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Securing a Grab Bar

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  • #16
    Re: Securing a Grab Bar

    Did you notice the tests were performed using 5/8 sheet rock? Maybe im old school, but I would do it right and secure to wood not a peice of sheet rock.
    26+6=1

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    • #17
      Re: Securing a Grab Bar

      Thats the whole point of this thread. Moen claims its tested to 1500#.

      Unless you hit a stud or have a floated tile wall, this looks like the next best thing other than cutting in wood backing.

      1500# is beyond belief, but that's the claim.

      Rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #18
        Re: Securing a Grab Bar

        I'm 145 lbs I guarantee I could pull that out of the wall with a good tug..

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        • #19
          Re: Securing a Grab Bar

          Here's the link to the hilti style. But looking at their pull out specs, they are only rated for 110# in 5/8" drywall.

          Hilti Online - HTB Toggler<sup>®</sup> Bolt

          Rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #20
            Re: Securing a Grab Bar

            Originally posted by seanny deep View Post
            I'm 145 lbs I guarantee I could pull that out of the wall with a good tug..
            I'll take that bet. You ever come down to LA, you're on!
            Buy cheap, buy twice.

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            • #21
              Re: Securing a Grab Bar

              The testing described in the video mentioned that it held up to 1500 lbs during static load testing, which sounds like a sample outlier and is a bit misleading because that's not the approved load rating. The technical specs for Moen's SecureMount say it's approved up to 300 lbs when used with 1/2" drywall (see link below). This is more than sufficient for my needs and is a load rating that sounds more realistic.

              http://www.moen.com/shared/docs/prod.../sma1000sp.pdf

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              • #22
                Re: Securing a Grab Bar

                Saw it today at lowes. $11.00 per fastener.

                The 1.25" hole in tile is not nice.

                Rick.
                phoebe it is

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                • #23
                  Project Complete!

                  I am posting back with my results. I wanted to install a grab bar in a vertical position next to a tub/shower. Since there is no stud in the wall where I want to put it, I settled on using Moen’s SecureMount which is like an oversized toggle bolt. Here is the after-action report:

                  First, I discovered that modern grab bars are available in several decorative styles. You wouldn’t know that from the stock in my local retail stores which carry the commercial style grab bars you see in public restrooms and hospitals. For a few dollars more, I purchased a good-looking polished chrome bar from an online store that carries Moen’s full product line (see stock photo attached). It closely matches the style of our towel bars and doesn’t detract from the appearance of a home bathroom.

                  The SecureMount toggle is 3.75” long and almost 1” wide, providing a lot of surface area for holding strength. However, as one of the posters cautioned, the plastic glide rails are not that rigid and I could see how the toggle might fall off if the rails got wobbly during the install. So I drilled a very tiny hole in the end of the plastic toggle and threaded a nylon fishing line through it. If the toggle fell off the rails or got misaligned during the install, I could simply pull it back through the hole and retry. (See photo attached of the toggle after I drilled a hole in it.)

                  Starting at the top mounting location, I drilled a 1.25” hole in drywall using a standard drill saw, inserted the SecureMount, and fastened it like the instructions/video show. It worked exactly as designed, so I just pulled out the fishing line and was left with a perfect mount.

                  Next, I attempted to do the same for the bottom mount. But when I drilled the hole, the pilot bit hit something solid. Ugh, I realized there was a horizontal brace in the wall that I did not detect with my studfinder. When I was looking for blocking behind the drywall, I swept the studfinder from left to right looking for a vertical stud. I did not think to sweep from top to bottom to detect a horizontal brace. That was an amateur’s mistake. Lesson learned.

                  So for the bottom mount, I followed the alternative instructions for a stud, which is simply to use wood screws through the SecureMount mounting plate. Note that if you use the SecureMount for one side of the bar, you should also use it for the other side even if there is a stud because the SecureMount mounting plate and gasket raise the bar off the wall a little bit. To keep the bar evenly spaced from the wall, you need to use the SecureMount plate/gasket on both sides.

                  The installation was successful, even if it didn’t go exactly as planned. The YouTube video was very helpful as it gave me the confidence to tackle this project. I watched it again just before I started the work. And thanks to everyone who contributed to this thread. The warning about the potential for the toggle to fall off prompted me to attach the fishing line as a fail-safe.

                  One final note for other homeowners: This installation was a simple DIY project because I was mounting to drywall just outside the shower. Mounting to shower tile, marble, or a fiberglass surface is more complex. Tile and marble require diamond-tipped bits and bracing tools to prevent cracking. These items may not be cost-effective to purchase for a single-use project. And fiberglass/plastic enclosures require a different mount that involves a spacer between the fiberglass and the wall. And I don’t even know how effective a studfinder is when you are going through tile or the wide empty space of a fiberglass surround. And you need to avoid the pipes in the wall. Given all the risks of botching it, I would hire a pro for installing a grab bar inside the shower.
                  Attached Files

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