But, I would replace at least one stud's distance of material beyond the visible signs of mold. You should do your own research, but as garager mentions, mold can be a serious health problem. "Killing" the mold isn't sufficient, and is basically impossible since mold, like bacteria, is present all around us anyway. You need to remove, living or dead, the actual mold, as even the residual from dead mold can cause severe allergic & toxic problems. THen, it's critical to keep the materials dry since mold spores only grow in favorable conditions (basically, that means moist).

                3. There is a company called Foster Products that makes materials you might be interested in. Check out Foster 40-80 disinfectant and Foster 40-25 "full defense" coating. I called this company and was told that the 40-25 coating will even kill reisdual mold spores left after a mold cleanup.

                But... the best defense is to keep water off of building materials. Things in a bathroom are bound to ge wet, but if you dry them off rather than let them soak, you will likely not have problems.

                Good Luck!

                -Andy
                Last edited by Andy_M; 05-13-2009, 03:01 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Drwall Repair (water damage)

                  Thanks for the replies garager and Andy. I will look into the Foster coatings mentioned - I'm not clear from their website if this can be used as a coating against water (at least some form of splash resistance).

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