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Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

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  • Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

    I've got to repair my fascia boards due to rot and squirrel damage. Should I replace the entire fascia board, or just cut out the rotted portions and put in new lengths of board? If cutting out the rot is appropriate, how do I cut a scarf joint in the existing board without removing it from the house?

    Thanks
    Spakman

  • #2
    Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

    Hard to answer without seeing your situation.

    Personally I wouldn't waste a lot of time analyzing how to cut the joint... I wouldn't do an unsupported scarf joint anyway. I would just change the entire board and be done with it rather than waste hours on a questionable in-situ cut.

    If you really don't want to change the whole fascia board, you could also place a square joint over a rafter tail (assuming it's that type of construction), as long as the tail's not rotted. Screw it in solid with stainless screws or coated deck screws, fill and feather the joint with bondo (yup the auto body stuff), then prime and paint and no one will be the wiser. Or you could skip the bondo if it ends up matching pretty well. After all it's only a fascia board.

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    • #3
      Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

      +1

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      • #4
        Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

        When you replace them, prime all 4 sides to avoid future problems

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        • #5
          Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

          if the roof does not have a drip edge flashing, one may want add it,
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          • #6
            Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

            Good suggestion above.

            Another option though I have not used the material myself might be PVC.
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            • #7
              Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

              Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
              Good suggestion above.

              Another option though I have not used the material myself might be PVC.
              I replaced all of my facia boards last fall. Primed and painted all 4 sides before puting them on then touched up a little. Had the local gutter guy come put new gutters and downspouts on. The best renovation with just a few bucks I've done in a long time.

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              • #8
                Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

                The best option is to replace the entire fascia board. As stated above "prime all 4 sides", I use a sealing primer rather than just a std. primer. A sealing primer seals the wood and helps reduce its expansion and contraction during changes in the weather (humid -v- dry). I go one step farther and back-paint the boards prior to installing them.

                Also I only use hot-dipped galvanized nails. Non-coated nails will rust inside the wood and cause the wood to begin to rot from within, remember, there is moisture within the wood. I sink all the nail heads and use glazer's compound to fill the holes prior to painting.

                Why glazer's compound? It doesn't shrink in the holes, stays flexible and takes paint very well. Works much better than wood putty (filler) or caulk. And filling the holes keep water from wicking into the wood and causing rot.
                Dimensional Carpentry & Custom Woodworking
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                • #9
                  Re: Repairing/Replacing Fascia boards

                  Good tip on the glazing compound. Thank you

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                  Practicing at practical wood working

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