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  • SEE Snake ScOUT

    I'd like some input on the scout. What's your opinion on it and having to be right over the transmitter for it to locate?

    Don't all see snakes transmit down the cable along with the head?

    thank you!

  • #2
    Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

    Originally posted by ChrisConnor View Post
    I'd like some input on the scout. What's your opinion on it and having to be right over the transmitter for it to locate?

    Don't all see snakes transmit down the cable along with the head?

    thank you!
    Let me answer you that...

    I'm kidding...don't know nothin about it...i know only it beeps..makes weird nosie like when you are detecting radiation?? You know the show jericho?

    You will have to wait for my hubby to answer on this one

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

      I have the NaviTrack and have never used a Scout so I am not sure what you are asking. If you are asking why it does not give you false readings and is the most exact locator out there I would have to say it operates the same as my NaviTrack.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

        Navitrac locators are the best on the market. I have had both in my history, first the full size navitrac, a bit large witht he case and all, but very accurate! great if you are doing alot of deep locations, 14' and below, as for the scout, very compact, better then the full size, only problem is if the depth is 14-15 or more, can't pick the signal up very well, atleast not well enough for me to chance it at 15.' I still get a signal but it runs like at 250.

        Easy, mark the 2 posts witht he red markers, you will direction then, and then find the middle between both red markers and thats your head.

        very, very well made!! Well worth the $1200.00. I also use it with my ridgid brick transmitter to locate utilities.
        sigpic

        Robert

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        • #5
          Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

          If I am following your question right. The scout will only locate where the transmitter is located in the pipe. You have to move the camera transmitter in or out of the pipe to determine direction of pipe. If you want to find the pipe direction without having to do that, then you would need to run a cable in the drain, and use a navitrack locator. You can energize the snake and follow it down the line, with that unit.

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          • #6
            Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

            when I am locating, I get my direction from the markers I use to locate the posts on my transmitter screen, the posts, when marked with the red markers give a direction, hard to explain, I see what your saying about energizing the whole cable, might speed things up a bit, but I can still map a 60' sewer that changes directions mutliple times, in approx 15 mins, if thats all I'm doing, no visual inspection.
            sigpic

            Robert

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            • #7
              Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

              I was told that all seesnakes have built in transmitters that allow you to track the pushrod along with a 512 transmitter in the camera head. Is this correct?

              As to the scout, I was told that in order to get a depth reading you had to turn the scout ninety degrees and that it was more trouble than a regular Navitrak. I had a regular navitrak until a break in a few weeks ago and was pleased with it overall, but was considering the sCout if it did the same thing for less $$$$


              I hope this clears things up.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

                Originally posted by ChrisConnor View Post
                I was told that all seesnakes have built in transmitters that allow you to track the pushrod along with a 512 transmitter in the camera head. Is this correct? as far as i know only the 512 hz. in the camera head. nothing in the pushrod. the 512hz. came standard for the last 6-7 years. the first couple of years out it was an accessory.

                As to the scout, I was told that in order to get a depth reading you had to turn the scout ninety degrees and that it was more trouble than a regular Navitrak. I had a regular navitrak until a break in a few weeks ago and was pleased with it overall, but was considering the sCout if it did the same thing for less $$$$


                I hope this clears things up.
                the only time you need to turn/ rotate the scout is when it prompts you to. half the time it's not necessary. and if you need to, it shows you what direction. only takes an extra second to do this.

                the scout has worked fine for me for the last couple of years.

                you should have no problem to adjust to it.

                rick.
                phoebe it is

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

                  With the scout locator, when you have located the camera head or remote transmitter in the pipe, when prompted to, you rotate the scout unit about a 1/4 turn or so, and it will gives you the depth reading of the transmitter. You can get a forced reading for depth also, by pushing a button on the unit. I think it works very well in most cases. But will not work for locating other cables and electrical lines like the navitrack.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

                    The Scout can be used to trace lines. It comes with 4 different frequencies to trace lines as well as a passive AC feature. However, in normal operating mode, the bottom antenna node is located well above the ground. If your line trace signal is being pushed or pulled due to something in the ground distorting it, the further away your antenna node is to the ground, the lower your accuracy.

                    The NaviTrack has more features to make line tracing easier and it's bottom antenna node in normal operation is located just above the ground.

                    If you are doing a lot of line tracing, the ultimate in information is the SR-20. It has the most features to tell you when the field is distorted. It also is the most feature rich of the RIDGID locators.

                    As for tracing the push cable on your camera. All of our cameras come equipped with a 512Hz sonde at the camera head that can be located and used to map out a pipe by locting the camera head, moving the camera head and relocating it.

                    There is not currently any transmitter built into the push cables. I have heard of guys wrapping the inductive signal clamp around it and I have heard of guys un-hooking the reel and connecting to the ground pin with their transmitter and transmitting a signal down the line. If you use the inductive signal clamp keep the unit plugged in. The frequencies of 8k or 33k should work the best.
                    Mark F. Fleming<br />Product Manager<br />RIDGID/Kollmann

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                    • #11
                      Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

                      Would you say that the Scout is as good as the navitrak II in locating a seesnake?

                      I understand the distance differences regarding the bottom antenna, but isn't this a negligable setback unless you have a giant for an operator?

                      What I am asking is would I regret buying a Scout in lieu of a Navitrak II?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

                        If all you want to do is locate the sonde at the end of the camera head, than the Scout is the unit for you. Its compact size will come in handy when you are in tight spots, it is easy to understand and it does a great job.

                        To the degree that you need to trace lines is the degree that you should move up to the NaviTrack or the SR-20.
                        Mark F. Fleming<br />Product Manager<br />RIDGID/Kollmann

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: SEE Snake ScOUT

                          Thank you. I rarely trace lines. Before my last navitrak was stolen I had tried to locate but a few lines and none of them were very deep.

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