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  • ballpeen hammer question

    hi guys, it been a while eh?

    the summer season and more work have kept me outside.

    anyways, i use the ball on a ballpeen hammer to make homemade rivets for my art.

    can anybody tell me what the original reason was for the ball?

    thanks, Vince

  • #2
    Re: ballpeen hammer question

    It think it was to peen rivets,

    before welding and modern adhesives, rivets were used to hold many things together, and are still used on many things, explicitly in Agriculture knife sections on sickles

    many disks are riveted to the hubs of many tillage tools,

    at one time sheet metal was riveted to the frames, rivets were used on harnesses and rivets were used on canvas of threshers and other header type implements,
    Last edited by BHD; 10-07-2009, 09:04 PM.
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    • #3
      Re: ballpeen hammer question

      I agree with BHD

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      • #4
        Re: ballpeen hammer question

        I also agree, peening the shank of a rivet.

        I use to run sickle bar type mowing machines for cutting hay and would hand rivet sections on in the field. Also needed a sharp chisel to knock the heads off and a punch for driving them out. Hardest part was finding a place to lay it on for the work to be done. Now they have nuts and bolts for this. I did have a rivet punch and press for repairs, looked like a flattened out X with the punch on one end and the press on the other.

        G3

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        • #5
          Re: ballpeen hammer question

          i use the ballpeen hammer more than any other hammer i own.

          great for tight spaces and for knocking copper fittings back to round.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            Re: ballpeen hammer question

            I use a ball peen hammer for making gaskets.
            Buy cheap, buy twice.

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            • #7
              Re: ballpeen hammer question

              Vince:

              "A ball-peen (or ball-pein; also known in Europe and North America as ball pane[1]) hammer is a type of peening hammer used in metalworking. It is distinguished from a point-peen hammer or chisel-peen hammer by having a hemispherical head. Though the process of peening has become rarer in metal fabrication, the ball-peen hammer remains useful for many tasks such as tapping punches and chisels.

              Ball-peen hammers are divided into two classes: hard-faced and soft-faced. The head of a hard-faced hammer is made of heat treated forged high-carbon steel[2] or alloy steel;[3] it is harder than the face of a claw hammer.[4] The soft-faced hammers are made from brass, lead, tightly wound rawhide, or plastic. These hammers usually have replaceable heads or faces, because they will deform, wear out, or break over time. They are used when there is the danger of damaging a striking surface.[5]

              The original function of the hammer was to "peen" riveted or welded material but today, the ball end of the hammer is most commonly used to expand and shape the free end of copper roves, light rivets and similarly, "setting" the rivet in place to complete the joint. Peening is also the method by which steel drums are formed and tuned.

              A ball-peen hammer is also known as an engineer's hammer or a machinist's hammer and may be graded by the weight of the head. It is the mechanic's hammer of choice when making gaskets or driving drift pins."


              Vince, there is also a cross-peen hammer which has a straight-line, almost dull chisel on the other end of the hammer where the round peen would be. It is used to flatten out and peen rivets and such also.
              Don't see too many cross peens around, but I use mine for metal working.
              One mistake that many of us (including myself) do is to use a regular carpenter's hammer to drive pins, punches, chisels and such. The face of a carpenter's hammer is not made for that and can shatter. One is supposed to use either a ball-peen or cross peen hammer to drive punches and chisels because the face of the peen hammers is made to hit other metal striking tools and will not come undone. With the ball peen hammers, you also have many different weights to choose from to drive everything from the largest to the smallest without wearing your arm out.
              Cheers,
              Jim Don

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              • #8
                Re: ballpeen hammer question

                Originally posted by G3sprinklers View Post
                I also agree, peening the shank of a rivet.

                I use to run sickle bar type mowing machines for cutting hay and would hand rivet sections on in the field. Also needed a sharp chisel to knock the heads off and a punch for driving them out. Hardest part was finding a place to lay it on for the work to be done. Now they have nuts and bolts for this. I did have a rivet punch and press for repairs, looked like a flattened out X with the punch on one end and the press on the other.

                G3
                God, that took me back many years. Back in 1971 I ran a combine here in Oregon cutting grass seed. It was a real wet year and the cutters would gum up real bad. We tried many things and I was the go to guy to replace all the cutters. Ball peen, a sharp chisel and a punch along with a chunk of steel was all I used. In fact, a sharp chisel was faster than a grinder.

                Charles
                Charles

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                • #9
                  Re: ballpeen hammer question

                  I finally got a short piece of rail road track to beat on and a couple sticks of fire wood to support each end of the bar.

                  G3

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                  • #10
                    Re: ballpeen hammer question

                    Some of "older", I am now 60, people are really lucky to some extent. I had the fortune, and pleasure now that I can look back, to have learned sheet metal working from a real experts. I was hired my senior year of high school for a second shift job at a local textile mill/factory. The maintenance shop made almost everything needed to keep this place running back then. Earl and David (not me) had years of experience behind them when this skinny (then) little kid met them and wanted to learn all I could. Those guys taught me a lot about making all sorts of things from sheet metal, which included black iron, galvanized, copper, lead sheets, and the newer stainless steel. Ball pein, cross pein, and pin head (?) hammers were tool of the trade. How many thousands of rivets did I set for them back then with a ball pein hammer, and rivet setting tool. I have often thanked these guys, who have passed away now, for what they taught me as I work on my older cars and have to make some small sheet metal parts. Thanks, David

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