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  • Float Scondes

    Anybody used these floating scondes? I have to locate a septic tank and this looks like the fastest way. Are these a one time use...or you gotta go through the good stuff to get it back?

  • #2
    Re: Float Scondes

    To each his own but my Pop's has located more septic tanks than most plumbers have come into contact with as he has been a septic contractor going on 40 years.

    How?

    With a simple T-Handle metal probe. Usually found in less than ten minutes.

    Sondes work. They are reusable to my knowledge. Have to retrieve them or string them on a fishing pole before the flush.

    J.C.
    Last edited by BobsPlumbing; 11-10-2009, 10:41 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Float Scondes

      i have the plastic floating sonde. never used this one, but i have lost a couple of the old floating sondes from prototek

      broke the mason string on the toilet horn twice

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Re: Float Scondes

        a local pumper company uses them to locate tanks. if they can't recover the sonde there is a $50 fee for the sonde

        don't know what kind they use though

        steve
        In the never ending struggle to keep the water flowing.... The Poo Poo Cowboy rides again!!!

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        • #5
          Re: Float Scondes

          Originally posted by British Plumber View Post
          Anybody used these floating scondes? I have to locate a septic tank and this looks like the fastest way. Are these a one time use...or you gotta go through the good stuff to get it back?

          Over the past 20+ years, I've tried 'em all - floaters in a capsule on a string, transmitters taped on to a snake, pushed in with fishtape, etc.

          Using a camera beats ALL of them, hands down. It is FAR too easy to mistake a vertical or near vertical piece of pipe for the tank baffle.

          For flushers, the line needs to be in PERFECT shape or they won't go anywhere. The problem has only gotten worse with low-flow toilets. You need buckets and buckets of water in addition to the wimpy flush to move anything.

          Then there's the problem of having your retrieve string cut by sharp edges in the toilet trap caused by lack of quality control by the toliet mgfr.

          I build all my own transmitters so I never cared much about losing them from a $$$ standpoint, but it was taking up a lot of my time on the weekends building new ones.

          Camera is the way to go. You can SEE when you're in the right place.

          I realize this isn't an option for you if you only need to do this once.

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          • #6
            Re: Float Scondes

            Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
            To each his own but my Pop's has located more septic tanks than most plumbers have come into contact with as he has been a septic contractor going on 40 years.

            How?

            With a simple T-Handle metal probe. Usually found in less than ten minutes.

            Sondes work. They are reusable to my knowledge. Have to retrieve them or string them on a fishing pole before the flush.

            J.C.
            Ah, JC, you must live somewhere where you actually HAVE what would be considered "soil".

            Down in AZ, our native soil consists of rocks of varying sizes. Not a good fit for a probe. Impacto-Tool works OK as long as you're ready to fix anything you might break while using it.

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            • #7
              Re: Float Scondes

              I have a sonde that attaches to the end of the cable on my machine. It works good for the most part until it goes vertical. As was previously stated it is easy to confuse a vertical pipe for a baffle.

              If you only need to find one tank, the probe is the easiest. Beware of hidden wires/gas lines/water lines/etc.. We inadvertantly located a propane line looking for a tank.

              If you can't probe then digging up the line and taking pot shots every couple of feet would be the next cheapest method.

              Look for teltale signs in the yard. An out of place depression, a dead or green spot. You might be able to see the drainfield lines and work backward toward the tank. Look for dead or green stripes or ditches.

              Let me know if you need any advice. I'll do my best to steer you in the right direction.
              www.ClinkscalesSeptic.com

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