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  • 2 1/8" Brad nailer

    Hi:

    I just purchased the Ridgid R213BNA air nailer to instll 3 1/4" pine baseboard and 2 1/4" pine door trim. Will this unit do the job. This will basically be used for a one time home remoeling job. I've installed a few peices without any issues, however, I just want to make sure I bought the correct unit for this small home fix up job.

    Kindest Regards
    Last edited by Truthfinder; 11-08-2010, 06:19 PM.

  • #2
    Re: 2 1/8" Brad nailer

    Truthfinder,

    Welcome to the Ridgid forum!

    I have both the Ridgid Brad Nailer and their Straight Finish Nailer. Depending on how much "nail" is required to hold the particular piece in place, is the determining factor for me. (Sometimes walls are even or the piece may be a bit more warped than I'd prefer.)

    But my preference is for using the Brad Nailer. Because of it's Teflon-seals, etc. it doesn't require pre-oiling; and, more importantly perhaps, it that the brad is slightly thinner and thus leaves less of an imprint.

    I just finished the trim molding in my kichen, which was all red oak, including the 3-1/2-inch base. The brad nailer worked perfectly and I used 2-inch brads. Very good holding power.

    I hope this helps,

    CWS

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    • #3
      Re: 2 1/8" Brad nailer

      I have a Hitachi 18g brad nailer that has been doing the trim work like you're planning just fine. Rarely, I will find that it isn't working and then I grab the finish nailer.

      But the finish nailers cost quite a bit more money than the 18g. I wouldn't get one for an occasional molding job... too much moolah... use a hammer and nail set, then spend the money you saved by not getting a finish nailer on football tickets or beer or something fun like that!

      If using the 18g, at every nailing location, drive two brads in at sharply opposing angles, instead of a single brad. They resist pulling out much better. This is helpful if you need your molding to flex a bit to conform to the wall.

      I'm lusting after a Grex 23g pin nailer. The 18g brads still leave a visible, ugly rectangular hole. The 23g pins don't. Many say that they don't even bother to fill the holes. Since I prefinish all my trim, I like that idea a lot. And, the 23g will be slick to use as glue clamps for fine woodworking, too... where I currently don't use any sort of nail.

      Good luck! Please do post back on how it went.

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