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  • Paint Removal tool options

    Just got quite a bit of 2x redwood planks that came off an old deck. Most of the boards are 12' and vary in width up to 14" but the majority is 8" wide. No nails or screws and am planning on building outdoor furniture with it. What's the best tools to remove the paint?
    Buy cheap, buy twice.

  • #2
    Re: Paint Removal tool options

    Is it oil base, latex, or stain?

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    • #3
      Re: Paint Removal tool options

      Not sure...how would I find out? Don't think it's stain.
      Buy cheap, buy twice.

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      • #4
        Re: Paint Removal tool options

        Power washer turbo nozzle. Start low pressure and ramp up til paint pops off but doesn't scar the wood. Redwood is fairly dense right?

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        • #5
          Re: Paint Removal tool options

          I don't think it is.
          Buy cheap, buy twice.

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          • #6
            Re: Paint Removal tool options

            Someone gave me a truckload of painted 1x8 cedar planks that varied in length from six to twelve feet. I just did a light dressing on an old set of knives and ran 'em through the planer. Worked perfectly.
            "HONK if you've never seen a gun fired from a moving Harley"

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            • #7
              Re: Paint Removal tool options

              Originally posted by Doctordeere View Post
              Someone gave me a truckload of painted 1x8 cedar planks that varied in length from six to twelve feet. I just did a light dressing on an old set of knives and ran 'em through the planer. Worked perfectly.
              Exactly why I asked what kind of paint. Older oil base had lead in it and is really tough on a newer set of knives.

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              • #8
                Re: Paint Removal tool options

                Pressure washer will give it the weathered, sand blasted look. Too ruff for furniture.

                Fastest way is the planer as long as there's no nails or screws. But then you still possible have the edges with paint and that will need a jointer or hand planer.

                Chemical stripper will work, but its lots of labor and messy.

                Depending on the paint age, lead paint would date back to the late 70's. So it's probably a latex.

                Sanding is no fun unless you rent a floor sander and have a way to secure at least 18-24" wide at a time.

                Rick.
                phoebe it is

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                • #9
                  Re: Paint Removal tool options

                  The deck is 10 years old so I don't believe there's any lead in it.
                  Buy cheap, buy twice.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Paint Removal tool options

                    Originally posted by Doctordeere View Post
                    Someone gave me a truckload of painted 1x8 cedar planks that varied in length from six to twelve feet. I just did a light dressing on an old set of knives and ran 'em through the planer. Worked perfectly.
                    I think is your best bet. You can take a skim cut and won't lose much in thickness at all, plus you will dress up the faces which will make for a smoother surface when you are done. You should be able to find someone to plane it for you for less than the cost of a planer if you don't own one or want to buy one. If you are looking at buying a lunchbx planer then I suggest the DeWalt DW735. I think the newest version has a spiral cutter with segmented bits, each with four cutting edges so you have in effect four sets of knives.

                    Fastest way is the planer as long as there's no nails or screws. But then you
                    still possible have the edges with paint and that will need a jointer or hand
                    planer.
                    The edges can be handled with the table saw easily. Rip one edge square to a face, then rip to the required width.

                    Your sanding should be minimal if you plane all your pieces, and there is a marked difference in the appearance of the wood with a planed surface and one that is sanded, so maybe try each out with your finish of choice applied on a couple scrap pieces first.
                    Last edited by Bob D.; 06-21-2013, 05:52 AM.
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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                    • #11
                      Re: Paint Removal tool options

                      Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                      The edges can be handled with the table saw easily. Rip one edge square to a face, then rip to the required width.
                      The cedar I had was rough cut, had to be dressed anyway. Planed both faces, ripped both edges and then ran through a jointer. Lots of work, but that was some beautiful wood when all was said and done. Don't know how many board feet it was, but there was enough to panel a decent sized room (although that's not what it got used for). I might add that this project also taught me that the difference in price between a cheap biscuit jointer and a decent one is no bargain.
                      "HONK if you've never seen a gun fired from a moving Harley"

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                      • #12
                        Re: Paint Removal tool options

                        I resided my home last year and replaced all the cedar trim boards. I just could not throw them away so I used my planer to remove the 4 or 5 coats of latex paint. It sure was a chore but worth it. The paint got gummy from the heat and it took many passes to get them down to good wood. Cost me a set of knives but I ended up with several hundred feet of clear cedar.
                        Charles

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                        • #13
                          Re: Paint Removal tool options

                          NW...you mean a hand planer or surface planer?
                          Buy cheap, buy twice.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Paint Removal tool options

                            I used my 13" power thickness plainer. I sure have found a bunch of uses for the clear cedar.
                            Charles

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