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  • SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

    Hey there,

    I just rented a Seesnake Compact model for a specialized job and really liked the performance! Awesome product Ridgid? I noticed that the monitor has a "video input/output" port. Does anyone know if this can be used to attach to an external recording device (camcorder, laptop, Ridgid DVDpack, etc.)?

    Also, does the compact use the same pushrod and head as the new MicroExplorer?

    I'm contemplating purchase of one of the 2 and was leaning towards the MicroExplorer until today's experiment. What do you guys think?

    Side note, I'm really impressed with advances that Ridgid has made with the product line since my ancient Seesnake plus B/W VCR!

    Also, thanks to Ridgid and everyone on this Forum for the productive, educational and FUN way to keep up on trends in the plumbing industry!

    -Chris Swade
    Henry Swade Plumbing, Inc.
    Est. 1905

  • #2
    Re: SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

    See below in Blue

    Originally posted by Swade Plumbing View Post
    Hey there,

    I just rented a Seesnake Compact model for a specialized job and really liked the performance! Awesome product Ridgid? I noticed that the monitor has a "video input/output" port. Does anyone know if this can be used to attach to an external recording device (camcorder, laptop, Ridgid DVDpack, etc.)?

    Yes.. video out can be used to hook up to external recording device.

    Also, does the compact use the same pushrod and head as the new MicroExplorer?

    Not sure what your asking here. If your talking about the microDrain... no the cable isnt the same. The compact cable is stiffer so it can be pushed further. however, it cant make as tight of a turn as the microDrain. The camera head on the Compact is also larger than the microDrain camaera head.

    I'm contemplating purchase of one of the 2 and was leaning towards the MicroExplorer until today's experiment. What do you guys think?

    It all depends on your application. Line size, what type of manuvurability do you need (small diameter P-traps, toilet traps, etc.) There is also a difference in portability and recording capabilities... all needs to be weighed out.

    Side note, I'm really impressed with advances that Ridgid has made with the product line since my ancient Seesnake plus B/W VCR!

    Thanks

    Also, thanks to Ridgid and everyone on this Forum for the productive, educational and FUN way to keep up on trends in the plumbing industry!

    -Chris Swade
    Henry Swade Plumbing, Inc.
    Est. 1905

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

      Thanks for the quick reply Josh!

      I'm envisioning using the smaller camera for 1-1/2 and 2" drains (no trap smaller than 2") and for 4" lateral runs. I use the Seesnake Plus for my 6" clay mains.

      I saw the video on the forum of the MicroDrain going through a toilet trap and was thoroughly impressed. That's what made me consider a smaller camera.

      So here's my next question

      How far can the MicroDrain be pushed out in a 4" drain from a clean out or closet opening with no more than 3 bends? I rarely have to go farther than 65'-75'', so is the Micro pushrod stiff enough to make that happen?

      Also, I like the SD card function, but is there a video out too?

      Guys with the Microdrain: Tell me what you use it for and how frequently?

      Thanks,

      Chris

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

        I would say the MicroDrain works great even in lines as small as 1 inch however the cable is very flexible and currently only has 30 ft of push cable. You will have to wait a little longer for the new MicroDrain with 100ft of push cable. However, the Compact camera works great on lines 2" and above and you can normally push it the entire length in 2-4" but some 6" lines may get a little harder to push it out the entired 100ft. Also if you already have a monitor that records you can just buy the reel for the compact and hook it up to an existing monitor. I would say you will use the compact more, but the MicroDrain comes in handy. If you would like prices on anything or you have any other questions feel free to contact our office at 18009505023 we also do repairs.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

          Originally posted by allstarsewerequipment View Post
          However, the Compact camera works great on lines 2" and above .

          But generally not through a 2" (or less) trap. Not easily, anyhow. And if you somehow manage to get it through, have fun getting it back.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

            Thanks for the input guys,

            Has anyone ever tried attaching the camera head to a flat rod to help give it more rigidity farther out?

            -Chris

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: SeeSnake Compact Recorder?

              Originally posted by Swade Plumbing View Post
              Thanks for the input guys,

              Has anyone ever tried attaching the camera head to a flat rod to help give it more rigidity farther out?

              -Chris
              Yep, I do it all the time - I use a 5/16" fiberglass duct rod to back up my 325' Std. when someone wants me to find a lost tap on a large dia. main line. I just thread the duct rod out of its reel through the loop, through the loop on the camera reel where the camera pushrod goes, and tape them together just behind the camera head with electrical tape. I keep meaning to get a picture of this and post it here so you all can see it, but I am usually out on a street with traffic trying to run me over...I always forget to do it for some reason.

              I use CONDUX rods:

              http://www.condux.com/catalog-detail...bcategoryid=35

              Not cheap, but have many uses. I used it once with the brass "hammerhead" to pound a hole through some serious restaurant grease that had totally plugged up a 4" service lateral under a city street. Jetter and mainline cable got nowhere with it. Once the hole was made, the cable guy was able to start reaming it out and finally got it all cleared.

              If you do much video of large dia. (4" +) electrical conduit, the duct rod is a must. Conduit doesn't have to flow down hill like a sewer - most often runs flat with various ups & downs. Real PITA to push a camera long distances through since you can't get gravity to help you and they're dry inside.

              Comment

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