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  • Watering Down New Roof...

    My neighbor is getting a new roof. Why are the installers routinely watering down the roof before and after installing the shingles? It's partly cloudy and 85 degrees.

  • #2
    You want to work on a hot tin roof.

    I've never seen it done as it makes a mess.

    Are they stripping the old shingles?

    Rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
      You want to work on a hot tin roof.

      I've never seen it done as it makes a mess.

      Are they stripping the old shingles?

      Rick.


      Yes they totally stripped the roof. We had a very bad hail storm several weeks ago so everybody in my neighborhood is getting a new roof. I just never seen anyone frequently water the roof during installation. I would think this would create problems???

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm NOT a professional roofer, but in my past, I've helped on a number of asphalt shingle jobs with friends and relatives and have done a couple of smaller shingle jobs on my own house. I've always lived here in the northeast (if that makes a difference). Is this an asphalt-shingle roof or something different?

        From my experience, you want that roof to be as dry as possible (like completely dry). Whenever I've worked on a roof, I've removed the old shingles (I don't like to shingle over what may be existing), usually having to also remove the old tar paper (felt) and getting down to the bare wood. Often sections of that might need to be replaced, if rotted, warped, or otherwise not in good shape.

        New felt paper is installed with a generous overlap, and in some cases I've seen two layers applied (ice damming here in the NE), and then the shingles laid down But through it all, the roof must be dry and some effort is made to keep it that way! When we leave the job, we make sure the unshingle areas are tarp covered securely to keep out any sudden rain or heavy dew from the night.

        SO, I don't understand any process in which anyone would intentionally wet down the roof before shingles or the felt is applied. Seems like they would be trapping moisture when the roofing material is installed and that would lead to mold and rot (mildew at the least).

        The other concern whenever I've worked on a roof, is that you don't do it in the cold weather if at all possible. While working in the heat is horrible (not only uncomfortable, but asphalt shingles are more susceptible to damage), you do want the warmer weather and the heat from the sun to help asphalt shingles to seal to each other. Installing them in cold weather may well leave the tabs brittle and unsealed and therefore present the possibility of wind damage during the winter.

        Like a I said, I'm not a professional roofer, and certainly I haven't kept up with new technological changes... but wetting down a roof during the installation of an asphalt roof doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

        CWS
        Last edited by CWSmith; 06-24-2018, 06:58 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          I've also seen brick layer hose the roof very often so there wasn't any mortar bits when he demolished the old chimeney because he said they are like banana peels and you fall off the roof pretty quick.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
            I'm NOT a professional roofer, but in my past, I've helped on a number of asphalt shingle jobs with friends and relatives and have done a couple of smaller shingle jobs on my own house. I've always lived here in the northeast (if that makes a difference). Is this an asphalt-shingle roof or something different?

            From my experience, you want that roof to be as dry as possible (like completely dry). Whenever I've worked on a roof, I've removed the old shingles (I don't like to shingle over what may be existing), usually having to also remove the old tar paper (felt) and getting down to the bare wood. Often sections of that might need to be replaced, if rotted, warped, or otherwise not in good shape.

            New felt paper is installed with a generous overlap, and in some cases I've seen two layers applied (ice damming here in the NE), and then the shingles laid down But through it all, the roof must be dry and some effort is made to keep it that way! When we leave the job, we make sure the unshingle areas are tarp covered securely to keep out any sudden rain or heavy dew from the night.

            SO, I don't understand any process in which anyone would intentionally wet down the roof before shingles or the felt is applied. Seems like they would be trapping moisture when the roofing material is installed and that would lead to mold and rot (mildew at the least).

            The other concern whenever I've worked on a roof, is that you don't do it in the cold weather if at all possible. While working in the heat is horrible (not only uncomfortable, but asphalt shingles are more susceptible to damage), you do want the warmer weather and the heat from the sun to help asphalt shingles to seal to each other. Installing them in cold weather may well leave the tabs brittle and unsealed and therefore present the possibility of wind damage during the winter.

            Like a I said, I'm not a professional roofer, and certainly I haven't kept up with new technological changes... but wetting down a roof during the installation of an asphalt roof doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

            CWS


            They are asphalt shingles and he was applying the water (with a garden hose and end sprayer) to the already installed felt and the already installed shingles.

            Strange.....

            Comment


            • #7
              Probably their way of checking for leaks. The felt is the moisture barrier the shingles protect the felt

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              • #8
                I started roofing in 1962 . MOST STUPID THING I'VE EVER HEARD !!!
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was on new construction jobs for 18 years.

                  On a large 200 unit project I saw the carpet layer using a watering can to wet the new carpets during install. I asked what that did and his answer was it makes the carpet stretch easier.

                  Never ever seen another carpet layer do that.

                  Rick.
                  phoebe it is

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    They do it to cool off the roof.

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                    • #11
                      I have never wet or cooled the shingles down, but on a hot day you can really tear up asphalt shinges, as they get hot,
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                      • Bob D.
                        Bob D. commented
                        Editing a comment
                        And they will tear you up too. Even with gloves on I was on the garage roof a couple weeks ago and the roof was so hot it was burning my palms through the leather gloves.

                    • #12
                      My grandpops used to do this whenever he would do a roofing job back in the day. Not sure why and never asked, but I'm assuming it was to cool the roof down on a hot day. So the shingles wouldn't get ruined as they walked on them after install? Just a guess.

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