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  • Dry Lok

    Still trying to make a decision on re-painting old brick house. I cleaned a 4' x 4' section, appears to be ac ombination of efflourescence and old primer causing the paint to come off. There also is some evidence of the mortar softening in places. So, I scrubbed the area with TSP, rinsed, then cleaned with 10 % muratic acid, rinsed. I allowed it to dry. I also did the same to a brick I found in the basement. I then applied the Dry-Lok Extreme to this area as well as the face of the brick. I broke the brick afte curing and you can see evidnece of the Dry-Lok absorbing into the brick pores. So, now I have a question for anyone who might have used this stuff. If it does absorb into the brick pores and it also seems to have hardened the soft mortar somewhat, will this cause problems down the road if the efflorescence comes back and possibly would force the face of the brick to de-laminate? I've got a 36 foot by 56 foot wall to treat, and want to make sure it is going to work well before doing anything more. Any suggestions or observations will be appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Dry Lok

    I would start with removing all the soft mortar and put in new. The more stable the surface the better off you will be. Try calling DryLok for detailed information.
    Hope your project goes well.
    Roots beware of the C snake with shark teeth.

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    • #3
      Re: Dry Lok

      I'd be cautious of raking out the old brick mortar and putting in new composition, Portland
      cement based mortar.

      The mortar needs to be matched to the brick. If the mortar is too hard you could create
      problems with the brick that could affect the structural integrity of the wall. Not sure but
      using that 10% acid on the old mortar might be asking for trouble. Did you talk to anyone
      before you did this. You say 'old brick house', but how old? Around here 'old' would be
      before 1900 on back to 1675. Old brick mortar used lime or other similar local materials
      such as ground up clam or oyster shells (at least here in the Colonies).

      I would suggest you at least talk to some masons who have been around a while and
      have some experience with this if you haven't already.

      It's not a one day job, there are a number of steps to doing this right. You can shortcut it
      but you'll be sorry down the road when its crumbing again in a couple years.
      Last edited by Bob D.; 09-21-2013, 06:05 AM.
      ---------------
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      ---------------
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      ---------
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      • #4
        Re: Dry Lok

        Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
        I would suggest you at least talk to some masons who have been around a while and
        have some experience with this if you haven't already.
        I agree with the Strawboss. Those in your area for a long time will be the best help.

        A house here that was built in the late 1800's used goats milk and horse hair with some other stuff for mortar. It still looks in good shape.
        Roots beware of the C snake with shark teeth.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Dry Lok

          I would clean the wall with sure klean & a power washer.

          Then coat the wall with Thorocoat

          Efflorescence is cause by water passing through & leaving the salts behind on the surface.

          Any protective coating will stop this for how long depends on the surface prep. & quality of the sealer applied.

          If you go to a masonry supply store there should be someone there that can walk you through the process.

          Without seeing the wall & assuming you will be working off a ladder it will probably take you 2 - 4 days to complete the job.

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