Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Garage Door Insulation Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Garage Door Insulation

    How can I determine if my garage door is insulated?

    The labels on the door do not indicate insulation or not. The house was built in 2003 by a fairly reputable builder. The door is thick enough that insulation could be sandwhiched between the two panels. The 3 car garage is attached to the house, the door faces south, and there is living space above the garage. During the summer (North Carolina) the temperatue in the garage can reach 90 degrees.

    Is 90 degrees reasonable?
    Should I drill a small hole in the interior of the door to look for insulation?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Garage Door Insulation

    Is it a metal door? wood door? masonite covered door? If it is metal, MOST metal doors that are not insulated do not have a covering on the inside. If it is masonite covered (smooth on each side) it probably is not insulated, Likewise if it is a raised panel wood door.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Garage Door Insulation

      Originally posted by Pipestone Kid View Post
      Is it a metal door? wood door? masonite covered door? If it is metal, MOST metal doors that are not insulated do not have a covering on the inside. If it is masonite covered (smooth on each side) it probably is not insulated, Likewise if it is a raised panel wood door.
      I know it's not wood or masonite. So I assume it's metal. Just trying to determine if it's hollow inside or if there is insulation. Guess I could drill an inspection hole.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Garage Door Insulation

        If there is an inner panel, the only way I know to determine is to gain access to the in between space (i.e. inspection hole, unless you can remove or pry back the inner panel on an edge).

        Insulating it (or applying more insulation) is a double-edged sword for a south-facing door. I live north of you in Goldsboro, where the piedmont, sand hills, and coastal plain intersect. I have a 2 car garage with a metal non-insulated door that faces directly south. In the winter, I gain about 10 degrees inside temp over outside just from the sun hitting the door (even though it is painted white). In the summer, the eaves keep the sun from hitting the door, and the white color reflects enough heat that it reduces the temp by about 5 degrees. When the heat was over 100 degrees two summers ago, it was about 95 in my garage.

        However, with a living space above the garage, you are probably more concerned with heat build-up. Several things may come into play to try to get the heat down:

        1. If there are windows in the garage door, put heat reflective film on them.
        2. Adding additional insulation, as well as making sure the exterior of the door is a light color will also minimize heat coming from that area.
        3. Remove any heat producing devices from the garage (i.e. freezer, refrigerator, etc)
        4. Garage walls not adjoining living spaces are usually poorly insulated. Removing the interior sheet rock and applying better insulation in the walls may help (especially if the exterior walls are just OSB and vinyl siding). Pumped in insulation may also work, but I defer to the construction experts on that topic. I have brick walls so the heat transfer is much slower and not as intense.
        Alternate #4: Add insulation over the existing interior wall.

        Before doing any wall insulating, though, I would try to determine where the heat is coming from by feeling the walls when exposed to direct sun and when they are shaded. (taping a thermometer to the inside wall would be more accurate.) If there is a distinct difference, than insulation will make a big difference for both summer and winter.

        JMTCW

        Go

        P.S, To determine if the door panel is metal, stick a magnet on it.
        Practicing at practical wood working

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Garage Door Insulation

          Originally posted by Gofor View Post
          If there is an inner panel, the only way I know to determine is to gain access to the in between space (i.e. inspection hole, unless you can remove or pry back the inner panel on an edge).

          Insulating it (or applying more insulation) is a double-edged sword for a south-facing door. I live north of you in Goldsboro, where the piedmont, sand hills, and coastal plain intersect. I have a 2 car garage with a metal non-insulated door that faces directly south. In the winter, I gain about 10 degrees inside temp over outside just from the sun hitting the door (even though it is painted white). In the summer, the eaves keep the sun from hitting the door, and the white color reflects enough heat that it reduces the temp by about 5 degrees. When the heat was over 100 degrees two summers ago, it was about 95 in my garage.

          However, with a living space above the garage, you are probably more concerned with heat build-up. Several things may come into play to try to get the heat down:

          1. If there are windows in the garage door, put heat reflective film on them.
          2. Adding additional insulation, as well as making sure the exterior of the door is a light color will also minimize heat coming from that area.
          3. Remove any heat producing devices from the garage (i.e. freezer, refrigerator, etc)
          4. Garage walls not adjoining living spaces are usually poorly insulated. Removing the interior sheet rock and applying better insulation in the walls may help (especially if the exterior walls are just OSB and vinyl siding). Pumped in insulation may also work, but I defer to the construction experts on that topic. I have brick walls so the heat transfer is much slower and not as intense.
          Alternate #4: Add insulation over the existing interior wall.

          Before doing any wall insulating, though, I would try to determine where the heat is coming from by feeling the walls when exposed to direct sun and when they are shaded. (taping a thermometer to the inside wall would be more accurate.) If there is a distinct difference, than insulation will make a big difference for both summer and winter.

          JMTCW

          Go

          P.S, To determine if the door panel is metal, stick a magnet on it.
          Thanks for all of the great information! I'll do the magnet and an inspection hole. The garage is completely sheetrocked so I can't determine how well the garage is insulated. At this point I'm just trying to keep the garage cooler in the warmer weather.

          Thanks again

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Garage Door Insulation

            some times one can take off a receptacle or switch cover and see if the walls are insulated or what there insulated with, by a crack between the dry wall and the electrical box,
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment

            Working...
            X