Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

    Hello,

    I'm in the process of framing my basement and need to build a lower ceiling to accomodate the hvac ducts. Here's my situation and questions. Most of this was existing when I moved in

    On what will be one side of the soffit, there is a structural beam that I have to work from. It runs the entire length of the soffit, approximately 20ft. There is a stud wall that is framed out already on the other side of the HVAC ducts, but not finished There is a dropped header already framed in that is about 12ft long and cant' be raised or lowered. The top of this wall is approximately 3/4" of an inch higher than the engineered beam--actually just a bit more than that. I am trying to conserve as much headroom as possible, but how to make up this 3/4" height difference is driving me nuts. If I lower one side, I lose headroom, and at 7ft exactly, I don't want to give up any if I have to. If I try to raise the other side, I run into clearance issues with the duct work. I've tried to find various widths of osb or plywood to add to the bottom of the head to lower it, but nothing seems to get me level. Closest I have gotten is about 1/4-3/8" over the 7ft span.

    _________________ engineered beam

    _____ header ____ Stud Wall 3/4" higher than beam.

    The span between beam and header is about 7ft.

    To complicate matters, two doors were framed in the stud wall that leaves me very little wiggle room in height. I know this is a poor description, so if not clear, let me know and I will try to clarify or get pics.

    Thank you
    Last edited by tkd; 02-03-2011, 06:00 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

    pics...sounds easy but so does alot of things on paper.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

      I have read this a few times and I can not envision what your discribing, or under stand what the problem is,

      it would seem to me if your 3/4" off, shim down the higher edge 3/4" and it would be level, but apparently I am missing some thing here,
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

        Ok, Here's an attempt at 3 pics.

        In the first pic, you can see the structural beam which is 85 1/4 from the floor which will form one edge of the soffit

        In the second pic, you can see the dropped beam a previous owner built that measures 86" from the floor and spans approximately 12ft between framed doorways. This is where the opposite edge of the soffit needs to be. but no lower.

        In the 3rd pic, you can see the ducting which is 86 3/4 at it's lowest point.

        The width is approximately 7 1/2 ft. What I am struggling with is how to secure a 2x4 or 2x3 on edge when there is a 3/4 drop. The challenge is presented by the ducting, not leaving me much room to work. If I notch a 2x to go around the ducting, it is only about 3/4" thick for a 3ft span, which I don't think is enough. The other challenge is I am trying to save headroom. I know the pics are bad and this sounds very simple on paper, but I've had 2 friends who have finished their basements look at it and 1 former house framer look at it and all are stumped. It's what I have to work with. If there is another pic angle, please let me know.

        Thanks in advance.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by tkd; 02-09-2011, 12:51 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

          I have used a supended celing in a situation like that one more or less has to build it from the side and slip it in as it happens, you can not easly lift the panles out but depending on how you run your Tees and so on usaly there is a space one can get them in and then work them over and then a cross tee and then an other panle,

          the other would be to us a 3/4 thick one by, (say a 1x4 or 1x6 even), and run a few eye bolts into it may be using a threaded insert so the bottom is flat, and smooth and then run a few wires up to support the center of it, and both sides of the duct work, and then screw on the dry wall to the bottom of the 1x s, or drop down some thing from a joist up above to run a few screws into to support it, on the ends put a cleat up to screw into,
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

            BHD,

            Thank you for taking the time to look at my challenge. Drop ceiling is something that I had thought of but was list as "not an option" by the my wife. The ceiling in that area will be drywall, end of story or so I'm told.

            I am thinking I'm going to have to rig something along the lines of running 2x on flat and then suspend some sort of bracing from the joists to keep it from sagging. The problem with that is that the ducts are about 3-4 inches apart, and of course, the middle of them is pretty much the middle of the soffit so room to work is tight to say the least. Hopefully, I'll have a moment of clarity and it will all come together.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

              I don't see what the big deal is...

              1.
              Pick the ceiling height you need to end up at.

              2.
              Fur anything out that is close to that height.

              3.
              Build a short stud "wall" to provide support between the ducts, the short stud "wall" will need to fit between the two lengths of duct and run parallel to them.

              The bottom plate will need to end up at the same height as your furred out height, measure accordingly.

              it will be easiest to attach the studs to the top plate, at the same spacing as the joists but offset by the width of one joist, nail or glue/screw the top plate to the underside of the joists and attach the bottom plate to the studs.

              4.
              Build another short stud support as required, to span the rest of the gap.

              5.
              Use 1/2" plywood just short of touching the duct work to sheet the ceiling just as you would drywall.

              This will provide the lateral connection of all of your supports... Rather than losing another 1.5" or so by using lumber below the ducts.

              6.
              Mark out where your duct runs, and hang the drywall under the ply, keep in mind where the duct is and make sure not the screw into it, but to use extra long screws to reach into the framing you added and not just the ply.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

                Originally posted by dlarrivee View Post
                I don't see what the big deal is...

                1.
                Pick the ceiling height you need to end up at.

                2.
                Fur anything out that is close to that height.

                3.
                Build a short stud "wall" to provide support between the ducts, the short stud "wall" will need to fit between the two lengths of duct and run parallel to them.

                The bottom plate will need to end up at the same height as your furred out height, measure accordingl

                it will be easiest to attach the studs to the top plate, at the same spacing as the joists but offset by the width of one joist, nail or glue/screw the top plate to the underside of the joists and attach the bottom plate to the studs.

                4.
                Build another short stud support as required, to span the rest of the gap.

                5.
                Use 1/2" plywood just short of touching the duct work to sheet the ceiling just as you would drywall.

                This will provide the lateral connection of all of your supports... Rather than losing another 1.5" or so by using lumber below the ducts.

                6.
                Mark out where your duct runs, and hang the drywall under the ply, keep in mind where the duct is and make sure not the screw into it, but to use extra long screws to reach into the framing you added and not just the ply.

                If you will pardon the pun, I think you just "nailed" it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

                  Dlarivee,

                  Thank you for the input. One quick question. As you mention building the short stud wall in step three, I have 1 limitation. The duct work is 4" apart and the builder ran the main gas line inbetween the ducts so I am a little tight on space. Would you recommend 2x2 or 2x4 for the vertical supports?

                  Thank you
                  Last edited by tkd; 02-10-2011, 10:37 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

                    I have done some quick measuring and I have 4.25" inches between the ducts and in that space is a host of electrical wire, the main ground for the breaker box which runs to the water line, and the main gas line for the house. Looks like I have to do some relocating unless you think that 1/2" ply could span more than about 4ft

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

                      Can you get lag screws in there? If you can, you could suspend a 2x on tie wires. You don't need struts going up to screw the ply or sheet rock.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

                        Originally posted by Pipestone Kid View Post
                        Can you get lag screws in there? If you can, you could suspend a 2x on tie wires. You don't need struts going up to screw the ply or sheet rock.
                        I agree, although I would try to build a 2x4 support on either side of the ducts rather than between them before trying a suspended style ceiling.

                        It's just easier to measure and cut lumber than fiddle with adjusting a ceiling hanger wire in ugly spaces I find.

                        How much room did the HVAC guy leave between the top of his ducts and the bottom of the joists by the way?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Question on framing extra wide soffit in basement

                          It would definitely be easier to build the supports on either side of the ducts, but that leaves a total span of 37 inches unsupported, which is the width of both ducts together. My guess is that is probably a little far in terms of sag potential.

                          With regards to how much space the Hvac guy left between the joists--the warm air duct is dropped 1 inch and the cold air return is tight against the joists.

                          I think it is possible to move the gas line over enough inbetween the ducts to get a 2x up there for a top plate, but it will take a little patience. I just haven't had a change to play with it.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X