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  • New OSHA "lead" mandates...

    Have you guys heard about this? A couple of the contractors I do work for are really worked up about them. I guess they take effect April of this year. From what I have heard about these new mandates, its going to really cut into who can and cant afford to do any remodeling. Anything involving over six square feet of re-work must have a lead specialist evaluate the scope of the job and jobsite for any lead contaminates, and if found over a certain level full tyvek type suits for all workers with respirators and an air exchange system.... Please tell me this is a full on joke and not really true...... If so, do these people have any idea how much a lead specialist cost to do a jobsite eval? Its in the thousands of dollars.... Good bye small bathroom remodels...

    Do these idiots ever think that we construction people are not complete idiots and we actually can take care of ourselves and that we assume the risk that our job brings? I dont need some bureaucrat looking over my shoulder to make sure I take care of my health, I can do that on my own, and I can handle the hazards my job brings.....

  • #2
    Re: New OSHA "lead" mandates...

    I'm not sure if they are as concerned about the contractor as they are the family that has to live in the home once the job is done.

    http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/traincert.htm

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New OSHA "lead" mandates...

      Originally posted by Alphacowboy View Post
      Have you guys heard about this? A couple of the contractors I do work for are really worked up about them. I guess they take effect April of this year. From what I have heard about these new mandates, its going to really cut into who can and cant afford to do any remodeling. Anything involving over six square feet of re-work must have a lead specialist evaluate the scope of the job and jobsite for any lead contaminates, and if found over a certain level full tyvek type suits for all workers with respirators and an air exchange system.... Please tell me this is a full on joke and not really true...... If so, do these people have any idea how much a lead specialist cost to do a jobsite eval? Its in the thousands of dollars.... Good bye small bathroom remodels...

      Do these idiots ever think that we construction people are not complete idiots and we actually can take care of ourselves and that we assume the risk that our job brings? I dont need some bureaucrat looking over my shoulder to make sure I take care of my health, I can do that on my own, and I can handle the hazards my job brings.....
      They do believe we are complete idiots due to the sheet list of exposure victims brought forth from various insurance companies. The worst part is? THEY ARE RIGHT! That's why I always wear a dustmask at work, and I always get ragged on for it. Lead and asbestos are especially common in older homes, and here is why: It was a common practice for workers to dump a handful of asbestos into the motar mix to apply a smooth finish coat on those plaster walls. Over time, someone else decides to paint that very same wall, which contains a large amount of lead in it for a durable coat that will last for years. So guess what happens during a remodel? You got it! We now have not only lead dust in the air, but a nice helping of asbestos fibers flying around to latch onto the insides of our lungs!

      The next time you go into a remodel job with crap lingering in the air everywhere, count the number of people who actually wear the proper dustmask / respirator for the job. And I DON'T mean the cheap 50 cent POS, I'm talking the $1.25 a piece N-95s, something that affords at least SOME protection. I garantee you will still have fingers left over on one hand.


      Edit:

      It does NOT cost thousands of dollars for a lead inspection. A few hundred at best, in which case, why in God's name do contractors act like it is their money that is being spent for one? It is the customer that ends up paying for it, not us! Hell, in the end, it is the customer that gets an education over his or her HOME that is contaminated with lead and/or asbestos! All us the workers have to do is put it in the contract and explain to the customer that it is the law!

      Sheesh! Why do construction workers even complain about such things?
      Last edited by tailgunner; 02-19-2010, 10:52 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New OSHA "lead" mandates...

        Originally posted by tailgunner View Post
        They do believe we are complete idiots due to the sheet list of exposure victims brought forth from various insurance companies. The worst part is? THEY ARE RIGHT! That's why I always wear a dustmask at work, and I always get ragged on for it. Lead and asbestos are especially common in older homes, and here is why: It was a common practice for workers to dump a handful of asbestos into the motar mix to apply a smooth finish coat on those plaster walls. Over time, someone else decides to paint that very same wall, which contains a large amount of lead in it for a durable coat that will last for years. So guess what happens during a remodel? You got it! We now have not only lead dust in the air, but a nice helping of asbestos fibers flying around to latch onto the insides of our lungs!

        The next time you go into a remodel job with crap lingering in the air everywhere, count the number of people who actually wear the proper dustmask / respirator for the job. And I DON'T mean the cheap 50 cent POS, I'm talking the $1.25 a piece N-95s, something that affords at least SOME protection. I garantee you will still have fingers left over on one hand.


        Edit:

        It does NOT cost thousands of dollars for a lead inspection. A few hundred at best, in which case, why in God's name do contractors act like it is their money that is being spent for one? It is the customer that ends up paying for it, not us! Hell, in the end, it is the customer that gets an education over his or her HOME that is contaminated with lead and/or asbestos! All us the workers have to do is put it in the contract and explain to the customer that it is the law!

        Sheesh! Why do construction workers even complain about such things?
        If the lead is such a huge issue, why are these houses not condemned and bulldozed? BTW, I wear a mask when working with old plaster homes, but its my choice to wear one, I dont need some idiot in a suit telling me to, I do have a brain ya know. And if I didnt want to wear one, well thats my choice, why should the government care or better yet have the right to tell me I have to... As for the safety of the home owner, any good construction worker would know that dust is a problem for customers, regardless if it hazardous, last thing you want is the customers house covered in dust and them complaining. I tent off the rooms I work on when its an occupied house, its just common sense, again I dont need a stupid suit telling me that and threatening me with a fine to do so.

        As for the cost, bull crap its going to only cost a few hundred. And as to the cost not being an issue.... do you own your own business? Do you have customers that cost IS an issue, that every little extra fee that is added can and will effect their decision to go forward or not on a project?

        Now, truthfully, I maybe work on one house a year that may have lead or asbestos in it, as most of the work I do is in homes in the 70's and 80's era so it shouldn't be an issue, but its the principle of it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New OSHA "lead" mandates...

          they should really care about contactors.
          Alabama drywall installation contractors

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New OSHA "lead" mandates...

            Bulldozing the houses isn't necessary; the lead can be easily encapsulated if the surface is prepared properly. The real cost will arise if peeling paint is found and someone notifies an inspector about it while the people are living in the house. There is an increasing amount of "government enabled" people who think they can get some easy money if the kids are tested for lead; of course, if the kids were watched and not allowed to chew on the window sills like animals, their lead levels would likely be under the limit.
            I have a friend who fell under this situation; it cost her about $9,000 additional dollars to get a house able for re-renting due to the need to remove all the doors and trim, window trim, full solvent stripping of the exterior of the house, and re-painting. The testing to identify the problem was done by a government agency, but she did have to pay $300 for the final testing to be able to rent the house. She got in trouble because the tenant moved in and in the same month her son was tested due to his lethargy, he tested around 70 PPM lead in his blood, it was obvious to even the tester that this could not have happened in the week or so he was in her house, she had just painted all the trim and walls, so there was no peeling paint.
            Here, you have to take a 40 hour class to be certified for lead abatement supervision, there must be one person at the company with this certification. If additional workers are used, they have to take a 16 hour class. Most of it is common sense, do not make dust when cleaning or removing, if the walls are intact, loose paint is removed and repainting encapsulates the old lead in the paint. I would guess full demolition would be trickier, but the dust needs to be kept isolated with plastic sheeting, moisture, and masks are needed. Right now, there are no limitations for disposal of the plaster, etc. like they have for asbestos, but I'm sure they will get to that point. The certification is silly though, you have to pay the fees for the supervisor certification; and also pay and additional certification fee for the company, separate of the supervisor. It is about $495 a year for the fees.

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