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video cam not working on seesnake

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  • video cam not working on seesnake

    Does anybody have any idea about this. I go to plug in my digital hard drive camcorder into my SeeSnake compact to record drain inspections and when the connection is made the SeeSnake monitor gets very wavy and it moves around making it impossible to see. The camcorder does not read that it is plugged into the seesnake and wants to record what it is pointed at as it normally would. Totally bummed out and any info is greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: video cam not working on seesnake

    Sounds like your getting some kind of cross connection/short, but thats just a guess.
    Stick around and/or check back. Many here that can help, even the Ridgid Engineers check in now and then.
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    • #3
      Re: video cam not working on seesnake

      Originally posted by Trevor View Post
      Does anybody have any idea about this. I go to plug in my digital hard drive camcorder into my SeeSnake compact to record drain inspections and when the connection is made the SeeSnake monitor gets very wavy and it moves around making it impossible to see. The camcorder does not read that it is plugged into the seesnake and wants to record what it is pointed at as it normally would. Totally bummed out and any info is greatly appreciated.

      Make / model of camcorder, please?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: video cam not working on seesnake

        Your camcorder is set to CAMERA mode, which means it is outputting a signal back to the CCU's video output jack.

        To record from an external source, the camcorder must be set to Playback mode. You do this by setting the Camcorder's power switch to Play (or Playback, or VTR, depending on the brand and model) instead of Camera. IF the camcorder has video input capability (many do not), you will see the SeeSnake camera's image on the camcorder's monitor.

        NOTES:

        • Most high-def camcorders lack this function; if it does have this function, it can only be enabled AFTER the camcorder has been set to record in standard-def mode; if the camcorder is set to high-def mode the feature may be grayed out or not show up in the menu at all.
        • In most cases, the video input function must be enabled in the camcorder's menu. On some camcorders (Sony, for one) the video input function will stay enabled and the camcorder will automatically detect and switch over to the external inputs whenever a source is connected. In other camcorders (Canon, for example), the video input feature must be enabled every time the camcorder is powered ON.
        • Some cameras with this capability (the Canon HV20, for example) hide it very well, so reading the instructions is a must.

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        • #5
          Re: video cam not working on seesnake

          It is a JVC, Everio HDD. Bought brand new in Nov, so I am sure it is a 2008

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          • #6
            Re: video cam not working on seesnake

            We have people that have seen this exact issue before. When your camcorder is set to CAMERA mode, it will be outputting a signal back to the CCU's video output jack.

            To record from an external source, the camcorder must be set to Playback mode. You do this by setting the Camcorder's power switch to Play (or Playback, or VTR, depending on the brand and model) instead of Camera. IF the camcorder has video input capability (many do not), he will see the SeeSnake camera's image on his camcorder's monitor.

            NOTES:
            • Most high-def camcorders lack this function; if it does have this function, it can only be enabled AFTER the camcorder has been set to record in standard-def mode; if the camcorder is set to high-def mode the feature may be grayed out or not show up in the menu at all.
            • In most cases, the video input function must be enabled in the camcorder's menu. On some camcorders (Sony, for one) the video input function will stay enabled and the camcorder will automatically detect and switch over to the external inputs whenever a source is connected. In other camcorders (Canon, for example), the video input feature must be enabled every time the camcorder is powered ON.
            Some cameras with this capability (the Canon HV20, for example) hide it very well, so reading the instructions is a must.


            GS

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            • #7
              Re: video cam not working on seesnake

              What TCY said.

              That's why I asked what kind of cam you were using.

              Let us know what happens.

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              • #8
                Re: Brass air fittings

                Originally posted by rqdsb250
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                used some of the parts to make my babington wvo burner.
                Last edited by ToUtahNow; 01-16-2009, 02:01 PM. Reason: altering link
                http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

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                • #9
                  Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                  I havent been able to find a camcorder that has video in for a long time. You guys are really on top of the diagnosis. As soon as I read it I knew what the problem was but the answer was up right away.

                  Most definitely your ouputing a signal to the output on the monitor. Thats why its getting a messed up signal.

                  Josh

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                  • #10
                    Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                    The Canon HV30 and HV40 both have video inputs. Here's the blurb from Canon's website:

                    "Analog-Digital Converter lets you... feed the analog signal... to your VIXIA HV40 to convert the signal to digital for recording on DV tape".

                    These cameras are HDV (a consumer/semi-pro high-def format) and produce stunning images. They can also have an SD card and can snap 3MP still images. You can find the HV30 at B&H Photo (very reliable mail-order place) for less than $600:

                    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...Camcorder.html

                    The HV20, which I own, also has this feature and it works great. This is a recently discontinued model and you may be able to find it at a bargain price.

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                    • #11
                      Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                      Originally posted by irguy View Post
                      The Canon HV30 and HV40 both have video inputs. Here's the blurb from Canon's website:

                      "Analog-Digital Converter lets you... feed the analog signal... to your VIXIA HV40 to convert the signal to digital for recording on DV tape".

                      These cameras are HDV (a consumer/semi-pro high-def format) and produce stunning images. They can also have an SD card and can snap 3MP still images. You can find the HV30 at B&H Photo (very reliable mail-order place) for less than $600:

                      http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...Camcorder.html

                      The HV20, which I own, also has this feature and it works great. This is a recently discontinued model and you may be able to find it at a bargain price.
                      Yeah but if you feed a composite video signal to a HDV camera, you won't gain anything. It doesn't get converted to HD. HD must be sourced as HD from the imaging sensor(s) in the camera. The real-world resolution of NTSC analog video is something like 704 x 480 under ideal conditions. And half that (352 x 240) when recorded to VHS. Any rez over that is wasted. It's just not there in the source no matter what the capabilities of the recording device.

                      You DO get the benefit of recording to DV tape, though, which should give a better (less noisy) picture than analog VHS or Hi-8. But still not as good as recording to a hard drive or DVD - tape has noise and dropout problems even when the data being written to it is in digital format.

                      The lack of any QC on VHS tapes of ANY kind (10% plus defective right out of the box no matter which brand) is what drove me toward an all-digital recording chain.

                      No more tapes, no more aggravation.

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                      • #12
                        Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                        Originally posted by Vance G View Post
                        The lack of any QC on VHS tapes of ANY kind (10% plus defective right out of the box no matter which brand) is what drove me toward an all-digital recording chain.
                        Which digital recorder do you use and how long ago did you buy it?

                        You're absolutely correct about the high-def format not being an advantage. I only recommended the HV30/HV40 because they're all I could find that offer this function at a reasonable cost.

                        In terms of tape issues, DV tape is subject to dropouts, but fortunately they've been relatively few and far between for me. Tape noise isn't an issue because the video signal is converted to a bunch of ones and zeroes before it ever reaches the tape, so the information is either there, or not there (dropouts).

                        The reason you may see a quality difference between disk-based units and DV camcorders is because DV camcorders use DV compression, and when you convert from DV to DVD, which uses MPEG2 compression, you lose about 30% of your color resolution.

                        To make a long story short, you'll get the highest quality when the input format (what you record your inspection on) matches or exceeds your output format (what you give your customer).

                        From what I've seen, MPEG2 gives the best result, followed by DV. I've experimented with portable devices that record in the MPEG4 format (Archos, Neuros, etc.) but found the quality to be quite poor.

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                        • #13
                          Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                          I use an Archos 704 and a 705 - 2500kB/sec MPEG4 640X480 @29.97 - 32kHz IMA ADPCM audio.

                          I find the MPEG 4 video to be pretty darn good. I don't see any apparent degradation of video when converted to 2-pass VBR MPEG2 using TMPGENC under real world conditions.

                          By real world conditions, I mean watching the clip AS INTENDED at 640X480 @ 29.97 frames/sec. NOT taking individual frames and comparing them source to compressed. You can ALWAYS see differences/artifacts when you do that, especially if you try to compress something like a 4" line full of water and toilet paper particles. Too many moving "things" - very difficult to compress within the constraints of MPEG2 if you want to fit an hour on a single layer DVD. But when you watch it as intended, it looks fine. That is what matters. My customers are happy. I am not trying to do HD here - it's a sewer line after all.

                          xVid has a whole slew of post-processing options (decode) that help as well.

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                          • #14
                            Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                            Great information, thanks!

                            You obviously have this workflow down to a science. What benefit do you see from recording to MPEG4 and then converting the footage to MPEG2 and writing a DVD? On average, approximately how long does this take?

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                            • #15
                              Re: video cam not working on seesnake

                              I record to MPEG4 because that's what the ARCHOS does. You can't change it.

                              You CAN up the bitrate, though. I always run at the max. 2500kBit /sec.

                              Even at max, I can easily get 40 hours on the 80G hard drive on the 704.

                              I download from the ARCHOS to my desktop PC and encode to VBR MPEG2 [704 x 480 (640 x 480 letterboxed) 29.97 fps 6000kbits/sec average 6500 peak motion search precision Normal] with TMPGENC, creating a separate M2V and WAV file.

                              Then encode the .WAV file to 192K AC3 with FFMPEG (for DVD compatibility).

                              Then author the M2V and AC3 to DVD with TMPGEnc Author and burn them with Nero 6.

                              It takes roughly twice the time of the clip length to do 2-pass VBR on my 2.8G dual-processor Xeon box (4 logical processors). Encoding the wav to AC3 take a few seconds.

                              I don't archive the MPEG2, I always keep the MPEG4 for that. Much easier to edit than MPEG2. I only use the MPEG2 to create DVD's when customers want them.

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