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Replacing decking

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  • Replacing decking

    I've got some decking to replace. It is random boards about 6 or 7 in all. The deck is about 16 years old and these boards take a beating from the sun and weather all day long, not shaded by the house during the day.

    Anyway, they are PT 2x6s screwed down at each joist with three 3" Phillips head screws. The screw heads are filled in with stain from years of re-coating the deck so tough to get a good bite on the screw w/o cleaning out each screw head. Using my drill with a new (sharp) #2 bit I have been only able to remove about a quarter of the screws. The rest will either shear off when I try to back them out or I can't get a bite on them and end up rounding out the screw head.

    So my solution I think will be to shear off all those that I can't remove and remove those that I can. The balance I will just have to pry the board up doing as little damage to adjacent boards and the framing. To get at the boards to pry them up I plan to drill a 1/2" hole through the face in the middle and use a jig saw to cut toward each side. I plan on the jigsaw because it makes a controlled vertical cut as opposed to a recrip saw or a circ saw and there will be less chance of damage to adjacent boards. After cutting a piece out between two joists and knocking it out I can then get in to pry the remainder of the deck board up. Once removed cut the sheared off screws flush and go on from there.

    Anyone got a better/easier/faster way to do this? I don't have that many to replace but they are all 12 to 18 footers and laid down in a diagonal pattern.
    ---------------
    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
    ---------------
    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
    ---------
    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
    ---------
    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

  • #2
    Re: Replacing decking

    How about trying a screw extractor? Sears sells them so does Lowe's and probably Home Depot. You'll get the ones you rounded off and most of the others. It will bite through the stain build-up. The ones that shear off you'll deal with as described above. the more you can remove the easier it will be to pry up the deck boards.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Replacing decking

      you can try an easyout type of screw extractor or use a hammer and chisle to split the old decking where the screws that wont come out are and just whack the screw with a hammer sidways to break it off

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Replacing decking

        Once I get two boards up, I use my reciprocating saw between the joist and board and cut the screw flush with the joist.

        6", 14tpi blade hooah!
        Anyone can tear a man down, few can build one up.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Replacing decking

          Originally posted by Tyman View Post
          Once I get two boards up, I use my reciprocating saw between the joist and board and cut the screw flush with the joist.

          6", 14tpi blade hooah!

          Too much work. old decking splits very easily with a chisel

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Replacing decking

            Originally posted by Arthur96 View Post
            Too much work. old decking splits very easily with a chisel
            Agree.........
            Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

            http://www.contractorspub.com

            A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Replacing decking

              Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
              So my solution I think will be to shear off all those that I can't remove and remove those that I can. The balance I will just have to pry the board up doing as little damage to adjacent boards and the framing. To get at the boards to pry them up I plan to drill a 1/2" hole through the face in the middle and use a jig saw to cut toward each side. I plan on the jigsaw because it makes a controlled vertical cut as opposed to a recrip saw or a circ saw and there will be less chance of damage to adjacent boards. After cutting a piece out between two joists and knocking it out I can then get in to pry the remainder of the deck board up. Once removed cut the sheared off screws flush and go on from there.

              Anyone got a better/easier/faster way to do this? I don't have that many to replace but they are all 12 to 18 footers and laid down in a diagonal pattern.
              I've think you're already onto the best approach Bob...

              I would also second Tyman's idea...

              Originally posted by Tyman View Post
              Once I get two boards up, I use my reciprocating saw between the joist and board and cut the screw flush with the joist.

              6", 14tpi blade hooah!
              I've repaired ton's of decks (and fencing too ) and that's the method I use.... All you need is a flat bar (wonder bar) or chisel to give enough of a crack between the joist and the deck board to start the metal cutting sawzall blade. Cuts the nails or screws quickly and neatly. I use a jigsaw as you suggested when there's no room to start my reciprocating blade but once I have room I switch to the sawzall as it's usually faster. If you're worried about damage to the other planks just stop an 1/8' or so from the edge and give it a good whack with your hammer...


              Originally posted by Arthur96 View Post
              Too much work. old decking splits very easily with a chisel
              Old decking does usually split quite easily but then you've still got the screws or nails to deal with...

              Tapping the chisel once between the joist and the deck board with a chisel or flat bar then quickly cutting through the fasteners really isn't any more work than your method imho

              Whatever method you choose, good luck with your project Bob
              Cheers! - Jim
              -------------
              All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Replacing decking

                Originally posted by Arthur96 View Post
                Too much work. old decking splits very easily with a chisel
                I agree with a brute attack and not finese. Snap off whatever won't unscrew, maybe use a 1/2Inch bit and drill some of the stripped heads off. Then, put a piece of scrap wood on the adjacent good deck board and use a pry bar,crow bar to lift the bad boards. Once the boards are off, hammer down any exposed screws. This next suggestion might not be of use for deck boards but On exposed screw heads such as those on my pool and skimmer where the screw heads are under water, a small dab of silicone will keep the head like new for years! Simple to pluck the silicone off when you want to remove the screw.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Replacing decking

                  Thanks everyone for the replies. But it's now getting dark here so I am done for the night and have already taken up all the damaged boards. I only had 7 so wasn't bad. But only two were side by side, the rest were scattered about.

                  The screws that would not back out I just used the drill in low and either sheared them off backing out or trying to drive them in. Once I had the board up I just used a pair of pliers and broke them off near the top of the joist, them used a hand sledge to drive them flush with the top of the joist. Then used a scraper to clean out the crevices and cut my new decking to length. Only problem I am short three boards so will have to pick up 3 18 footers tomorrow or over the weekend. It's gonna be nice the next couple days so want to get this stuff down so I can stain it soon. Got a party planned for about 40 people this summer and working on sprucing up the deck. The deck is about 24 x 40 should we should have enough room, and its built to handle the load so no worries there.
                  ---------------
                  Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                  ---------------
                  “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                  ---------
                  "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                  ---------
                  sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Replacing decking

                    Originally posted by Tyman View Post
                    Once I get two boards up, I use my reciprocating saw between the joist and board and cut the screw flush with the joist.

                    6", 14tpi blade hooah!
                    I used that trick in a couple spots, TNX
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                    ---------
                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                    ---------
                    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Replacing decking

                      Originally posted by jbergstrom View Post

                      Old decking does usually split quite easily but then you've still got the screws or nails to deal with...

                      Tapping the chisel once between the joist and the deck board with a chisel or flat bar then quickly cutting through the fasteners really isn't any more work than your method imho

                      Whatever method you choose, good luck with your project Bob

                      Sure it is. First you gota go get your Sawzall or whatever then pry and hold up the board somehow while you cut the screws. Make sure you dont bind or cut into the joist somehow balance the board when you get far along....etc.

                      My way no sawzall. you split and pull after the board is out you whack the screws with the hammer from the "side" and you know as well as i that screws just Snap off this way at the joist. Simple and to the point

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Replacing decking

                        Originally posted by Arthur96 View Post
                        Sure it is. First you gota go get your Sawzall or whatever then pry and hold up the board somehow while you cut the screws. Make sure you dont bind or cut into the joist somehow balance the board when you get far along....etc.

                        My way no sawzall. you split and pull after the board is out you whack the screws with the hammer from the "side" and you know as well as i that screws just Snap off this way at the joist. Simple and to the point
                        With all due respect I never said your method wouldn't work....

                        I simply replied to the fact that you said Tyman's method was "too much work"....

                        Not at all... and since like I previously mentioned my sawzall would already be present there is no time lost there...

                        You don't have to pry or hold the board up at all, simply place your flatbar or chisel at the junction and give one simple tap to cause a slight gap...

                        Maybe I'm assuming everybody can handle a sawzall the way Tyman or myself suggests

                        It doesn't take much to slide the tip of a metal cutting blade in and start the cut... start to finish, mere seconds...

                        The deck board and the top of the joist guide the cut...

                        Anyways the main reason I do it this way is to prevent damage to the top of the joist...

                        I respectfully disagree with what Frank says here ->

                        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                        I agree with a brute attack and not finese. Snap off whatever won't unscrew, maybe use a 1/2Inch bit and drill some of the stripped heads off. Then, put a piece of scrap wood on the adjacent good deck board and use a pry bar,crow bar to lift the bad boards.....
                        This method risks splitting the top of the already weathered joists (damhikt)

                        Hitting the screws on the side to snap them will usually work but I've also seen the side of the joist pop off if the screw is too close to the edge...

                        I'm just explaining "my" methods and why that's all

                        Good luck with the repair and hope the weather is good for your party Bob
                        Cheers! - Jim
                        -------------
                        All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Replacing decking

                          Originally posted by jbergstrom View Post
                          With all due respect I never said your method wouldn't work....

                          I simply replied to the fact that you said Tyman's method was "too much work"....

                          Not at all... and since like I previously mentioned my sawzall would already be present there is no time lost there...

                          You don't have to pry or hold the board up at all, simply place your flatbar or chisel at the junction and give one simple tap to cause a slight gap...

                          Maybe I'm assuming everybody can handle a sawzall the way Tyman or myself suggests

                          It doesn't take much to slide the tip of a metal cutting blade in and start the cut... start to finish, mere seconds...

                          The deck board and the top of the joist guide the cut...

                          Anyways the main reason I do it this way is to prevent damage to the top of the joist...

                          I respectfully disagree with what Frank says here ->



                          This method risks splitting the top of the already weathered joists (damhikt)

                          Hitting the screws on the side to snap them will usually work but I've also seen the side of the joist pop off if the screw is too close to the edge...

                          I'm just explaining "my" methods and why that's all

                          Good luck with the repair and hope the weather is good for your party Bob
                          I respect the suggestions of professionals and although I had some thoughts on this problem, if I had to do this job I would first go with the Pro!
                          I appreciate your patience and clear explanation, thanks.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Replacing decking

                            well i wasn't trying to cause a ruckus LOL either way is fine whatever works for you. Its just that doing this stuff for a living all my life, the time saved to just split the old out is worth it to me. Personally i wouldn't even have a Sawzall out to replace a few deck boards but thats just me. Go figure.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Replacing decking

                              Everybody got their way of doing it, doesn't mean the others are all wrong. Some methods work better in some situations than others. And that is why I asked, I wanted to hear a number of people experiences and suggestions because I knew that with the boards I had to remove the same solution would not necessarily work for each one. Only a couple of the boards that I had to replace were side-by-side. And this deck had the boards laid tight together, no gaps, so there is little if any room to split them out to. They all range from just under 14' to 18' long, and some pass under 4x4 legs of benches and others are notched to go around the legs. That's because some legs pass through and are bolted to the framing and some do not.
                              Click image for larger version

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                              It's a sturdy deck, 12" concrete piers laid in a 6'x8' grid, with doubled 2x12s laid from pier to pier, and filled in with 2x12s 16"OC and joist hangers used on all connections. The deck is all 2x6 and all wood is treated.

                              To remove screws that could not be backed out. I eased the area beside the screw head using a 3/8" bit and drilled down beside the head till I almost broke through the bottom of the deck board. I didn't want to hit the joist so I used a drill stop set at 1-3/8". Then when prying the boards up the hole alongside the screw head allowed it to slip right out, so very little resistance and made the job easier. To deal with any remaining screws I used a pair of pliers to break the screw off as close to the top of the joist as I could. I bent back and forth only one or two times before they broke, and I bent them in the direction the joist ran so as not to break out the side of the joist. This worked much better than beating on them with a hammer and as just as fast. then I used a hammer to drive what remained of the screw flush with the top of the joist, then cleaned all the sawdust, paint, and other crud off so the new boards will lay flat.

                              When prying up a board and using a adjacent remaining deck board to support my lever (7 ft long 2x4), I used either a 36" piece of the old 2x6 decking or a roughly 2 foot piece of 1-1/2" angle which I used to cover the edge of the deck board I was prying against. This kept the lever from crushing the edge of deck boards that I wished to keep.
                              ---------------
                              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                              ---------------
                              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                              ---------
                              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                              ---------
                              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                              Comment

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